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FIFA World Cup 18: Mexico Vs South Korea Preview

first_imgAdvertisement(Photo Credits: The Sun)Mexico will look to seal their spot in the knockout stages with a win over Asian Giants South Korea today at the Rostov Arena in Rostov-on-Don.Mexico shocked World Cup holders Germany with a 1-0 victory in their first group game, and the second matchday will go a long way to deciding who makes the last 16 of the tournament. The last time South Korea and Mexico met was in 1998, with the El Tri winning it 3-1 in the group stages.If stats are to believed then Mexico looks strong on paper as they have won all of their World Cup games against Asian teams. While on paper South Korea looks quite weak as they are winless in their last seven World Cup games, losing their last three match in a row. The Asian underdogs have failed to score in their last three World Cup games.Mexico feels very comfortable playing with possession of the ball, which means counterattacks and set pieces will matter in this battle. Let’s see how this game unfolds.Here are squads for the game:Meanwhile, in Rostov-on-Don… We have the teams for #KORMEX!#WorldCup pic.twitter.com/fS5ufeqSot— FIFA World Cup 🏆 (@FIFAWorldCup) June 23, 2018 Advertisementlast_img read more

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Greece looks to Australia for structural reform

first_imgGreece has been shown how they can achieve structural reforms if they follow Australia’s model. The event ‘Structural Reform: An Australian Success Story’ was held in Athens this week, and was organised by the Australian Embassy, the Hellenic-Australian Business Council (HABC) and the Foundation for Economic and Industrial Research (IOBE) to promote positive changes in the Hellenic Republic. Visiting Professor Gary Banks, Dean of the School of Government of Australia and New Zealand (ANZSOG) and former Chairman of the Australian Productivity Commission, spoke at the event which was also addressed by the Australian Ambassador to Greece Ms Jenny Bloomfield and IOBE chairman Odiseas Kyriakopoulos. Ms Bloomfield referred to the social and economic stability currently enjoyed by Australia, as a result of the most extensive economic and social reforms in decades, and the opening of the Australian economy to competition. She stressed the role of Professor Banks as one of the most influential scientists of Australia, Chairman of the Productivity Commission in Australia’s effort to implement the structural changes that have ensured economic and social stability for two decades. “In Australia, through the will of the political leadership, technocratic and scientific support institutions such as the Productivity Commission and a broad social consensus, we conducted a national debate that allowed us to formulate a shared vision for the future of our country. We drew a roadmap for the implementation of radical changes that have led to economic growth.The important lesson of our experience is that the future of any country lies in the hands of its citizens,” Ms Bloomfield said. Odiseas Kyriakopoulos referred to the significant progress made in fiscal adjustment and emphasized the key role of structural change for the country’s return to a growth path. “It is certainly obvious that reform experiences cannot simply be transplanted from country to country, but we can learn important things from the experiences of other countries such as Australia,” Mr Kyriacopoulos said. In his speech, Professor Banks referred to the strategy and challenges encountered to achieve the transition of Australia from the protectionist regime to a free market. According to Professor Banks, a change in Australia’s model of economic operation was dictated by the decline of the economy. In 1950 the Australian economy was in fourth place, according to the classification by OECD, dropping to 14th place in 1983. The implementation of reforms in the early 1980s and the liberalization of markets and the economy, allowed Australia to regain lost competitiveness and in 2010 the economy was back in 5th place (OECD). Referring to the obstacles encountered in the course of the effort, he said that there is a lag between cost, which is usually immediate, and benefits, which are achieved in the long run. He also noted that, while the cost of a reform is specific, the benefits may cover a much wider range of factors. Professor Banks also referred to a series of innovative public institutions in Australia, which contributed decisively to supporting reforms such as the Productivity Commission and the Office of Best Practice Regulation. Australia’s Productivity Commission is an independent government agency that examines discriminatory policies, programs and regulatory actions, and provides research and consulting services regarding reforms that serve the long-term national interest. The Commission has an advisory role for a wide range of activities including issues of sectoral support and trade policies, regulatory frameworks for infrastructure and public services, competition and consumer regulation, labour market reforms, social and environmental programs, reduction of bureaucracy in the business industry and productivity issues. John Kalogirou, Professor of Economic Technological and Industrial Strategy at NTUA, referred to the importance of the international transfer of knowledge and experience on both the design and implementation of public policies to improve the productivity and competitiveness of the Greek economy. He stressed the urgent need to develop a strategy to improve the competitive position of the Greek economy. Professor Nikos Vettas, Athens University of Economics and Business, referred to the growth and productivity increase program in Australia and noted similarities and significant differences from the Greek case. In Greece’s case, according to Mr Vettas, design and implementation of such a policy has been relatively much less important than the fiscal adjustment. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Great Marketers Are Great Skeptics 3 Assumptions You Need to Stop Making

