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Constitutional Studies visiting fellow discusses threats to religious freedom

first_imgDaniel Mark, visiting fellow with the Constitutional Studies Program, called for a defense of religious freedom in the face of global and national threats during a lecture Thursday.“We have before us the underlying question of whether people have the right to choose and live their faith free of interference by the government or whether the limits of religious freedom are determined solely by judgements of prudence such as whether encroachments on religious freedom will detract from a state’s international standing,” he said. “In other words, we have the question of whether people have a right to religious freedom in principle or only in practice when it suits the state.” Ann Curtis | The Observer Visiting fellow Daniel Mark presents a lecture Thursday in Jenkins-Nanovic Hall on modern threats to religious freedom around the globe and domestically from both the left and right sides of the aisle.Mark said he sees a “landscape that is deeply worrisome” when looking at religious freedom today and that he believes religious freedom is a right granted by God.On a global scale, Mark said totalitarianism, both religious and secular, threatens religious freedom. Mark cited Saudi Arabia and Iran as examples of this totalitarianism.“What critical to remember about those places is that the problem isn’t just religious freedom for minorities; it’s religious freedom for everyone,” he said. “ … [No one] is free to dissent or change or deny … The theocratic ways of these countries deprive the entire population, not just minorities, of religious freedom.”To have religious freedom, Mark said everyone must have the freedom to choose which religion to follow.“Religious totalitarianism ultimately aims to control the entire person, even down to one’s thoughts,” he said.Mark said the other global totalitarian threat, secular totalitarianism, “fears the true God” rather than “false gods.”In secular totalitarianism, Mark said, countries such as China suppress religion in the name of security.“In these countries, through elaborate systems of registration and approvals, the governments regulate and monitor all religious activities,” he said.In the U.S., Mark said, we must be grateful for our religious freedom and be vigilant in defending it.“We’re not inherently better or more deserving of religious freedom than anyone else in the world, and we should not take our good fortune for granted,” he said. “Rather, we must work hard to preserve the cultural and political and legal conditions that make religious freedom possible … We should neither exaggerate our problems here and forget how good we have it, nor should we exaggerate our blessings and neglect our defense of religious freedom.”Mark said the threats to religious freedom in the U.S. from the left are “more obvious and better known.”As an example of one recent trend, Mark noted that the fastest growing religious group in America is the “Nones,” or the people who do not identify with any religion on surveys.“My concern about this trend is that people who do not value religion are unlikely to value religious freedom,” he said.Mark said the underlying idea of many actions on the left “rejects anything that stands in the way of radical personal autonomy, not only to choose unrestrained what we do but even what we are.”“Having abandoned the proper grounds for human rights in order to make room for the ever-expanding list of demands, they’ve left the concept of rights so thin and so watered down that the very idea is in danger,” he said.In the U.S. on the right, Mark said there are two threats to classical liberalism, otherwise known as modern-day American conservatism. One of these is the alt-right, which Mark said represents a form of “identity politics that rejects the inherent dignity and equality of all human beings.” The other, Mark said, is a group of critics within the conservative movement that rejects classical liberalism and believes American democracy is “fatally flawed and bound to fail.”While he said the ideas of classical liberalism must be balanced with other values, Mark said individual rights are still important.“Is [classical liberalism critics’] goal to build a newer, better, likely smaller Christendom, or is their goal to create just enough space to build a Christian culture within a classical liberal world?” he said.Mark said he believes virtue and religion are necessary in today’s world. Citing a difference between liberty (“the freedom to pursue the good”) and license (“the freedom to do whatever you want”), Mark said the right to religious freedom must be grounded in the good of religion.“Once we know what is truly good for our nature, what is truly part of human flourishing, then we can know which rights are real and which aren’t,” he said. “ … Religious freedom is essential to the good of religion because in order to be genuine it must be freely chosen. The rights protect the goods.”Tags: classical liberalism, Constitutional Studies Program, religious freedom, totalitarianismlast_img read more

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Everton fans begin to lose faith in Roberto Martinez

first_img “It’s that naivety that is crippling them at the moment and is really dictating the results.” Ex-Wigan boss Martinez has been in charge at Everton since the summer of 2013. The Spaniard guided the Merseyside outfit to a fifth-placed Premier League finish in his first term, then 11th a year later in a season that also saw them reach the last 16 of the Europa League. “What he did in the first season was phenomenal, but the second season was a massive disappointment,” Magner said. “He didn’t have 100 per cent backing when he came in and I think he won a lot of fans over with the first season. “But in the second season, I think a lot of them were beginning to feel a little bit vindicated in their opinion of him when he came in.” Everton’s derby rivals Liverpool replaced manager Brendan Rodgers with Jurgen Klopp earlier this season, and Magner added: “If you look at other teams who have been in similar positions – Liverpool made a change when their manager wasn’t delivering, and they have someone in now with big European pedigree. “But unless results take a drastic turn for the worse, I can see Martinez still being there in May.” Martinez’s side ended up beaten 4-3 on aggregate by Manchester City after the second leg of their Capital One Cup semi-final on Wednesday, despite having taken a 3-1 lead in the tie early in the first half. In the Barclays Premier League, they are currently 12th with a record that shows only one win in their last 10 games and just three home victories in the entire campaign so far. The “vast majority” of Everton fans feel Roberto Martinez should no longer be the club’s manager, according to a prominent Toffees supporters group. Press Association Simon Magner, chair of the Everton Supporters Trust, told Press Association Sport on Thursday: “The feeling among fans from what I’ve seen over the last couple of weeks is that Martinez has been more and more running out of time with the fanbase. “Certainly, for a lot of fans, the semi-final was his last-chance saloon. “I have never known as many people as there are now admitting the time has passed for the manager and it is time for him to move on. “I think it is safe to say the vast majority of the fans are thinking time is up now and that it is time we tried something else.” While Martinez has complained of late – with Wednesday the latest occasion – about controversial refereeing decisions going against his team, they have conceded plenty of goals to restrict the impact of their frequently-impressive attacking play. And Magner said: “I don’t know what it is, but it doesn’t seem to be gelling. “We look like we could score against anyone, but I think what fans have been increasingly disappointed and annoyed about is that we are making the same mistakes at the back and don’t seem to be doing any sort of defensive drilling – because they are basic mistakes. “Obviously the bad decisions and controversy have played a part. But a lot of fans will also ask ‘how many times have we been in winning positions and lost?’ We don’t seem to be learning from mistakes. last_img read more

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Time Magazine’s Person of the Year 2019: Greta Thunberg

first_imgClimate activist Greta Thunberg is Time magazine’s Person of the Year for 2019.The 16-year-old Swedish climate activist has become the face of the climate change movement and she’s the youngest person to ever receive the distinction. Time magazine has given its Person of the Year award every year since 1927, to the person or persons who “most influenced the news and the world” in the past year.Thunberg beat out President Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the Hong Kong protesters, and “The Whistleblower” – the anonymous CIA officer who triggered the Trump impeachment inquiry.last_img read more