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Well be watching closely not so much because Bar

first_img We’ll be watching closely, not so much because Barrick’s success is important to us (we aren’t shareholders), but because of what the project’s progress will tell us about Chile as a mining jurisdiction. The country has been a top mining jurisdiction for decades and remains the world’s top copper-exporting country. However, that standing has been seriously eroded in recent years due to increased regulation, taxation, legal challenges, local protests, and currently, an administration that seems openly hostile to mining. For example, Chile made headlines with its move to halt Goldcorp’s El Morro gold and copper mine and its plans to abolish tax incentives for foreign direct investors. More alarming still are surveys showing that 83% of Chileans are in favor of nationalizing the country’s copper mines. None of these problems will go away simply because of one court’s ruling in favor of one project, of course, but the win for Barrick does break what had been a relentless flow of bad news from Chile. If this means that the administration has realized that the country still needs mining and has changed course, we may see more such decisions and a shift in regulatory emphasis. This would be great news, greatly reducing the risk in many investment opportunities in Chilean minerals. On the other hand, if the ruling is just a legal outlier and Chile’s slide from mining grace continues, rushing to buy Chile plays now could be a huge mistake. Clearly then, the correct course of action is to wait and watch what happens next. If the news is good over the next year, we may start investing in Chile again. Otherwise, we’ll be glad we stayed away. Barrick’s story serves as another potent reminder that political risk originating from government and its actions to mining is among the most important factors for resource investors to consider. Unfortunately, keeping on top of such risks isn’t always easy, even for the savviest of investors. Here at Casey Research, we keep tabs on such risks pretty much 24/7—so you don’t have to. Take, for instance, Louis who travels every month on intense due-diligence trips—literally kicking rocks at locations all over the world—that are essential for assessing the on-the-ground realities of doing business in these faraway places. If you’d like some help on that, or you want our top recommendations, I encourage you to try the Casey International Speculator now, which comes with our money-back satisfaction guarantee. Our latest issue also features a Casey Country Score tabulation to help you gauge the relative political risk of our portfolio picks. The news hit the wires earlier this week that Barrick Gold won a major legal and regulatory victory in Chile, after the Environmental Court of Santiago ruled that the company’s much maligned Pascua-Lama gold and silver project “has not damaged glaciers within the area of its influence.” The move, as positive as it is, comes after a long legal row between Barrick and the influential groups opposing construction of the project, which straddles the Chile-Argentine border high in the Andes. Pascua-Lama was supposed to provide a large share of Barrick’s future gold production, but instead has become a poster child for what can happen to a mining project that gets targeted by those who oppose mining and have political power. Barrick had actually overcome vocal opposition, long permitting delays, huge cost overruns, and more, only to see the project frozen by environmental regulators in Chile in May 2013 over demands that more infrastructure to prevent possible water pollution be built. At that point, the company had already invested roughly $5 billion in Pascua-Lama. Even though construction activities in Argentina, where the majority of Pascua-Lama’s critical infrastructure is located, weren’t affected, Barrick was forced to shelve the project in October 2013. Today, even with the worst legal challenges settled—for now—the road to production at Pascua-Lama remains long and uncertain. Between cost overruns and the decline in bullion prices, the project’s economics are less compelling. Barrick, however, has scrapped several major projects in recent years, so it needs to bring some big new mines online soon or it won’t be the world’s largest gold producer for long (see chart below). The incentives to make it all work out are in place, so it will be interesting to see what happens. last_img read more

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A year ago Facebook started using artificial inte

