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Elvis Presley-Themed Traffic Lights Appear In German Town

first_imgAmerica’s obsession with Elvis Presley has danced its way over to Europe. That appears to be the case for law-abiding motorists over in Friedberg, Germany, where “The King,” as he’s dubbed here in the States, is now dictating drivers on when they can and can’t cross the road.Yup, red and green traffic lights showing trademark Elvis poses have been installed into the German town as a way of boosting tourism and hopefully getting more drivers enthused about paying attention when behind the wheel.The concept of using Elvis Presley to dictate to drivers and pedestrians when it’s safe to continue crossing the road isn’t too far fetched. Pressley called the town of Friedberg his home for two years from October 1958 to March 1960, back when he was stationed there as a member of the U.S. Army. Good times, right? The idea came from the citizens of Friedberg who proposed it to the town council, and only cost a manageable $1,020 to install the colored silhouettes into a trio of traffic lights.The red light shows the Elvis character standing near the mic, meaning drivers need to hold up for a minute while the guitar solo passes. The green light, of course, shows the Elvis image moving to the music with that dangerous circling pelvis of his, meaning it’s time to rock and roll!According to a local report, the town police had to agree to traffic law changes, which included various graphic design proposals which would need to be installed by the traffic light company. The entire process took three months before the project was given, wait for it, the green light.Related: Robert Plant Joined A Rockabilly Group To Sing Elvis Covers At His Ex-Wife’s Birthday PartyThe installment of the Elvis-themed traffic lights last month also came around the same time that the famous rocker’s former home-turned-museum, Graceland, announced it would be expanding its concert schedule in 2019 as well. The popular tourist attraction in Memphis, Tennessee routinely hosts Elvis-focused events, but a new partnership alongside concert promoter Live Nation will allow the former residence to begin hosting shows by today’s contemporary artists onto its grounds beginning this spring and summer.[H/T CNN]last_img read more

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Rapid acts of kindness

first_imgWhy are people sometimes willing to put “we” ahead of “me”? Perhaps our first impulse is to be selfish, and cooperation is all about reining in greed. Or maybe cooperation happens spontaneously, and too much thinking gets in the way.Harvard scientists are getting closer to an answer, with research showing that people’s first response is to cooperate and that stopping to think encourages selfishness.David Rand, a postdoctoral fellow in psychology, Joshua Greene, the John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, and Martin Nowak, professor of mathematics and of biology and director of the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, published their findings in the Sept. 20 issue of Nature. They recruited thousands of participants to play a “public goods game.” Subjects were put into small groups and faced with a choice: keep the money you’ve been given, or contribute it to a common pool that grows and benefits the whole group. Hold onto the money and you come out ahead, but the group does best when everyone contributes.The researchers wanted to know whether a person’s first impulse is cooperative or selfish. They started by looking at how quickly different people made their choices, and found that fast deciders were more likely to contribute to the common good.Next they forced people to go fast or to stop and think, and found the same thing: Fast deciders tended to be more cooperative, and the people who had to stop and think gave less.Finally, the researchers tested their hypothesis by manipulating people’s mind-sets. They asked some people to think about the benefits of intuition before choosing how much to contribute. Others were asked to think about the virtues of careful reasoning. Once again, intuition promoted cooperation, and deliberation did the opposite.While some might interpret the findings as suggesting that cooperation is “innate” or “hard-wired,” if anything they highlight the role of experience. People who had better opinions of those around them in everyday life showed more cooperative impulses in these experiments. Previous experience with these types of studies eroded those impulses.“In daily life, it’s generally in your interest to be cooperative,” Rand said. “So we internalize cooperation as the right way to behave. Then when we come into unusual environments, where incentives like reputation and sanctions are removed, our first response is to keep behaving the way we do in normal life. When we think about it, however, we realize that this is one of those rare situations where we can be selfish and get away with it.”Unlike many psychology studies, which use small numbers of college students, these experiments tested thousands of people from around the world using Amazon Mechanical Turk, an online labor market that’s becoming an increasingly popular tool for social science research.The findings reveal a dark side to careful thought and deliberation. But is reflection always bad?“When it’s ‘me’ vs. ‘us,’ our intuitions seem to work well. That’s what’s going on here,” said Greene. “But what happens when people have different moral intuitions, for example, about abortion or raising taxes? When intuitions clash — when it’s the values of ‘us’ vs. ‘them’ — reasoning and reflection may be our best hope for reconciling our differences.”Said Nowak: “Over millions of years we’ve evolved the capacity for cooperation. These psychological experiments examine the causes of cooperation on a shorter time scale, on the order of seconds. Both perspectives are essential as we face global problems which require cooperation on a massive scale. We need to understand where cooperation comes from historically and how best to make it happen here and now.”last_img read more

