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Club sponsors autism conference

first_imgNotre Dame’s Special Friends Club will hold its fifth annual Autism Conference on Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the Carey Auditorium of the Hesburgh Library.Vanderbilt pediatrics professor and Notre Dame alumna Julie Lounds Taylor will give a talk titled “Understanding the Transition to Adulthood with Autism Spectrum Disorder.”Sophomore Thomas Gordon, a member of the Special Friends Club, said Taylor is a leader in examining how people with autism interact with the rest of society.“Dr. Taylor’s research program investigates how individual, family and societal factors interact to promote healthy development, and she is especially interested in how families experience the transition to adulthood for young adults affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD),” Gordon said.Gordon said the Special Friends  Club aims to bring speakers to the conference who have made a significant commitment to fighting autism.“The beauty of the Autism Conference is the professionals invited to speak at the event,” he said.“Past speakers have represented a group of individuals who have impacted the knowledge we have of ASD through their research and a lifelong commitment to helping us come closer to understanding ASD.”The Special Friends Club’s president, senior Christina Mondi said our society needs to develop better strategies for supporting autistic individuals and their families.“According to the [Center for Disease Control], roughly 1 [out of] 88 children will be diagnosed with ASD,” Mondi said. “Almost all students will inevitably have a family member, friend, colleague, classmate or neighbor affected by autism. … It is incredibly important that students be aware not only of what autism is, but of how they can play a role in supporting those whose lives and families are affected by it in the classroom, workplace and community. This is not a special interest topic.”The Notre Dame community can help make the transition to adulthood for people with autism smoother, Mondi said.“If individuals with ASD are to reach their fullest potentials as they move into adulthood, they will need the understanding and support of their classmates and community members in doing so,” she said. “This is an area where we, as young college students and emerging professionals, could make a real difference in forging a culture of acceptance for our peers affected by ASD.”The event is open and free for all students. For more information, visit the conference’s website.Tags: Autism conference, Special friends clublast_img read more

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Young Scholars 2013

first_imgMore than 80 Georgia high school students gained real-world research experience this summer through the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ (CAES) Young Scholars program.For the past 16 years, the program has paired researchers in the CAES, the College of Pharmacy and the College of Veterinary Medicine with high school students to foster their love of science.Access to state-of-the-art equipmentNot many high school biology or chemistry labs have the equipment needed to isolate and analyze the genome of a crop fungus or gas spectrometers to parse out the compounds that make an onion sweet. Young Scholars have access to high tech equipment like this through the program. The students conducted experiments during the two-month program to address novel and interesting questions. Some will even have their work published before they graduate from high school, which gives them a leg up in their scientific careers. “It really expanded the kind of careers that I’ve thought about,” said Theresa Vencill, a second-year Young Scholar who graduated from Cedar Shoals High School this spring. “Originally, I wanted to do biology and maybe teach or something. “But being here and seeing the different professors that are here and what they do and the different aspects of science, it’s really made me think, ‘Do I want to do field work? Do I want to do lab studies? Do I want to be a teacher?’ It’s really expanded my knowledge of what science is.” Vencill worked with CAES entomologist Nancy Hinkle in testing the effectiveness of pesticides used in poultry houses. Learning from UGA scientists“One of the things they’re seeing here is, by doing this, these scientists are just people,” said CAES Dean J. Scott Angle. “They’re here to help and want these young people to be successful. They can become their friends and their mentors.”Not all Young Scholars pursue careers in science, but the experience of working in a research laboratory can benefits students who go into the liberal arts as well. “Engaging in research and understanding how research is correctly done is learning how to ask good questions and solve problems,” said John Sherwood, professor and head of the UGA Department of Plant Pathology and assistant dean for diversity relations for the CAES. “These are skills that are useful in many aspects of one’s life. Additionally, as policy and science are often mixed in the news, understanding how scientific information was obtained that is being used in a policy discussion can help an individual make informed decisions regarding that policy.”Began in GriffinThe Young Scholars program began on the UGA Griffin Campus in 1989 and was originally geared to provide a collegiate experience to students who were not planning to attend college. Since then the program has expanded to include UGA’s main campus in Athens and the UGA Tifton Campus. The program strives to select students that are truly ready to engage in real world research and match them to projects of potential interest. Because of this experience, many Young Scholars continue their research careers when at UGA as undergraduates through the college’s undergraduate research program. Third-year Young Scholars will round out there experience by traveling to UGA’s Costa Rica Campus this week for an international experience.For more information about the Young Scholars Program, visit www.ysp.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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MMH leader elected to national post