first_imgA year ago, Facebook started using artificial intelligence to scan people’s accounts for danger signs of imminent self-harm. Facebook Global Head of Safety Antigone Davis is pleased with the results so far.”In the very first month when we started it, we had about 100 imminent-response cases,” which resulted in Facebook contacting local emergency responders to check on someone. But that rate quickly increased. “To just give you a sense of how well the technology is working and rapidly improving … in the last year we’ve had 3,500 reports,” she says. That means AI monitoring is causing Facebook to contact emergency responders an average of about 10 times a day to check on someone — and that doesn’t include Europe, where the system hasn’t been deployed. (That number also doesn’t include wellness checks that originate from people who report suspected suicidal behavior online.)Davis says the AI works by monitoring not just what a person writes online, but also how his or her friends respond. For instance, if someone starts streaming a live video, the AI might pick up on the tone of people’s replies.”Maybe like, ‘Please don’t do this,’ ‘We really care about you.’ There are different types of signals like that that will give us a strong sense that someone may be posting of self-harm content,” Davis says.When the software flags someone, Facebook staffers decide whether to call the local police, and AI comes into play there, too. “We also are able to use AI to coordinate a bunch of information on location to try to identify the location of that individual so that we can reach out to the right emergency response team,” she says.In the U.S., Facebook’s call usually goes to a local 911 center, as illustrated in its promotional video.Mason Marks isn’t surprised that Facebook is employing AI this way. He’s a medical doctor and research fellow at Yale and NYU law schools, and recently wrote about Facebook’s system. “Ever since they’ve introduced livestreaming on their platform, they’ve had a real problem with people livestreaming suicides,” Marks says. “Facebook has a real interest in stopping that.”He isn’t sure this AI system is the right solution, in part because Facebook has refused to share key data, such as the AI’s accuracy rate. How many of those 3,500 “wellness checks” turned out to be actual emergencies? The company isn’t saying.He says scrutiny of the system is especially important because this “black box of algorithms,” as he calls it, has the power to trigger a visit from the police.”It needs to be done very methodically, very cautiously, transparently, and really looking at the evidence,” Marks says.For instance, Marks says, the outcomes need to be checked for unintended consequences — such as a potential squelching of frank conversations about suicide on Facebook’s various platforms.”People … might fear a visit from police, so they might pull back and not engage in an open and honest dialogue,” he says. “And I’m not sure that’s a good thing.”But Facebook’s Davis says releasing too many details about how the AI works might be counterproductive. “That information could could allow people to play games with the system,” Davis says. “So I think what we are very focused on is working very closely with people who are experts in mental health, people who are experts in suicide prevention to ensure that we do this in a responsible, ethical, sensitive and thoughtful way.”The ethics of using an AI to alert police to people’s online behavior may soon go beyond suicide-prevention. Davis says Facebook has also experimented with AI to detect “inappropriate interactions” between minors and adults. Law professor Ryan Calo, co-director of the University of Washington’s Tech Policy Lab, says AI-based monitoring of social media may follow a predictable pattern for how new technologies gradually work their way into law enforcement.”The way it would happen would be we would take something that everybody agrees is terrible — something like suicide, which is epidemic, something like child pornography, something like terrorism — so these early things, and then if they show promise in these sectors, we broaden them to more and more things. And that’s a concern.”There may soon be a temptation to use this kind of AI to analyze social media chatter for signs of imminent crimes — especially retaliatory violence. Some police departments have already tried watching social media for early warnings of violence between suspected gang members, but an AI run by Facebook might do the same job more effectively.Calo says society may soon have to ask important questions about whether to allow that kind of monitoring.”If you can truly get an up-or-down yes or no, and it’s reliable, if intervention is not likely to cause additional harm, and is this something that we think it is important enough to prevent, that this is justified?” Calo says. “That’s a difficult calculus, and I think it’s one we’re going to have to be making more and more.”If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting 741741. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Government and health care officials have kicked o

first_imgGovernment and health care officials have kicked off a statewide campaign aimed at combatting a growing opioid crisis.North Carolina has teamed up with the state’s two largest health care companies and dozens of other groups to introduce a program called More Powerful NC.The $2.5 million public awareness campaign will utilize TV, radio and billboards statewide to deliver its message.The program was launched Thursday by Attorney General Josh Stein, Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy Cohen, and other officials.Stein told The News and Observer that the opioid crisis is the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history, and is impacting families across North Carolina.Most of the funding for the advertising campaign is coming from private sources, including Charlotte-based Atrium Health and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. Another $365,000 will be provided from state and federal money allocated for opioid-related programs.last_img read more