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If/Then, Led by Idina Menzel, Opens on Broadway

first_img In addition to Menzel, the cast includes Tony winner LaChanze, Anthony Rapp, Jenn Colella, Jerry Dixon, James Snyder, Jason Tam, Tamika Lawrence, Joe Cassidy, Miguel Cervantes, Curtis Holbrook, Stephanie Klemons, Tyler McGee, Ryann Redmond, Joe Aaron Reid and Ann Sanders. LaChanze Related Shows It’s Idina times two! If/Then, the new musical by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, opens on Broadway March 30 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. The musical, directed by Michael Greif and starring Tony winner and Frozen star Idina Menzel, tells the story of a woman who wants to make a brand new start as she returns to the Big Apple. Anthony Rapp About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Idina Menzelcenter_img If/Then View Comments In celebration of the show’s opening night, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson sketched this portrait of Idina, Idina again (or is that Adele?), and the cast of If/Then. Whichever path they choose, Broadway.com wishes them all a happy opening! Show Closed This production ended its run on March 22, 2015 Star Fileslast_img read more

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Cattle marketing

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaBeef cattle producers who want to better market their cattle should attend one of two workshops to be held June 30-July 1 in Florence, SC, and July 27-28 in Tifton, GA.Specialists from southeastern universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will combine hands-on learning and live animal evaluation with classroom examples to help cattlemen reduce their risks and improve their profits.Participants will see live cattle and learn how they fit into today’s market. They’ll learn about cattle cycles, how to anticipate prices and use futures and options to increase profits. There will be a session on alternative marketing methods, too, such as video board sales, tele-auctions and marketing cattle with other producers.Registration is $35 and includes materials, meals, breaks and refreshments for one workshop. Register online at www.ugatiftonconference.org or call 229/386-3416.last_img read more

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European companies target U.S. offshore wind market

first_imgEuropean companies target U.S. offshore wind market FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The Trump administration wants to fire up development of the U.S. offshore wind industry by streamlining permitting and carving out vast areas off the coast for leasing—part of its ‘America First’ policy to boost domestic energy production and jobs.The drive to open America’s offshore wind industry has attracted Europe’s biggest renewable energy companies, who see the U.S. East Coast as a new frontier after years of success across the Atlantic. Less experienced U.S. wind power companies, meanwhile, have struggled to compete in their own backyard, according to lease data and interviews with industry executives. Many are steering clear of the opportunity altogether, concerned by development costs and attracted to cheaper options on land.Since 2014, European-backed companies have won all eight of the U.S. government’s competitive offshore wind lease auctions with aggressive bids that have pumped up prices into the tens of millions of dollars.Bidding in an auction last year for nearly 80,000 acres off the coast of New York, for example, lasted 33 rounds with Norway’s Equinor, formerly known as Statoil, eventually winning the lease for a record $42.5 million. An individual lease had never before sold for more than $5 million, according to public records. Europeans claimed another victory in May when a partnership between Copenhagen Infrastructure Fund and Avangrid, the U.S. arm of Spain’s Iberdrola, won the largest ever U.S. contract for offshore wind power, in Massachusetts.While the U.S. East Coast has wind conditions and sea depths similar to the North Sea, it boasts just one five-turbine wind farm off the coast of Rhode Island. That wind farm was developed by privately-held U.S. firm Deepwater Wind LLC, which is backed by hedge fund D. E. Shaw Group. Deepwater Wind’s chief executive, Jeff Grybowski, called the U.S. wind industry’s hesitation to move offshore outdated.  “I’m sure that we will see more American entrants in this business as time goes on,” he said. “Until then we’re happy to fly the flag.”More: Trump effort to lift U.S. offshore wind sector sparks interest – from Europelast_img read more

