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Grandmother attacked man with crutch after snowball row

first_imgA grandmother attacked a young man with her crutch after a row over a snowball fight.Maria Sava appeared at Letterkenny District Court in Co Donegal today charged with assault Jordan Gibson. Garda Sinead McLaughlin heard how there had been a disturbance between a number of people at The Green, Convoy on December 8th, 2017.There had been an incident involving snowballs being thrown and Ms Sava came out of a house nearby.She began swinging her crutch about and struck Mr Gibson in the leg.When he began remonstrating with Ms Sava, aged 54, she then slapped him in the face.Mr Gibson said he did not receive hospital treatment but did have red marks on his leg and his face.Solicitor for Ms Sava, Mr Patsy Gallagher called the case ‘Grannygate’ saying matters escalated when they should not have.“She was swinging the crutch and she knows now that she should not have been. She reacted and it was unfortunate,” he said.A video taken on a phone of the assault was shown to Judge Kelly.The court heard that Ms Sava, from Glenfinn Street, Ballybofey, is on disability allowance and was using a crutch to walk into court.Judge Paul Kelly instructed Ms Sava to pay a witness in the case, Andrew Ponsonby €100 as he had travelled from Dundalk to give evidence.He then applied the probation act to Ms Sava in relation to the charge fo assault.Grandmother attacked man with crutch after snowball row was last modified: September 22nd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:assaultconvoyCrutchFightMaria SavaSnowballlast_img read more

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Henry David Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin Led to Loss of Belief in God

first_imgFor a thoroughly-documented yet disturbing tableau of the pernicious effects of Darwinian thinking on all aspects of society, we recommend one of Dr Bergman’s most recent books, How Darwinism Corrodes Morality (2017).(Visited 848 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The effects of Darwinism go far beyond biology. On the bicentenary of Henry David Thoreau, a historian traces his fall from grace into Darwinian materialism.by Dr Jerry BergmanNovels and literature can be critically important avenues for changing Western culture. Most surveys find that more people read fiction and stories in general, such as historical fiction and romance, than nonfiction of all types. Fiction has a huge impact on our beliefs for this and other reasons.What is nature? A product of design, exalting life, or chance, demeaning it? Photo by David CoppedgeIn Concord, Massachusetts this year, on July 11, a bicentennial celebration will be held for Henry David Thoreau, a giant American literary figure known for advocating the romantic ideal of a simple life surrounded by the beauty of nature. In an article in Nature, Randall Fuller traces Thoreau’s debt to Darwin after Walden, watching him fall from the grace of nature’s sublime design to a material world of chance.Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was one of the most important American writers. He is best known today for his book Walden, that stressed the benefits of simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for disobeying unjust actions of government. He was a prolific author whose works have been a staple of American education from high school to college for decades. Along with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bronson Alcott (the father of Louisa May Alcott), Thoreau and his circle of friends were writers with wide influence. But another writer would come to heavily influence them all: Charles Darwin.[i]For example, up to this time Thoreau accepted transcendentalism, the view that asserts the primacy of the spiritual and transcendental over the material. But then, his reading of Darwin’s Origin began to severely challenge this worldview for which he was best known, Fuller says.[ii] Many other leading early American writers and clergy, after they understood “Darwin’s theory of natural selection … discover[ed] that it also posed enormous threats to their other beliefs, including their faith in God and their trust that America was a country divinely chosen for the regeneration of the world.”