first_imgYou know what they say about assumptions. I’ve been guilty of making my own marketing assumptions once or twice in my time, and if there’s one thing I’ve learned from getting proven wrong, it’s that great marketers need to be great skeptics.Earlier this month, I attended the always insightful SearchLove Conference hosted by Distilled. One of my favorite presentations (as always) came from none other than Moz’s Rand Fishkin.Rand opened up day two with a talk on how we as marketers need to position ourselves in order to be successful. Plainly stated: we need to be more skeptical.During his presentation (see below), Rand outlined how the “crap” skeptic, the “good” skeptic, and the “great” skeptic are all set apart by a few defining qualities. In our industry, it’s really easy to follow the latest and greatest revelations posted on places like Moz or KISSmetrics (or OpenView Labs!). But while having data, benchmarks, and the best real-world advice can be extremely helpful, as we all know, every business is different. Just because this information exists out there on the Internet doesn’t mean we should hold ourselves to another company’s results, or worse, go chasing after the next shiny object. We have to do what makes sense for our business and, more importantly, we must always be skeptical of making assumptions — even if those assumptions are partially based on hard evidence.[slideshare id=33269102&doc=great-marketers-skeptics-arial-140408072813-phpapp02]3 Marketing Assumptions You Need to Stop Making Now1) The more a piece of content is shared, the more engaging it must beIs this universally true? Nope. Rand presented some stats on a test he ran on one of his own posts. He found that one post, which got more than 701 social signals, ended up getting only 306 page views. Say what? I know that from a marketing standpoint, I’m always harping on the importance of measuring both traffic and social signals — we all should, right? And for some reason, I’ve tended to place a lot of importance on the number of social shares to measure engagement on the actual post. That’s the engagement metric we use after all, right?Well, wrong. According to Rand’s results, those are just assumptions that may seem logical, but the metrics show otherwise. Ultimately, he and others have found that the amount of time someone is willing to dedicate to a particular post depends on a variety of factors like timing, source, formatting, and others. So, if you’re really serious about measuring smart metrics you need to ask some questions.A great skeptic needs to ask: What other factors are at work? How can we test this by keeping as many variables as possible the same?2) More testing means better performanceNot always. Rand pulled from another study that dove into the performance metrics of landing pages from Wordstream. My assumption would be that if I’m testing a ton of different elements on a landing page, for example, I’ll then be able to optimize my landing pages better than any marketer in the world. No? No. The study found that the amount of testing on a landing page did not always yield better conversion rate. To that end, sometimes tests become a waste of your time because the results of what you’re testing (say, the color of a subscribe button) aren’t going to make as big an impact as you think they will. At the very least, they may not make enough of an impact to justify the amount of time and resources you spent simply testing it!A great skeptic needs to ask: Is this the most meaningful test we can run right now?3) Once you get conclusive data on a test, you’re doneWrong again. Like many people, when I’m running a test, I’m looking for results that I can really feel good about. I want something definitive. Most good marketers aren’t going to go all-in on new findings unless they are statistically meaningful, but even some of the more experienced marketers do tend to commit this one testing sin — taking meaningful data from one test and stopping there.Rand presented his findings from the following test on the performance of anchor text vs. standard link text:Rand test conditionsUltimately, what he found after a few tries was that anchor text drove a more powerful jump in SERPs for the target keyword and URL. From there, a crap skeptic might say: good enough for me! The good skeptic will say: let’s try one more test. And the great skeptic? They’ll push until you get definitive results from at least three different tests.This may sound like a lot of work (because it is), but with the number of variables at play in the marketing space, we can’t afford to make assumptions without testing the heck out of it — even if that means spending time and resources just to make sure.A great skeptic needs to ask: Have we run enough tests to be sure?So, What Marketing Assumptions Are You Making?Following Rand’s talk, there is no question that I felt a little stressed about the need to challenge each and every assumption I might have as a marketer. But the reality is this: you need to question everything and it’s your job as a marketer to choose which tests, which projects, and what amount of work will be the MOST meaningful to your overall strategy. You can’t take on everything and you surely can’t rely on every assumption, but what you can do is pose a question to yourself with each and every marketing move.Tell me, do you think you’re skeptical enough?Image by Duncan HallAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more