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Hospitals must treat, not discharge addicts

first_imgNew York state passed a law that allows for a 72-hour hold that is requested by the family of a patient brought in from an overdose. The state attorney general’s office has taken on the insurance companies, and this must be paid for. Insurance requirements for ambulatory detox services aren’t mandatory if those services aren’t readily available. If an ambulatory detox can’t be located for the patient, then the hospital stay will be covered by insurance.We are told that heroin detox isn’t a medical necessity because it’s not life threatening. Since when must a disease be life threatening to qualify for treatment? Tell this to the families of Tori Herr, David Stojcevski, Madison Jensen and others who died of the dehydration caused by unassisted withdrawal. Tell the families of patients who were refused treatment that became victims of a suicide or accidental overdose that their children were not a danger to themselves or others.We need detox in every hospital. The people who wish to be treated aren’t failing at treatment. The health care system is failing these sick and desperate individuals.Sue E. MartinSaratoga SpringsThe writer is a pharmacist, person in Long term recovery, Advocate with RAIS (Recovery Advocates In Saratoga). Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionAttention all hospitals: We have a national and statewide health care emergency. It’s an addiction epidemic, primarily an opiate crisis. We need you to take action. We need you to admit and treat, not discharge, the willing patients who arrive in your emergency rooms and hospitals in active withdrawal from opiates or dying from an overdose.I understand many hospitals’ protocol is to stabilize and discharge. The patient is referred to an outpatient treatment facility. But most of these programs don’t treat the withdrawal. I consider this practice to be wrong. Your patients are often returning to your care in a worse condition. They’re dying while waiting for a bed or seeking treatment. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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Take lesson from dog: Celebrate life

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionMy Logan is 10-year-old golden retriever. He is diabetic — two shots of insulin a day, now totally blind and full of allergies.  He finds tennis balls thrown into the snow with his nose. He is the happiest critter ever, having no idea how blind and disabled he is. He only knows his world and loves it.  God, if only we could learn a lesson from my Logan and celebrate life every day with the gifts from God we constantly receive. Arthur SalvatoreSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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Put Trump library at dump

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRe Jan. 29 letter, “Get Trump library in upstate New York”: I’d like to suggest the perfect location. How about next to the Joe Landry baseball field. Given the fact that they are mirror images of each other, I view this as something that our Niskayuna Town Board would unanimously agree upon.In my opinion, placing both of them on top of the Niskayuna landfill would be the perfect location.W.L. WertmanNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Puccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfectlast_img read more

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Plenty of reasons for mass shootings

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRe Feb. 14 letter, “Guns don’t up and kill by themselves”: James Homan gives a good, but fictional illustration that guns are inanimate tools that are only a problem when they get into the wrong hands. It takes a furious, unstable and/or innocently ignorant human being to pull the trigger. A gun can’t fire by itself. Suicide, accident or mass murder — the difference is basically a matter of numbers and publicity. Killing others is wrong, no matter how many bodies are involved. The Feb. 19 editorial cartoon was spot-on. Many persons and agencies dropped the ball regarding the Parkland high school shooter. The FBI didn’t follow up on several clues to his state of mind. Local law enforcement was called by his own mother and went to the home, but didn’t take further action. The school administration didn’t report expelling the young man for repeated aberrant behavior, in violation of the Florida state law that requires notification to authorities. Neighbors, for their own reasons, failed to report careless shooting of squirrels and their chickens in their own yards. Really, there was plenty of blame to go around, but none of it should fall on the rifle. It was merely the tool of demented destruction. Recent murders in our own region have been committed with: a hammer, a bath towel, a house fire and bare hands.Choice of weapons varies with plan, timing, convenience and motivation or state of mind. The AR-style or modem sporting rifle is one of the most popular firearms in the country, largely due to its ease of mastery. This reason, plus a relatively lower cost of manufacture, is why they were developed for the military. In spite of the rhetoric from over-zealous or ignorant media personnel and ambitious, unscrupulous politicians, the over-the counter AR is not an assault weapon. The real fault in Parkland and in many other cases is lack of communication, cooperation and proper enforcement of many existing laws, along with lazy, inefficient prosecution of unlawful firearms traffickers who are violating U.S. federal law and are allowed to plead to lesser state or local laws.Peter HenningsonSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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Rising from the ashes

