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Ateneo sweeps NU for 6th win in 7 games

first_imgJiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Although both teams scored 27 points apiece off spikes, the difference was in the service and blocking departments.Ateneo had an 11-3 advantage in blocks with De Leon’s five already eclipsing NU’s tally as a whole, and the Lady Eagles also outpointed the Lady Bulldogs, 14-3, in aces with Madayag scoring six of those.Madayag put up 13 points to lead Ateneo while Jules Samonte and Jhoanna Maraguinot adding 11 and 10 points, respectively.Santiago led the Lady Bulldogs with 16 points.ADVERTISEMENT Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims View comments Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAteneo made a huge jump in the upper half of the standings after taking down National University, 25-22, 25-16, 25-17, in the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament Saturday at Filoil Flying V Centre.The Lady Eagles, who’ve won six of their last seven games, moved from fourth to a triple tie at second place with idle Far Eastern University and the Lady Bulldogs, who all own similar 6-3 slates.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew LATEST STORIES Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism MOST READ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Bea De Leon was a one-woman wall for the Lady Eagles when she sent the ball back to NU three times in Ateneo’s last five points.De Leon first denied Jaja Santiago for the Lady Eagles’ 21-17 lead before making another block, this time against Audrey Paran, to make it, 24-17.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkAnd as fate would have it, it was De Leon, who once again blocked Paran for the Lady Eagles’ winner.“Blocking was really crucial for us because as we know their spiking is one of their biggest advantage of course with Jaja at the front line and even Risa [Sato] who’s really fast,” said De Leon. “If we get that stop it’s a huge step up for our defense.” UST stops 5-game skid at expense of UP, fans Final Four hopeslast_img read more

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Genes Evolving Downward

first_imgThose assuming the evolution of eukaryotic genomes has progressed upward in complexity may find the following abstract from PNAS1 startling:We use the pattern of intron conservation in 684 groups of orthologs from seven fully sequenced eukaryotic genomes to provide maximum likelihood estimates of the number of introns present in the same orthologs in various eukaryotic ancestors.  We find: (i) intron density in the plant-animal ancestor was high, perhaps two-thirds that of humans and three times that of Drosophila; and (ii) intron density in the ancestral bilateran was also high, equaling that of humans and four times that of Drosophila.  We further find that modern introns are generally very old, with two-thirds of modern bilateran introns dating to the ancestral bilateran and two-fifths of modern plant, animal, and fungus introns dating to the plant-animal ancestor.  Intron losses outnumber gains over a large range of eukaryotic lineages.  These results show that early eukaryotic gene structures were very complex, and that simplification, not embellishment, has dominated subsequent evolution. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)In their paper, Harvard biologists Scott Roy and Walter Gilbert used the maximum-likelihood phylogenetic method instead of maximum parsimony, and feel it provided a better ancestral tree.  In fact, they used the same data as other scientists who used parsimony, and got very different results.  They are emphatic about their conclusions:These results push back the origin of very introndense genome structures over a billion years to the plant-animal split.  Indeed, ancestors at the divergences between major eukaryotic kingdoms as well as the ancestral bilateran appear to have harbored nearly as many introns as the most intron-dense modern organisms.  This is a sharp repudiation of the common assumption that intron-riddled gene structures arose only recently.    In addition, our analysis shows that the majority of introns are themselves very old.  Two-thirds of bilateran introns were present in the bilateran ancestor; 40% of opisthokont introns were present in the opisthokont ancestor; and 40% of plant, animal, and fungal introns were present in the plant�animal ancestor.  This is quite different from what is commonly assumed and surprising in light of relatively fast rates of intron turnover observed in nematodes and flies.This bias toward intron loss instead of gain appears to be a general trend among eukaryotes, they conclude.  What does this mean?  The only way to rescue an evolution toward “improvement” with these results is to suggest that introns are bad, like parasites, and that over time, eukaryotes got better at ridding themselves of them.  They reject that and other notions, assuming instead that “It seems much more likely that different selection or mutation regimes for introns along different lineages are driving the observed instances of gene streamlining.”  Although intron function and evolution is still largely unknown, they leave only an admission of ignorance of what their results mean – only that geneticists had better re-examine their assumptions:These results contradict the assumption that genome complexity has increased through evolution.  Instead, species have repeatedly abandoned complex gene structures for simpler ones, questioning the purpose and value of intricate gene structures.  These results suggest a reconsideration of the genomics of eukaryotic emergence.1Scott W. Roy and Walter Gilbert, “Complex early genes,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0408355101, published online before print February 1, 2005.Introns and the complex molecular machines that process them (spliceosomes – see 09/12/2002 and 09/17/2004 entries) are still mysterious, but does anyone see a neat picture of evolution here?  Why would some introns be ultra-conserved (see 05/27/2004 entry), and others be removed?  Evolutionary theory is not helping explain introns or spliceosomes, and may be missing entirely the picture of what is going on.  Why not approach the data from the perspective of intelligent design and entropy?  The complexity was apparently present from the start.  Where did it come from?  The notions of ancestry in this picture are fictional.  The assumed trees are filled with gaps.  What seems apparent is devolution, not evolution.    Some have suggested that introns provide opportunities to expand the genetic code through alternative splicing, so that more information can be gleaned out of a compact code.  Others have pointed to robustness and repair as possible functions.  Let a new generation of geneticists approach this problem without fogged-up Darwinian glasses on.  They certainly cannot see things any worse than the Darwin Party has done so far.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Fire torches not the way to drive away elephants: SC

first_imgThe Supreme Court questioned the West Bengal government Monday over the use of fire torches to drive away elephants and directed the State to place before it the names and designations of the Forest officials who would be held responsible for any accident due to this.The apex court observed that the use of fire or fire torches “cannot be the only answer” for driving away elephants in West Bengal and directed that the tender floated by the State government for procuring burnt mobil oil for distribution among villagers not be processed in the meanwhile.Man-animal conflictWhen the counsel appearing for the State said using fire torches was the only way to avoid man-animal conflicts, a Bench of Justices Madan B. Lokur and Deepak Gupta said, “You will kill all the animals and then there will be no man-animal conflict.”“Wildlife is just being decimated. See the newspaper reports, so many elephants have died. Fire cannot be the only answer. You cannot go on burning everything. What is there to prevent somebody from throwing fire torches at the animals,” the Bench asked.It directed the State to file an affidavit within two weeks, giving the names and designations of the officials from each forest division who would be held accountable and responsible in case of an accident due to the use of fire or fire torches.High-beam lightsThe counsel appearing for the petitioner, who had raised the issue of the use of spikes and fireballs in some States to drive away elephants, told the apex court that instead of fire torches, the West Bengal government should provide high-beam lights to villagers.Meanwhile, Additional Solicitor-General A.N.S. Nadkarni, appearing for the Centre, said they had in-principle agreed to the suggestion of setting up a task force, which would formulate and implement measures to effectively deal with conflicts with elephants across the country. When the issue of use of fire in West Bengal was raked up, Mr. Nadkarni said, “Fireballs are not to be used.”Next hearingThe Bench posted the matter for further hearing on December 4.On October 22, the court had observed that human-animal conflicts, especially involving elephants, were a “problem” and the Centre should consider setting up a task force to ensure adherence to the guidelines in this regard.last_img read more