[iii] Thoreau had to face these issues head on just five years after he had published Walden in 1854. (He died of tuberculosis in 1862 at age 45, three years after Darwin’s Origin had arrived in America.)This process can be wrenching; it leaves people trapped between two ways of thinking and believing, stranded between two existences.Due to the influence of Darwin, Thoreau moved “close to Darwin’s position. He assumed the universe was governed by laws, but he also believed that the products of those laws occurred in a more or less random way. He hovered between design and chance, between idealism and materialism.”[iv] In the end, Thoreau rejected the transcendentalism for which he had been famous, and placed the mystery and wonder of life within the worldview of materialism. Nonetheless, Thoreau realized that empirical knowledge is finite, and afterwe have exhausted its limits, we are still left with speculation, supposition, and hypotheses. And those are invariably influenced by belief in some ordering principle. For many people, that principle involves a divinity inherited from four thousand years of tradition.[v]He was speaking, of course, of the influence of the Bible as the “ordering principle” that influenced “many people”. But for himself? He was raising questions and having doubts. Even Darwin had faced similar doubts as he discussed the implications of his theory with a close friend. For example, in an early draft of his Origin of Species, Darwin wrotethat nature was composed of “laws ordained by God to govern the universe.” Soon after sending his book to Asa Gray, he wrote, “I am inclined to look at everything as resulting from designed laws, with the details whether good or bad, left to the working out of what we may call chance.” (Within a year or so he would abandon the idea of design entirely; it was unnecessary, he realized, for his theory.).[vi]Darwin’s dangerous idea led to the two camps still existing today, namely those who advocate Intelligent Design and creationism, and the other camp that has chosen Darwinism as the explanation for all living things, and thus dispenses with any need for design or guiding intelligence to explain the origin and development of life.Fuller says that Darwin’s theory of natural selection maintains that all life evolves largely as a result of the environment, “thriving or dying as a result of their ability to adapt. This process can be wrenching; it leaves people trapped between two ways of thinking and believing, stranded between two existences.”[vii]  He concludes that, in the end, Darwin’s theory has “remade the world” from the Christian era to the Post-Christian world.[viii]Darwinism had a major influence on America not only through his own writings, but through other influential writers like Thoreau who converted to Darwinism after reading Darwin’s Origin of Species. Because Darwin had raised fundamental questions about the nature of life, his influence permeated novels and other works of literature, converting the man best known for transcendentalism and the sublimity of nature into a materialist seeing his formerly-sublime world as the product of mindless chance.In summary, Darwin’s 1859 book was “the single most important idea of the nineteenth century,” Fuller says. “It is also an account of issues and concerns that are still very much with us, including racism, one of the most intractable problems in American life, and the enduring conflict between science and religion.” [ix] And that was the very book that turned Thoreau into a Darwin disciple. Thereafter, his tainted pen helped spread Darwinism to the masses.For more on Randall Fuller’s research into Darwin’s influence on Thoreau and the Transcendentalists, see Evolution News & Science Today.[i] Randall Fuller “Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin.” Nature. June 15, 2017. 546:349-350.[ii] Randall Fuller “Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin.” Nature. June 15, 2017. p. 349.[iii] The Book That Changed America: How Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation, by Randall Fuller, New York: Viking. 2017. p. x.[iv] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[v] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[vi] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[vii] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.[viii] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.[ix] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, scientist, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. For more of his writings, see his Author Profile.last_img read more