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The aunt of a disabled man who was imprisoned and

first_imgThe aunt of a disabled man who was imprisoned and tortured to death is asking the attorney general to appeal against the judge’s failure to treat his murder as a disability hate crime.James Wheatley, 29, from Kenton Bar, Newcastle, repeatedly kicked, punched and stamped on Lee Irving (pictured) in attacks that took place over nine days, leaving him with multiple broken bones and other injuries.After he died, Irving’s body was taken on a pushchair through a housing estate and dumped on a patch of grass near the A1.Wheatley was found guilty of murder earlier this month, and was sentenced to life in prison, where he will have to serve at least 23 years.Three other defendants – Wheatley’s mother Julie Mills, 52, girlfriend Nicole Lawrence, 22, and lodger Barry Imray, 35 – were also jailed for offences connected with Irving’s death, Mills to eight years, Lawrence to four years, and Imray to three.But although Northumbria police and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) treated Irving’s death as a hate crime, Mr Justice Soole, who sentenced the four, decided there was not enough evidence to prove that any of the offences were motivated by disability-related hostility.Instead, he increased Wheatley’s sentence because of Irving’s “vulnerability”.Lee’s aunt, Lisa Irving, told Disability News Service (DNS) this week that her nephew’s murder had left the family “traumatised” and with “little faith in society”.She said the family “fully appreciated the verdicts” but were “devastated about the sentence and how the judge did not accept that it was a disability hate crime. How is it not?” She said the family were equally disturbed by the failings of social services and the police.Newcastle City Council has launched a serious case review into the circumstances that led to her nephew’s death.Lee Irving’s murder is just the latest in a long line of brutal killings that the criminal justice system has failed to treat as disability hate crimes, despite legislation intended to provide longer sentences in such circumstances.They include the killings of Brent Martin, Peter Hedley, Albert Adams, Stephen Hoskin, Kevin Davies, Michael Gilbert… and now Lee Irving.Section 146 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 imposes a duty on the court to increase sentences for offences motivated by disability-related hostility, while the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO) 2012 doubles to 30 years the starting point for sentences for disability hate crime murders. Lisa Irving is now working with members of the Disability Hate Crime Network (DHCN) to persuade the attorney general to appeal the sentence handed to Wheatley.She also wants the offences committed by Mills and Lawrence to be treated as hate crimes, although she believes that Imray, who himself had learning difficulties, was probably a victim of disability hate crime himself and was forced by Wheatley to help him cover up his crimes.The Disability Hate Crime Network has now written to the attorney general, the Tory MP Jeremy Wright, to ask him to seek a tougher sentence from the court of appeal.The letter was written by Katharine Quarmby, on behalf of Lisa Irving and the network, and she told Wright that the police and CPS had “presented good evidence of disability hate targeting”.Quarmby, one of the network’s coordinators, and the author of Scapegoat, a pioneering investigation into disability hate crime, told DNS that she was “disappointed” by the failure to increase the sentences for those involved in Lee Irving’s murder.She said she was not aware of a single case in which the LASPO 30-year tariff had yet been used.Quarmby said she welcomed apparent signs of progress in sentencing some lower-level disability hate crimes, but said this could be a sign that magistrates were starting to take the issue seriously, while judges were failing to do so.But she added: “However, when very serious crimes such as murder are sentenced, there seems to be a block in sentencing them as disability hate crimes.“The law, as it currently stands, could be said to be set up to fail – it has to be investigated, prosecuted and sentenced as a disability hate crime.“If one person in that chain – investigating officer, CPS prosecutor or judge – fails to view the crime as disability-related, there is no sentence uplift.“This fails the victim, the family and wider society.“Sentencing such crimes as disability-related would send a strong ‘declaratory effect’ to society that we do not tolerate such crimes and they are sentenced accordingly.