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Ten years on

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5,329 respondents: Let the good times roll

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Activists, lawmakers criticize disclosure of personal information of COVID-19 patients

first_imgActivists and lawmakers have called for more considerate reporting on the country’s first confirmed coronavirus cases following the unprecedented disclosure of the patients’ personal information on social media platforms on Monday.In a statement issued on Monday, the Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) urged the media to respect the privacy of COVID-19 patients by not disclosing their personal identities or private information regarding their families or home addresses in order to prevent mass panic.The AJI also called on the press to speak to the most credible sources on the issue, as opposed to publishing “sensationalized” pieces on the patients and their families. “The government is obligated to provide accurate, credible and transparent information regarding COVID-19,” the organization further noted in the statement.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo announced on Monday that two Indonesians had tested positive for COVID-19, the first two confirmed cases of the disease in the country.Read also: War begins on coronavirusHe said the two women, a 64-year-old and her 31-year-old daughter, both residents of Depok, West Java, had been in contact with a Japanese citizen who tested positive in Malaysia on Feb. 27 after visiting Indonesia in early February. The President’s announcement was shortly followed by the posting of a report, which had purportedly originated from the Health Ministry, detailing the patients’ personal information, including their home address. The report has since circulated on social media, including WhatsApp groups.House of Representatives (DPR) lawmaker Charles Honoris has urged the government to ensure the privacy of its citizens in relation to the spread of the coronavirus, saying that privacy is one of the constitutional rights stipulated in the 1945 Constitution (UUD 1945).Read also: Bali quarantines nine foreign tourists who sat next to NZ COVID-19 patient in airplane“The mass disclosure of private information of coronavirus patients through social media or other platforms should be taken seriously as a violation of citizens’ privacy. The state must be able to respect the privacy of its citizens and close whatever loopholes have allowed such a violation to take place,” Charles said in a statement.He went on to say that the government must learn from Singapore and Japan in this regard, specifically how the two countries had implemented a zero-tolerance privacy policy to protect the personal lives of its confirmed COVID-19 patients.Indonesian Ombudsman (ORI) chairman Amzulian Rifai shared the sentiment, saying that he hoped the government would be able to explain the disclosure of the patients’ personal information since it was a matter of citizens’ privacy.“We have been overwhelmed with information. But which information should we trust? So much information is circulating on each of our phones, which is why the government must lead ahead in the front line to provide accurate information to prevent the public from panicking,” Amzulian said on Tuesday.Topics :last_img read more

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Bawaslu recommends postponing elections in areas affected by COVID-19

first_imgThe Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu) has recommended that the General Elections Commission (KPU) prepare for delays to the 2020 regional elections in areas where people have tested positive for COVID-19.Bawaslu head Abhan said Tuesday that the agency had sent a recommendation letter to the KPU on Monday, asking the commission to identify areas where “vote postponements” and “restaged votes” might take place.The terms pemilihan lanjutan (vote postponement) and pemilihan susulan (restaged vote), Abhan said, were stipulated in Law No. 10/2016 on regional elections. With a vote postponement, an ongoing election is scheduled for a later date after election organizers agree to halt it due to force majeure.With a restaged vote, the entire election process is redone from the start, also for reasons of force majeure.“The law doesn’t recognize a vote delay. Therefore, it’s important for the KPU to immediately map the areas where some election stages would still be feasible and the areas that would completely be unable to hold elections,” he said.Read also: Provinces, regencies holding elections in 2020 ‘highly vulnerable’ to disruption Areas the agency has identified as COVID-19 red zones are Bekasi, Depok, Cirebon and Purwakarta in West Java; Tangerang and South Tangerang in Banten; Surakarta in Central Java; Pontianak in West Kalimantan; Manado in North Sulawesi; Bali; and Yogyakarta.“The KPU should hold discussions with the relevant ministries on responding to the effects of the coronavirus, as well as issue a legal product as a guideline for us [Bawaslu] and the election participants,” Abhan said.He added that Bawaslu also recommended that the KPU implement a technical guideline for the mechanisms for each election stage with intensive communication between officials and voters.Bawaslu member M. Afifuddin said that Bawaslu, the KPU and the Election Organization Ethics Council (DKPP) would hold a joint meeting with the coordinating political, legal and security affairs minister and home minister on Wednesday to discuss the matter.Arwani Thomafi, the deputy chairman of the House of Representatives Commission II overseeing home affairs, agreed with Bawaslu’s recommendation, saying the KPU should immediately identify areas affected by the disease by coordinating with the relevant authorities.“A decision for a vote postponement or restaged vote in some regions should be based on objective conditions in the field; in this case, the mapping of areas exposed to the coronavirus,” the United Development Party (PPP) politician said.Read also: COVID-19: House, watchdog call for delay of regional electionsHouse Commission II deputy chairman Arif Wibowo said the 2020 regional elections should not be postponed entirely in all regions but only in the areas that were seriously affected.“We must see it case by case and measure it with accountable reasons. For example, we can look at an area’s election vulnerability index to mitigate conflict. There’s no need to delay an election in areas with good indexes,” said Arif, an Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) politician.Commission II chairman Ahmad Doli Kurnia of the Golkar Party urged the KPU not to be quick to delay a vote: “For the time being, just continue the stages of the elections that have been taking place. However, the KPU should limit activities involving large groups of people.”As of Tuesday, Indonesia had 172 confirmed COVID-19 cases, including in regions slated to hold the 2020 regional elections in September, such as Surakarta and Semarang in Central Java and Denpasar in Bali. At least five have died from the disease, while nine have recovered.Topics :last_img read more