first_imgBatesville, In. — Caravan Health congratulates Tim Putnam, DHA on his election as the 2018 President-Elect of the National Rural Health Association (NRHA). Dr. Putnam, who is a Caravan Health director and co-founder, will serve as the 2019 NRHA President.Lynn Barr, Caravan Health chief executive officer said, “We are proud to have a member of our team elected to such an important position within NRHA. We know he will have great success leading NRHA.”Dr. Putnam has been instrumental in Caravan Health’s work developing rural hospitals into ACOs,  demonstrating that rural facilities can excel in accountable care.  Under Caravan Health’s ACO model, rural providers have achieved savings, improved quality of care and lowered overall costs. With over 250 hospital partners and serving more than 1 million beneficiaries, Caravan is proud of the many rural hospitals it supports.Lisa Kilawee, Caravan Health vice president of strategic alliances and 2016 NRHA President, commented that “Dr. Putnam’s leadership over NRHA will be a boon to NRHA and its 21,000 members, and the association’s mission to provide leadership on rural health issues through advocacy, communications, education, and research. His strong leadership will benefit rural health providers and facilities facing future challenges, including the move away from a fee-for-service payment model to value-based models.”With over 30 years of healthcare experience, Dr. Putnam is a nationally recognized rural health care leader and lifetime advocate for rural hospitals, healthcare transformation and innovation. He currently serves as President and CEO of Margaret Mary Health in Batesville, Indiana.last_img read more

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The Latest: Alabama veterans preach caution to teammates

first_img“We’re not in the position today to guarantee it will happen, but we can promise to make every effort to get there. We owe that to our student-athletes, our athletic departments and our institutions,” ASUN Commissioner Ted Gumbart said in a statement.League schools may continue with such activities like training and practice in accordance with NCAA, local and state guidelines.The nine-team league operates mostly in the Southeast and does not play football. It is formally known as the Atlantic Sun Conference. ___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports He was removed on Friday and took part in his first practice.Crosby is being counted on to contribute much more after recording 10 sacks as a rookie. He is slated to be a starting defensive end and is the top pass rusher on a team that has struggled to generate consistent pressure in recent years.___The ASUN Conference says it is postponing all fall sports because of the coronavirus pandemic.The announcement from the ASUN’s Presidents’ Council on Friday also says that providing a spring season for men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer and volleyball is a priority. Associated Press Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___Alabama running back Najee Harris is hoping he and his teammates can deal with 12 weeks “of just really trying to be safe.” The Crimson Tide star and other veterans have preached caution to teammates while also remaining steadfast on wanting to play this season amid the pandemic.“We try to tell them don’t go to parties, but like it’s kind of hard to tell somebody not to go to a party in college,” Harris said during a Zoom call. “We understand it, but we’re kind of just telling them, ‘If you do go to a party, like make sure you guys are overly safe.’”That means wearing a mask, keeping distance from others and not picking up items after others, “because what you do plays a part in what happens to the whole team.”Alabama and other Southeastern Conference team open preseason camps on Monday ahead of a season that has already been pushed back to Sept. 26. They’re set to only play league games.“Every day we take risks, and it might be a little risky,” Tide quarterback Mac Jones said. “But we feel comfortable and we feel safe.” But the coronavirus pandemic scuttled those plans and hit the Hall so hard that it eliminated several full-time positions and cut senior management pay in the 25-40% range.Hall of Fame President and CEO John Doleva says the rescheduled enshrinement festivities, the diminished museum visitation and the uncertainty regarding the Hall’s college and high school basketball events this fall “has forced us to make these very difficult decisions.” Mohegan Sun is a long-time partner of the Hall. Doleva says it can a operate a “near-bubble” to provide a secure environment for guests.___Charleston Southern is suspending its 2020 football season. The school is part of the Division I Big South Conference and competes in the Football Championship Subdivision. August 14, 2020center_img Marshall and East Carolina have moved their football game from Aug. 29 to Sept. 12. Both teams had Sept. 12 as an open date after earlier opponents changed their schedules. Marshall was supposed to host Atlantic Coast Conference opponent Pittsburgh that day while East Carolina was traveling to play South Carolina of the Southeastern Conference. The game will be held at East Carolina’s Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. No time for the game has been determined.___North Carolina State has administered 1,360 tests for COVID-19 to athletes, coaches and athletic staff with just eight people testing positive. The Latest: Alabama veterans preach caution to teammates The update came Friday with the school saying that out of the last 765 tests administered since it last released results, only one person has come up positive for the coronavirus.___Kobe Bryant and the rest of this year’s Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame class won’t be inducted in 2020 — or at the birthplace of basketball.The Hall announced Friday that the enshrinement ceremony will be held May 13-15, 2021, and the entire festivities will be moved to Mohegan Sun Casino in Connecticut.This year was to be a highlight for the Hall of Fame, located in Springfield, Massachusetts. Bryant, killed in January in a helicopter crash, headlined a decorated class featuring Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett that would have been enshrined in the recently renovated museum. The Big South and the NCAA have canceled its plans for a fall championship, although the league did let member institutions play non-conference games if they wanted in the fall.Charleston Southern said in it statement Friday the environment with COVID-19 was too “uncertain” to go forward in the fall. The school said the decision will let the football team prepare for games in the spring.___The Las Vegas Raiders have taken edge rusher Maxx Crosby off the reserve/COVID-19 list.Crosby was placed on the list last week. The list was created for players who either test positive for COVID-19 or have been in close contact with an infected person. ___The Houston Texans won’t have fans at their home opener on Sept. 20 against the Baltimore Ravens.The Texans added on Friday they have yet to decide if fans will be allowed to attend games later in the season. The Texans say a decision on fans attending games this season will be dictated by the COVID-19 pandemic in the Houston area, which is currently a hotspot.___last_img read more