“I would like to see a discussion of possible law reform, if the current law is not fit for purpose, which I feel it is no longer.”Anne Novis, a DHCN coordinator who leads for Inclusion London on disability hate crime, added: “It is more than time now for all cases where if a person perceives their experience as disability hate crime, as well as police and CPS, then this should be treated as such by judges.She said: “To repeatedly read of cases where this aspect is ignored, ruled irrelevant, and no enhanced sentencing re hate crime applied gives a message that we as disabled people do not experience hate crime, and that the perpetrators get away with a sentence far less than they should get.“The message given is that our human rights as victims of crime are less than those of others. This is not acceptable and must be changed.“Via Inclusion London and the DHCN we will campaign to see this does happen.”Meanwhile, a third DHCN coordinator, Stephen Brookes, has written to the solicitor general, the Tory MP Robert Buckland, asking for a meeting to raise the network’s concerns about “the all too frequent failure of the court system (in particular the judiciary) to fully understand and implement appropriate sentences for cases of disability hostility”.He welcomed Buckland’s work on encouraging the reporting of hate crime by disabled people, but added: “The successful work we have done along with police forces and CPS prosecutors in jointly pressing for disability hate crime to be treated as such has been thwarted in most cases by court decisions.”He pointed to the Lee Irving case as an example of how, despite improved confidence in police forces and CPS, “we are facing a total and unacceptable brick wall in courts in that the judiciary only seem to consider vulnerability as a cause, which means that disability hate is often not considered as part of a sentence uplift”.He told Buckland: “It is about time that judges were given some real awareness training in what… disability actually means, rather than categorising us all as poor vulnerable victims.”last_img read more

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Poll Young Americans say online bullying a serious problem

first_imgTeens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The long-documented problem with online bullying is that it is relentless. It doesn’t let up when kids get home from school, safely in their homes, or even when they move away from their tormentors. Still, like Luby, many young people tend to be more resilient to trolling from strangers online.”If they don’t know who it is, it doesn’t seem to bother them as much,” said Justin Patchin, a criminal justice professor at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center. “What concerns them is when it’s some kid at school.” In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby, standing in front of a ring light, has her hair brushed by her mother Kerrylynn Mahoney in Wethersfield, Conn. Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The high school gymnast’s popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby holds up her phone in front of a ring light she uses to lip-sync with the smartphone app Musical.ly, in Wethersfield, Conn. Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The high school gymnast’s popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) That’s according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and MTV, which also finds that about half of both young people and their parents view social media as having a mostly negative effect on the younger generation.Fifteen-year-old Matty Nev Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies.”When I see a really mean comment about my appearance or something I did, if someone said that to me online, it means nothing to me, but if I pictured someone I know saying that, I would be really upset,” Luby said.Roughly three-quarters of 15- to 26-year-olds say that online bullying and abuse is a serious problem for their peers. Seven percent of young people say they have already been a victim of cyberbullying, with young women (11 percent) more likely to say they were bullied than young men (3 percent).”People will make fun of their outfits or weight, their choices,” said Luby, who lives in a suburb of Hartford, Connecticut, and has been dabbling in social media since age 12. Patchin said that among adults, the people perpetuating harassment tend to be strangers, not people they know.Leslie Hernandez, 39, said she thinks the impact of social media on people her age has been mostly positive.”Adults tend to stay away from the drama that is part of adolescence,” said Hernandez, who lives in Tucson, Arizona. “It allows you to connect with people from your past.”According to the poll, she is in the minority. Among parents of 15- to 26-year-olds, about a quarter, 23 percent, say social media has had a mostly positive effect on people their age, while 31 percent say it’s been negative; 45 percent say it’s neither positive nor negative. Among people aged 15 to 26, 47 percent say it’s had a negative effect on their generation, and 26 percent say it’s been a good thing, while another 26 percent think it’s neither. About half of parents, 53 percent, agree social media has had a mostly negative effect on their child’s generation. Explore further In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby poses for a photograph in front of a ring light she uses for her internet posts in Wethersfield, Conn. Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The high school gymnast’s popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby, right, and her mother Kerrylynn Mahoney pose together for a photograph in Wethersfield, Conn. Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The high school gymnast’s popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) “I have to constantly keep her grounded,” Mahoney said. “I’m thankful she’s aware that this is not real. It’s our jobs as parents to reel them back in.”The poll shows majorities of both young people and their parents think parents have a responsibility to help prevent online harassment. Poll: Teens say social media makes them feel bettercenter_img Her popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Now she’s mostly focused on Instagram, where she follows makeup artists and fashion trends.Her mother, Kerrylynn Mahoney, said she’s impressed by her daughter’s ability to keep bullies at bay.”Her responses blow my mind,” Mahoney said. “I’d be fists up at her age. She’s like, ‘I’m sorry you feel that way. You should probably think in a more positive way and then we’d have more peace on earth.'”But she’s also vigilant about monitoring her daughter’s accounts, blocking any followers who seem creepy or fake and trying to steer her away from fixating on pages that degrade women. No matter their age, the overwhelming majority say they see people using discriminatory language or posting such images. Seventy-eight percent of people aged 15 to 26 say they see such posts either sometimes or often, compared with 65 percent of their parents. Only 4 percent of young people and 10 percent of their parents say they never see discriminatory language or images.Companies like Facebook and Twitter have been trying for years to clamp down on abuse and harassment, with varying degrees of success. Both parents (72 percent) and young people (67 percent) think the companies play a major role in addressing these problems.Roughly two-thirds of parents also attribute responsibility to schools (68 percent), law enforcement (66 percent) and other users who witness the behavior (61 percent).Currently, young internet users report using YouTube (48 percent), Facebook (47 percent), Instagram (40 percent) and Snapchat (39 percent) several times a day or more. Fewer use Twitter, Reddit, WhatsApp, Tumblr or LinkedIn as regularly. Parents who use the internet are most likely to report using Facebook (53 percent) several times a day or more, with few being heavy users of other social media sites. Hernandez said she’s “pretty active” on Facebook, in part because of her job as a student housing manager at a college.”Snapchat feels a little less personal to me,” she said. “On Facebook you can kind of follow people and see what’s going on in their lives in a more permanent kind of way. A Snapchat image, people will forget. On Instagram, people can enjoy the pictures but don’t really see a whole (life).” In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby holds up her phone in front of a ring light she uses to lip-sync with the smartphone app Musical.ly, in Wethersfield, Conn. Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The high school gymnast’s popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, Matty Nev Luby holds her phone and logs into the lip-sync smartphone app Musical.ly, in Wethersfield, Conn. Teens and young adults say cyberbullying is a serious problem for people their age, but most don’t think they’ll be the ones targeted for digital abuse. The high school gymnast’s popularity on the lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which merged this summer into the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok, helped win her some modeling contracts. Luby said she’s learned to navigate Instagram and other social media apps by brushing aside the anonymous bullies. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. More information: AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research: www.apnorc.org Citation: Poll: Young Americans say online bullying a serious problem (2018, October 4) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-poll-young-americans-online-bullying.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Senate passes bill meant to combat robocalls