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WHO insists it hid nothing, sounded virus alarm from start

first_imgThe virus, which emerged late last year in the Chinese city of Wuhan, has so far infected more than 2.4 million people globally and killed more than 165,000, according to an AFP tally.The United States has by far the highest death toll of any country, at more than 40,000 fatalities, and President Donald Trump has faced criticism over his handling of the pandemic.Washington is the biggest contributor to the WHO but Trump is freezing funding, alleging that the organization mismanaged and covered up the spread the virus.Tedros said the presence of embedded US government secondees working at the WHO headquarters in Geneva meant there was nothing being concealed from Washington. The World Health Organization insisted Monday that it sounded the alarm on the novel coronavirus right from the very start and had hidden nothing from Washington about the deadly pandemic.WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said there were no secrets at the UN agency after being blasted by the United States for allegedly downplaying the initial COVID-19 outbreak in China.”We have been warning from day one that this is a devil that everyone should fight,” Tedros told a virtual briefing in Geneva. The WHO said there were 15 staff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the US health protection agency, detailed specifically to work with the organization on its COVID-19 response.”Having CDC staff means there is nothing hidden from the US, from day one. Because these are Americans working with us. It just comes naturally and they tell what they are doing,” said Tedros.”WHO is open. We don’t hide anything. Not only for CDC, them sending messages, or others — we want all countries to get the same message immediately because that helps countries to prepare well and to prepare quickly.” Taiwan row The US State Department has said the WHO was too late in sounding the alarm over COVID-19 and is overly deferential to China.It questioned why it did not pursue a lead from Taiwan flagged up on December 31 about reports of atypical pneumonia in WuhanDebate has raged over the significance of Taiwan’s email, which informed the WHO of the reports from Wuhan, and of at least seven patients being isolated — something that would not be necessary for a non-infectious disease.The United States said Thursday it was “deeply disturbed that Taiwan’s information was withheld from the global health community, as reflected in the WHO’s Jan. 14, 2020 statement that there was no indication of human-to-human transmission”.But Tedros insisted that the WHO was already aware of reports emanating from Wuhan — and said Taiwan’s email was only seeking further information.”One thing that has to be clear is the first email was not from Taiwan. Many other countries were already asking for clarification. The first report came from Wuhan,” said Tedros.”Taiwan didn’t report any human-to-human transmission,” he stressed.WHO emergencies director Michael Ryan said the email made no reference to anything beyond what had already been reported in news media.”Clusters of atypical pneumonia are not uncommon. There are millions of cases of atypical pneumonia around the world in any given year,” he explained.Ryan said that the WHO tweeted the existence of the event in Wuhan on January 4, and on January 5 provided “detailed information on the epidemic” which all countries could access.Tedros also urged leaders not to exploit the pandemic for their own political capital.”Don’t use this virus as an opportunity to fight against each other or score political points,” he said.”It’s like playing with fire. It’s the political problem that may fuel further this pandemic.” Topics :last_img read more

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