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Appalachian Trail Dispatch: Monuments

first_img Editor’s Note: Blue Ridge Outdoors contributor Chris Gallaway is currently thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail. He will be periodically checking in with BRO and sharing the story of his hike. This is his fourth dispatch from the A.T. Read his other dispatches from the trail: A Cold Start, Trail Magic, and Difficult Winter.Many people come to the Appalachian Trail looking to leave a mark. They distinguish themselves by hiking faster or longer than others, by carrying the least amount of weight or the most, or more commonly by scrawling their name and message on the shelter walls (we Purist hikers frown at this!). As most people find, the Trail ends up leaving more of a mark on us, revealing our character and personality in new ways and impacting our life and outlook. The impact the Trail has is evident in the number of people who place burial markers along the way. Between Watauga Lake and Damascus, Virginia the ridgeline is peppered with small cemeteries and markers. Some are old family plots; some commemorate hikers who loved the AT. The most memorable marker for old hermit Uncle Nick Grindstaff reads simply: “Born Dec. 26, 1851 – Died July 22, 1923 – Lived alone, suffered alone, died alone.”We’ve been hiking a long time now. Two months of life on the Trail has already shaped me in ways that I expected and ways I didn’t. I am most comfortable moving at a walking pace now–highways and traffic unsettle me. I’m a few pounds lighter, and my white chicken legs are strapped with more sinew and muscle than ever. I’d like to say that I’m a more patient, grounded person, but I’ll leave that for other people to comment on. It’s hard to believe that I’ve only made a quarter of the journey. There is so much time left and Trail to discover, and I feel the excitement of that thought flutter in my gut like happy butterflies. last_img read more

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Bateman becomes new deputy director of Bar’s Legal Division

first_imgBateman becomes new deputy director of Bar’s Legal Division Bateman becomes new deputy director of Bar’s Legal Division Two Florida Bar employees have recently taken on new responsibilities. Bar Unlicensed Practice of Law Counsel Mary Ellen Bateman has been named the deputy director of the Legal Division, and Lori Holcomb, assistant director of UPL, has replaced Bateman in the Bar’s top UPL job. Legal Division Director Tony Boggs said Bateman was a match for the new post, which combines oversight of all the department functions, including UPL and lawyer regulation. That oversight includes working on how the Bar will enforce its rules relating to multidisciplinary practices, which involve both lawyer regulation and UPL issues. She will also work on personnel, budget and administrative issues, he said. Boggs added that with about 140 employees, the Legal Division needed a deputy director. “We have always worked very well together and this will continue,” Boggs said. “We are stressing professionalism these days and Mary Ellen is the epitome of professionalism. She delivers a clear message and a quality message.” Boggs praised Holcomb for her commitment and hard work since joining the Bar. “As assistant UPL director, Lori has been preparing for the promotion for a number of years and has shown herself to be dedicated to The Florida Bar,” he said. “We expect big things from her.” Bateman first joined the Bar in 1982 as a Bar counsel in the Tallahassee branch office of the Lawyer Regulation Department. After a maternity leave, she returned in 1985 as acting UPL counsel, and that position became permanent later that year. She oversaw the expansion of the program several years ago, which included adding UPL attorneys in each of the Bar’s five branch offices. Holcomb joined the Bar in June 1987 as assistant UPL counsel. She became assistant director when the program expanded to include the branch UPL offices. Bateman became the division’s deputy director effective June 30. Holcomb’s new post was effective September 1. September 15, 2000 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Top 10 credit union marketing ideas you can use right now!