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Professor remembered for lifetime in academia

first_imgPaulette Chandler, a lecturer in French language and culture at USC, died unexpectedly on March 7 following a medical procedure.“She’ll be really missed. It’s hard for us, as a department, to learn the news and realize that she’s no longer with us,” said Julia Chamberlin, a senior lecturer of French language and culture.After earning her Ph.D. in French literature at USC in 1992, Chandler went on to teach in the Department of French and Italian for 24 years. Before joining USC’s faculty full-time, she also taught at many other local institutions, including the California Institute of Technology and University of California, Los Angeles.“She was very dedicated to USC. She was always here, even on days when she wasn’t teaching — she would be on campus, meeting with students, and trying to do as much as she could to help out her students and do the best she could as a teacher,” Chamberlin said.Chandler was an accomplished scholar who regularly presented her work on French literature at conferences and was active in USC’s chapter of the national French honor society Pi Delta Phi.“I lost a friend and a piece of France anchored in L.A.,” Nathalie Burle, a senior lecturer of French language and culture, said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “Dr. Chandler was an accomplished linguist and scholar of French, and her students appreciated her for enriching their lives and providing them with an in-depth knowledge of the French language and cultures that very few can provide. It would be an honor if USC could pay tribute to her hard work by giving her posthumously the recognition she deserved.”Her colleagues will remember her for the kindness, enthusiasm and generosity that she showed to her friends and students.“She always had a smile on her face and cared so much for the people with whom she worked that she not only remembered their birthdays, but always greeted them with flowers, chocolates and kind words. She could be counted on to cultivate an esprit de corps, not just among her students, but as a collegial presence within the department,” Sherry Velasco, the chair of the Department of French and Italian, said in an email to the Daily Trojan.Her constant optimism and sense of style served as a source of inspiration for those around her.“One of the things that really struck me about her was that she really, really never had a bad day. You could never tell if she was having a hard day or if she was upset about anything, because she was always smiling and never complained about anything,” said Lorena Gallego, a senior lecturer in Spanish language and culture. “The way I will remember her is how stylish, fashionable she was, and how she never had a single bad day.”Gallego cited Chandler’s kindness as the enduring legacy that she will leave behind at USC.“She represented USC very well. She had all the positive qualities that Trojans stand for,” Gallego said. “She was really just a wonderful, wonderful person.”Chandler is survived by her husband, Richmond Chandler.The Department of French and Italian will be holding a memorial service for Chandler from 4 to 6 p.m. on Wednesday in Doheny Memorial Library, room 240.last_img read more