first_img Explore further Help coming on blocking scam calls for robocall-plagued US Though the measure wouldn’t eliminate all unwanted calls, it would give regulators more tools to go after scammers. It would also push phone companies to adopt new technology to combat fake phone numbers popping up on caller ID.The Senate passed the bill 97-1 on Thursday. It’s not clear what will happen in the House, where Democrats in charge have their own anti-robocall proposals.The bill has support from the telecom industry and consumer groups, a rare combination.As scam call volume rises, the Federal Communications Commission is trying to nudge phone companies. The nation’s communications regulator will vote in June to allow carriers to block scam calls by default for customers. This Aug. 1, 2017, file photo, shows a call log displayed via an AT&T app on a cellphone in Orlando, Fla. The app helps locate and block fraudulent calls, although some robocalls do get through. The Senate has passed a bill that aims to combat the illegal robocalls torturing Americans. The Traced Act on Thursday, May 23, 2019, passed 97-1. It’s not clear what will happen in the House, where the Democrats in charge have made several anti-robocall proposals. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File) © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.center_img Citation: Senate passes bill meant to combat robocalls (2019, May 23) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-senate-bill-meant-combat-robocalls.html The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that aims to combat the illegal robocalls torturing Americans . This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Scientists Find an Exceptional Specimen of a Cretaceous LizardInside a Dinosaurs Belly

first_img The new Cretaceous lizard species was found in the abdomen of a Microraptor fossil (indicated by the white rectangle). Credit: Jingmai O’Connor Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoLivestlyThese Dog Breeds Do Not Make Good PetsLivestlyUndoYahoo SearchYou’ve Never Seen Luxury Like This On A Cruise Ship. Search Luxury Mediterranean CruisesYahoo SearchUndo They dubbed the ingested lizard Indrasaurus wangi: The species name honors paleontologist Yuan Wang, director of the Paleozoological Museum of China, and Indrasaurus refers to a legend from ancient Indian texts about the deity Indra, who was swallowed whole by a dragon. Close examination of the lizard’s teeth revealed that they were widely spaced, short-crowned and nearly square. They were unlike the teeth in other Cretaceous lizards, and their unusual shape suggests that the lizard may have had a diet that differed from that of its close relatives, the scientists said in the study. Microraptor and its lizard lunch provide a rare glimpse of direct interactions between predators and prey in ecosystems that vanished millions of years ago. They were found alongside other Microraptor fossils that hold the remains of mammals, fish and birds in their bellies, according to the study. Using these fossils and others from more than two dozen animal groups, the researchers reconstructed a food web showing who ate whom in the Jehol Biota; this site in Liaoning, China — where Microraptor was discovered in 2005 — holds a diverse array of exceptionally preserved fossils dating from 133 million to 120 million years ago. The findings were published online July 11 in the journal Current Biology. About 120 million years ago, a small dinosaur gulped down a lizard, swallowing the reptile whole. The wee lizard’s story might have ended there, but the dinosaur died soon after and was preserved as a fossil. Millions of years later, paleontologists discovered the scaly meal in the dinosaur’s belly. Scientists found the lizard when they examined the fossil of a feathered dinosaur named Microraptor zhaoianus, a small carnivore from the early Cretaceous period (145.5 million to 65.5 million years ago) in what is now northeastern China. In Microraptor’s abdomen was a near-complete skeleton that the researchers identified as a previously unknown lizard species. This “exceptional specimen” paints a clearer picture of the animal diversity in this region during the Cretaceous, and it hints at what was on the menu for dinosaur predators like Microraptor, the scientists reported in a new study. [In Photos: Amber Preserves Cretaceous Lizards]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65935-cretaceous-lizard-in-dinosaur-belly.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Microraptor belongs to the theropod (meat-eating) dinosaur group known as the dromaeosaurids — small to medium-size bird-like dinosaurs — which also includes Velociraptor and Deinonychus. It had flight feathers on its front and back limbs, and it could likely glide or even fly, according to the study. The fossilized lizard’s skeleton was still whole and nearly complete, and it appeared to belong to a juvenile. Its position inside the dinosaur’s gut showed that it was gulped down head first, “consistent with feeding behavior in extant carnivorous lizards and birds,” the study authors wrote. Images: Dinosaurs That Learned to Fly Tiny Dino: Reconstructing Microraptor’s Black Feathers Image Gallery: 25 Amazing Ancient Beastslast_img read more

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Laidoff expat bankers struggle to find jobs in Hong Kong