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Scientific Discoveries Can Cast Doubt on Long-Held Beliefs

first_imgYou have to look beneath the surface veneer of bluffing in science news to see how the sausage is made before it gets packaged to the press.At best, science is tentative. Any consensus is vulnerable to overthrow by new findings. This may sound like a recipe for progress, but the new findings themselves are vulnerable to overthrow down the road. Obviously some progress is being made, particularly in engineering: that’s why cell phone cameras keep getting better. The more remote from reproducibility a scientific theory is, though, the more vulnerable to overhaul or replacement. Here are some examples of long-held beliefs coming under doubt.The amyloid hypothesis on trial (Nature). In a special series on Alzheimer’s Disease, Nature finds that long-held hypotheses about amyloid tangles causing the malady are ripe for reconsideration. “As the development of treatments for Alzheimer’s disease continues to stumble, is it time for researchers to broaden their list of the condition’s potential causes?”Yosemite granite ‘tells a different story’ story [sic] about Earth’s geologic history: Finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form (Science Daily). Explaining granite has long been a challenge, but the best hypotheses fail to account for one of America’s most famous national parks, Yosemite. The repercussions extend to the whole globe, and to what geologists think they know:A team of scientists including Carnegie’s Michael Ackerson and Bjorn Mysen revealed that granites from Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystallized at much lower temperatures than previously thought possible. This finding upends scientific understanding of how granites form and what they can teach us about our planet’s geologic history. …“These granites tell a different story,” Ackerson added. “And it could rewrite what we think we understand about how Earth’s continents form.”These findings could influence our understanding of the conditions in which the Earth’s crust first formed during the Hadean and Archean. They could also explain some recent observations about the temperature at which volcanic magmas exist before eruption and the mechanisms through which economically important ore deposits form.Discovery of a silicate rock-boring organism and macrobioerosion in fresh water (Nature Communications). Fossil hunters are going to have to give up one of their diagnostic instruments. “In paleontology, the presence of rocks with boreholes and fossil macroboring assemblage members is one of the primary diagnostic features of shallow marine paleo-environments,” this paper warns: “…Our findings highlight that rocks with macroborings are not an exclusive indicator of marine paleo-ecosystems, but may also reflect freshwater habitats.”Yellowstone super-volcano has a different history than previously thought (Science Daily). Perhaps you’ve seen the diagrams of Yellowstone’s caldera migrating across a mantle plume. Now a Virginia Tech geoscientist offers a different story: “Yellowstone super-volcano eruptions were produced by gigantic ancient oceanic plate.” Researchers indirectly found a structure under the volcano that contradicts the plume theory. “In this research, there was no evidence of heat coming directly up from the Earth’s core to power the surface volcano at Yellowstone,” one author said. Were you told that this? “It has always been a problem there, and scientists have tried to come up with different ways to explain the cause of Yellowstone volcanoes, but it has been unsuccessful.”Local Winds Play Key Role in Some Megafires (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Before blaming wildfires on climate change, look what scientists at JPL found about one of the biggest recent megafires, the 2014 King Fire in the Sierra Nevadas:Although drought and overgrown forests are often blamed for major fires in the western United States, new research using unique NASA before-and-after data from a megafire site indicates that highly localized winds sometimes play a much larger role — creating large, destructive fires even when regional winds are weak….“This brings into question several widely held and largely unquestioned assumptions, such as very large fires being caused by the accumulation of vegetation, persistent dry conditions, or requiring extreme conditions,” said NCAR scientist Janice Coen, the lead author of the study. In the King Fire, she pointed out, “Small-scale winds and winds generated by the fire had a much greater impact on this fire, and potentially others like it, than any of the other factors.“High glucose spikes are common in ‘healthy’ people (Science Daily). Are ‘sugar highs’ a bad thing, a warning sign of diabetes? In some people they are, but Stanford researchers were surprised to find, when they monitored glucose levels over time, “that ‘normal’ blood glucose levels are often not normal at all—they stray much farther from the healthy ranges than we assumed.” Results in 57 individuals showed large fluctuations and spikes in normal people. “We were very surprised to see blood sugar in the prediabetic and diabetic range in these people so frequently” said Michael Snyder, PhD, Professor and Chair of Genetics at Stanford and senior author of the study.Cross species transfer of genes has driven evolution (Phys.org). The implications of this article for evolutionary theory are inestimable. If what they say is correct, that organisms are borrowing genetic information, what happens to all those stories about mutations, natural selection and survival of the fittest?Far from just being the product of our parents, University of Adelaide scientists have shown that widespread transfer of genes between species has radically changed the genomes of today’s mammals, and been an important driver of evolution.In the world’s largest study of so-called “jumping genes”, the researchers have traced two particular jumping genes across 759 species of plants, animals and fungi. These jumping genes are actually small pieces of DNA that can copy themselves throughout a genome and are known as transposable elements.They have found that cross-species transfers, even between plants and animals, have occurred frequently throughout evolution.Along this line, Evolution News has been reporting on a new paper by Winston Ewert in the ID journal Bio-Complexity that explains the nested hierarchy of organisms far better than Darwin’s “tree of life” concept. The new Dependency Graph Hypothesis, which includes shared modules, fits the actual genomic data better than Darwinism by orders of magnitude, Cornelius Hunter says. The paper is creating quite a stir in ID circles, the fallout of which remains to be seen.Humans did not stem from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa (Science Daily). We’re so accustomed to hearing “everything you know is wrong” about human evolution, this one may not rise above the din. It complicates the “Out of Africa” hypothesis that has been taught as fact for decades, though. Darren Curnoe at The Conversation says that the story of human origins is getting “dizzyingly complicated” with the realization that hybridization has probably occurred often between groups. Chris Stringer comments, “As with the material culture, we do see a continental-wide trend towards the modern human form, but different modern features appear in different places at different times, and some archaic features are present until remarkably recently.” How is that a trend?In his book Darwin Retried, journalist Norman Macbeth discovered a new logical fallacy he termed the “best-in-field fallacy.” Noticing how often Darwinists rationalized their contradictions with the excuse that Darwinism was the “best theory we have” for origins, he noted that the “best” theory may not be a “good” theory. It may the best of the worst, the least lame horse in the race.Some of the most common words we find in our science reporting: overturn, challenge, upend, question, complicated, remarkable, rewrite, assumptions, radical, and other such words that weaken the feeling citizens should have about scientific “understanding.” Remember how long Ptolemy’s neat system was unquestioned by scientists? About 1,500 years. (Visited 650 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Fiery Social Music Startup JamLegend Mysteriously Announces Closure