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit unions are especially attractive to the average consumer because they often provider a lower cost option for many of the same products offered by a traditional bank. But even if potential customers may realize that credit unions have more to offer than most banks, you still need to get them in the door.Here are 10 Credit Union Marketing Ideas that will help you get the visibility you need – right now!1) Website Easter EggsIn video game terminology, an Easter egg is a hidden area in a video game. Discovering these Easter eggs is always incredibly fun and intriguing to players, so consider planting a few Easter eggs on your website. For example, you can place a small icon in a well-hidden spot. By clicking on the icon, site visitors could earn a special surprise bonus when opening a new account.2) Make Your Receipts UniqueFor most people, ATM receipts are basically worthless paper…and in fact, your credit union probably sees piles of them left behind regularly.  If the back of your ATM receipts are blank, you may be missing a great opportunity. Consider working with local businesses who will offer discounts on the back of the receipts. For example, a local restaurant may offer 10 percent off a meal to anyone who presents a receipt coupon from your credit union. This co-branding could mean that people will consider receipts valuable again – and they’ll remember that your credit union made that discount possible. continue reading »last_img read more

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Malaysian PM quarantines after minister tests positive for COVID-19

first_imgMalaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin on Monday said he will self quarantine for 14 days after a minister who attended a high-level government meeting to discuss coronavirus developments on Saturday tested positive for COVID-19.The Southeast Asian country has seen a steady climb in cases in the past week in the aftermath of an election in the state of Sabah in Borneo on Sept 26.Authorities in Malaysia have warned that coronavirus restrictions may have to be reimposed if the trend continues, amid popular anger towards politicians who have been blamed for the spike. In a statement, Muhyiddin confirmed that Religious Affairs Minister Zulkifli Mohamad Al-Bakri had tested positive, and that those identified as close contacts at Saturday’s National Security Council meeting to discuss COVID-19 had been issued a 14-day home surveillance order starting Oct 3.”Pursuant to that, I will undergo self-quarantine at my home for 14 days as advised by the health ministry,” Muhyiddin said.”However, this will not interrupt government business. I will continue to work from home and use video conferencing to conduct meetings as necessary.”In an earlier statement, the health ministry said contact tracing had been carried out, including symptom screening and collection of swabs to detect COVID-19 infections.In a Facebook post on Monday, Zulkifli confirmed that he had tested positive for COVID-19 and was now undergoing treatment.In a separate statement, Malaysia’s health ministry reported 432 new daily cases on Monday, setting a new record since the country started tracking the pandemic.Topics :last_img read more

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Cash flows in Swiss pension fund market to turn negative in 2043 – report

first_imgNet cash flows into the Swiss pension fund market will fall by around CHF20bn (€18bn) and become marginally negative over the next 25 years solely because of demographic changes, according to projections from Credit Suisse.As a result, some pension funds could see their liquidity requirements increase, which would also have a negative impact on investment behaviour, a report from the bank warned.The report’s authors – Jan Schüpbach, senior economist, and Livio Fischbach, strategic advisor for pension funds, both at Credit Suisse – pointed out that while net cash flows into Swiss pension funds are still positive at present, they will be negative from 2043, taking into account the contributions of both employers and insured, as well as pensions and capital benefits.“On the one hand, inflows from retirement credits will continue to grow only slightly until 2045, due to the population increase of 300,000 people between the ages of 25 and 65,” said the authors. “Pension benefits, on the other hand, will increase significantly, as the number of people of retirement age will grow from 1.5 million to 2.7 million.” Net inflows would fall from CHF18.8bn in 2015 to CHF15.5bn in 2025, and then in 2045 there would be net outflows of CHF2.3bn, and -CHF9.1bn in 2065.This will increase the proportion of retirees’ pension capital in relation to that of active members: today, it stands at around 45%, but this figure will have risen to 57% by 2045, according to the projections. This will in turn reduce the funds’ risk capacity, as investment horizons become shorter.If absorbing the additional potential for returns, though desirable, increasingly comes into conflict with pension funds’ falling risk capacity, the current shift in pension fund asset allocation from bonds towards equities and real estate investments could slow in the future, said the authors.However, they said the results of the projections also demonstrated that the average extent of the changes should be bearable, and that a similar exposure to high-yield investment as at present could be maintained in the investment strategy.From 1900 to 2019, Swiss equities yielded 3.7% per annum more than Swiss franc money market investments, and 2.1% more than Swiss franc bonds, they noted.“It should still be possible for most funds to fund a substantial proportion of their pension benefits via the capital market,” they concluded. “To ensure this is the case, a regular check of the individual investment situation, for example through an asset-liability analysis, is becoming increasingly important.”The study can be found here . IPE’s November issue will feature pensions in Switzerlandlast_img read more

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