first_img Tags / Keywords: World 09 Jul 2019 Hong Kong singer-activist urges U.N. rights body to defend territory HONG KONG: For years, Hong Kong was a hotspot with plum jobs for overseas bankers as global firms hired aggressively. But many recently laid-off bankers in the city are finding that cost-cutting and a demand for Mandarin speakers have diminished the opportunities for expats in Asia’s financial hub.After Deutsche Bank AG announced plans for wide-ranging cuts this week, many employees worldwide are facing the challenge of job-hunting in a shrinking market. For foreign staff losing positions in Hong Kong, it could be harder than most.Other international firms such as Nomura Holdings Inc. have also cut jobs in Hong Kong. At the same time, the city’s famously expensive living costs, including some of the world’s highest rents, mean that even senior bankers need to find new jobs fast in order to stay.The upshot? Expat bankers who lost their jobs and want to remain in Hong Kong often have to consider lower-paying options or demotions. Some with longer-running ties to the city are looking at switching careers, weighing everything from consulting to cryptocurrency outfits.During the global financial crisis of 2008, Asian banks and local Chinese firms hired those who had been laid off by foreign players, said Will Glover, Hong Kong-based managing director for recruitment firm Macdonald & Co. That’s less likely this year and some of those taking on new jobs may have to take pay cuts, he said.”You get that volume of people anywhere into a market at one time and inevitably a lot of people will leave the market altogether,” Glover said. “There will not be enough opportunities to absorb all that supply.”While global banks are ramping up their focus on China, more of them are looking for people with language skills and networks on the Chinese mainland. That could help Deutsche Bank staff from around the world who are Chinese citizens, and who have been sending resumes seeking jobs back home or at Chinese banks. But for Westerners in Hong Kong, the prospects look tougher.Looking to StayA senior banker in Hong Kong who is in his 50s and was laid off from a European investment bank earlier this year said he would like to continue to live in the city, where his children go to school.But he expects it to be hard to find a top job because banks are moving people internally or hiring more people locally. His monthly rent is about HK$100,000 ($12,800), making it essential to find a job soon if he decides to stay.It’s a dilemma that many others are grappling with. One European banker laid off from a top Asian bank said he took a holiday and is now pondering working in a startup or even moving out of Hong Kong after 20 years.Deutsche Bank’s website until Wednesday said it had more than 1,200 people in Hong Kong, although that statistic has since been removed. The bank has cut about half its equities staff in Asia and plans to reduce the group by another 25% within a month, a person familiar with the matter said earlier this month. Deutsche Bank didn’t comment on the size of its layoffs in Hong Kong.A Deutsche Bank employee in Hong Kong, recently laid off, said many of her colleagues plan to stay in Hong Kong and are looking at positions in banking, family offices, or asset management. She’s hoping to use her background in compliance for another job in finance.One former Deutsche Bank employee, Su Zhu, who worked at the firm in Hong Kong until 2012 and now runs a Singapore foreign exchange and cryptocurrency fund called Three Arrows Capital, said that over the past year many bankers have gone into the crypto industry.Foreign banks can now choose from a widening pool of young professionals raised in Hong Kong, who speak multiple languages, know Chinese culture, have trained overseas and don’t require expensive relocation packages. That makes it harder for foreign bankers currently in the city, as well as junior professionals attempting to move from overseas, to find new positions in Hong Kong.A British equities trader who lost his job at an American investment bank this year said he had spent almost four months interviewing at banks and hedge funds with no luck. He lost one position to a local candidate 10 years his junior, and is now considering leaving.Expatriate executives in Hong Kong earn $276,417 a year on average, including benefits, according to a May report by consultancy ECA International, which analyzed salaries from financial and non-financial firms.Pay ScalesAverage pay scales lagged Japan, China and India, although affordable domestic help and a work-friendly visa system for trailing spouses help make Hong Kong attractive. But Hong Kong also topped a recent Deutsche Bank global ranking for the most expensive monthly rents on a two-bedroom apartment, and ranked 39th for disposable income after rent.Senior expats have tended to live in expensive places and send their children to international schools, living off base salaries and saving bonuses, said Benjamin Quinlan, chief executive officer of financial-services consultancy Quinlan & Associates in Hong Kong.”The expat’s side of things is going to be significantly harder,” Quinlan said. “A lot of people are going to have to take down their expectations, even get demoted and really take any opportunity they can really find, as opposed to waiting out in the market for a magic position to come up again because it will not.” – Bloomberg {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} After Deutsche Bank AG announced plans for wide-ranging cuts this week, many employees worldwide are facing the challenge of job-hunting in a shrinking market. 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