first_imgGuide to Performing Bulk Email Verification marshall kirkpatrick Related Posts A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoscenter_img JamLegend, a site where people challenge each other to music-playing duels, announced this evening on its blog that it will close its service at the end of this month. No clear reason for the closure was provided.JamLegend launched in 2008 and built up a registered userbase of 2 million people, the company said tonight. Many of those users were fiercely loyal, some even posted stories and poems about their discovery of the service – before the announcement of the site’s closure! JamLegend received very favorable press attention from ReadWriteWeb, GigaOm, VentureBeat, TechCrunch and Mashable. Millions of users (some paying for premium accounts), intense loyalty, a big pile of favorable press – if JamLegend isn’t closing because it’s lead its founders to better opportunities I’d be surprised. Their heads can’t be hanging too low. We’ll be watching to see where the team shows up next. None have new jobs listed on their LinkedIn profiles. CEO Andrew Lee, according to his Twitter profile, has gone from San Francisco to Washington DC (for the National Wildlife Federation’s Young Leader’s Assembly) to Spain in the last week. Sounds like a guy taking a well-deserved vacation after 3 years of rock. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#news#social networks#web last_img read more

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A Contest for Helping the Planet

first_imgLog on and help save the planet. That, at least, is the basic idea behind EarthHack, an online contest in which anyone can suggest how to use existing technologies in slightly different ways to reduce global carbon emissions and move toward more sustainable energy sources.EarthHack can be found Marblar, what Earthhack organizers call a “global crowdsourcing platform,” a means of gathering ideas from a large group of people online.“People are looking for affordable and simple solutions to help them live a more sustainable life at home,” EarthHack’s home page says. “But unfortunately, many sustainable products and solutions are priced at a premium. Moreover, there are many existing technologies that have been developed for other purposes that can be re-imaged as sustainable solutions.”Ideas collected now will be reduced to finalists on Aug. 1, with final submissions by Sept. 4, and the presentation of the winning idea in New York City during Climate Week Sept. 23 through 29. The winner gets $15,000. Turning ideas into realityThe winner gets a wad of cash and a free ride to New York City. Second and third place finishers also win cash awards.As interesting, EarthHack says it hopes that its industry partners (IKEA, The Climate Group and Philips) can help develop at least the winning idea into an actual product. Post your own ideas, comment on othersEarthHack allows anyone who registers to submit their own ideas for saving energy and reducing carbon emissions as well as comment on ideas that have been posted by other people.The goals are to:Reduce energy consumption, and manage or generate energy more efficiently.Make lighting more efficient.Reduce household waste and cut the amount of waste going to landfillls.Save water and minimize the use of chemicals in the homeEntries are roughly divided into three categories: design, materials and systems.Ideas are posted in the “Brainstorm” area, where icons indicate how many times each has been viewed, how many positive votes the idea has received, and the number of people who have posted comments on the idea.Here’s an example. A student named Wyatt Felt proposes a shower head that calculates how much water is being consumed and reports this to the user via LED lights. In other words, the person standing in the shower can look at the shower head and get an idea of how much water he or she has used up.“This creates a feedback loop that can coach the user toward a more sustainable shower habit,” Felt writes. “This could be especially valuable for kids learning to shower on their own.”A diagram posted with the idea shows how the device would work: water flow generates electricity which is read by an electronic sensor and displayed in real-time by an LED display around the rim of the shower head. Felt’s idea generated 714 views, 12 votes and 11 suggestions for improving it.By July 10, a total of 193 ideas had been submitted. Topics that ranged from fluorescent coatings for windows and solar food-drying kits to the use of a hydrophobic coating to reduce water consumption for cleanups.last_img read more