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Club presents film on war in Uganda

first_img “Invisible Children uses film, creativity and social action to end the use of child soldiers in Joseph Kony’s rebel war,” Kristen Metzger, senior, president and founder of the club, said. “We are young activists working to restore Northern Uganda to peace and prosperity.”  The organization believes in providing education to kids of northern Uganda who have lost hope in their own futures. Amelang said the three things we can do to help are to buy their merchandise, participate in the “Schools for Schools” program and commit to the Legacy scholarship fund which involves donating $35 a month to cover all school expenses for one child.  Ocaya’s mentor, Richard, helped him to find hope again and graduate high school. As Amelang explained in her lecture, this is a touching story that is sadly not the future for 93 percent of the youth in Uganda. Metzger said anyone in the tri-campus community are welcome. She also plans on opening events up to the entire South Bend community. Saint Mary’s Invisible Children club, which helps raise awareness of child soldiers in war-torn Uganda, hosted members on tour from the national Invisible Children organization in Carroll Auditorium Tuesday.  Through Invisible Children’s “Schools for Schools” program, students have raised $1.2 million towards the reconstruction of educational facilities destroyed by rebel militia, according to national member Terra Amelang.  Kids featured in the screening of “Go” had won the opportunity to go to Uganda and witness first hand what goes on in the lives of the people who live there. “We were taken into captivity for two weeks before we were rescued by the American government,” Ugandan citizen and former war captive, Jimmy Ocaya said. “I was tied with a rope to two other boys.” The event featured a screening of an update on the organization’s progress called “Go.” presented by two men directly involved with Invisible Children in Uganda.  “The people of Uganda are asking for a future beyond the conflict, and their pleas have inspired this organization,” Metzger said. “Our main goal is enable children to take responsibility for their destiny and the fate of their country.” “It takes sacrifice to give what nobody can steal,” native Ugandan and Invisible Children mentor Richard Mark Ochaka said.last_img read more

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College hosts annual Career and Internship Fair

first_imgThe annual Saint Mary’s Career and Internship Fair was held Wednesday at the Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex on Wednesday from 4:30-7 p.m.Last year the fair was held in the Student Center but Stacie Jeffirs, the Saint Mary’s Career Crossings director, said in an email that she was excited to move into a bigger venue.“We are excited because we are hosting this year’s career and internship in the newly-renovated Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex,” Jeffirs said. “This venue allows for more space to host more organizations and for all of our organizations to be in the same location versus spread out through the Student Center. We have some new organizations that are participating this year, and there will be opportunities for students from all majors. We are also looking forward to having some of our Saint Mary’s alumnae back on campus recruiting with their organizations including the Orr Fellows, Emarsys and others.”The Saint Mary’s career fair is small but growing annually with nearly 50 organizations this year offering full-time jobs, part-time jobs, internships, community service and graduate programs for a variety of majors.Sarah Enck, assistant director of the Saint Mary’s Career Crossings Office, said she thinks it is important for everyone to attend the career fair.“I think the importance of students attending the Career and Internship Fair depends on their goal,” Enck said.“For seniors, it may be to find a job or other opportunity after graduation. Sophomores and juniors may be looking for summer internships. We encourage freshman students to attend if they are interested, to get a head start on how to navigate career fairs. Whatever the goal is, I think it is important for students to learn about the various companies and organizations that they may have not thought of before and learn about different opportunities that could be available to them. I also think it’s important for students to practice their networking and professional interpersonal skills early so they can feel prepared for interviews and confident moving into the workplace.”To prepare for any of these goals, the College also provides a free workshop before the career fair. The workshop helps students research companies attending the fair, develop introduction strategies, create resumes and, ultimately, get jobs. Enck said that she often sees students have success with obtaining jobs.“The Career and Internship Fair is a great avenue for students to obtain internships and jobs,” Enck said. “The fair provides an opportunity for students to learn more about companies and network employers from various industries. These interactions will often lead to interviews, which can produce positions within the companies.”Genesis Vasquez, a junior at Saint Mary’s, attended the Career and Internship Fair to broaden her opportunities.“[The career fair is important because] it helps give students the perspective to go and look at employers, [and] if they are seniors, potentially get a job,” she said. “If you’re not a senior, it can help you to find opportunities for internships.”Vasquez said she attended the career fair to look for internships and after college opportunities.“I don’t want to go straight to grad school after Saint Mary’s, so, I’m looking at options like volunteer work and service opportunities,” she said.Tags: angela athletic and wellness complex, Career and Internship Fairlast_img read more

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Barbados hit by virtual disaster

first_img Share Share Local and regional agencies respond to worst-case scenario at Exercise Tradewinds 2012 in Barbados.BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Wednesday June 27, 2012 – Barbados was just hit by a tsunami in the midst of dealing with a terrorist hostage situation, a collapsed stadium and a bombing that damaged an oil tanker causing an oil spill into Carlisle Bay, all while preparing for the impending threat of a hurricane.Fortunately, none of this happened, but it was the scenario that the agencies and nations involved in the Command Post Exercise (CPX) of Exercise Tradewinds 2012 had to resolve in the recently concluded five-day training event.Tradewinds 2012 was an interagency, multinational exercise designed to enhance the collective abilities of Caribbean defense forces and disaster management agencies to counter transnational organized crime, provide disaster relief and humanitarian aid.Now in its 28th year, Tradewinds was hosted by Barbados and involved the participation of 14 other nations from the region: Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Belize, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago.  In addition, the United States and Canada facilitated and conducted the training involved in the exercise.Tradewinds consisted of practical ground forces training, practical maritime training and the virtual CPX.The CPX was arguably the most important part of the event this year because it augmented the partnerships between the participating partner nations.The goal of this year’s training was to maximize and optimize the interoperability of the Regional Security System (RSS) coming into Barbados as if an event happened here, said Major Carlos Davila, exercise plans officer with Marine Forces South and Chief Controller of the CPX.The exercise has been successful in serving to shed some light on areas that need to be re-worked in order to make the effort more efficient in the future, said Major Davila.“It gives us a chance to see where we can coordinate our response better to disaster relief or criminal activity,” said Carl Williams, Royal Barbados Police Force community officer and a training conductor in the CPX.The importance of the exercise can only be measured in a time of crisis when it is critical to have maximum cooperation between the nations of the region and the respective agencies that would respond in order to augment the safety and security of the affected area.Barbadians were placed in the decision-making roles in order for them to gain the maximum benefit of the exercise here in their home nation.“We placed partner nations in staff positions to support Barbados in command positions because they would normally head the operation here anyway,” said Major Davila.One particular focus of the CPX was how the region responds to disaster relief and humanitarian aid. This was especially important to stress in a geographical location frequently threatened by hurricanes.“The exercise is well on its way to achieving the stated objectives,” said Robert Harewood, program officer at the Department of Emergency Management and a training conductor in the CPX.The objectives were fully encompassing and focused on aspects that aren’t normally practiced.“We are testing strategic planning in order to put procedures in place to fix the problems,” said Harewood. “We have been working on scenarios for about six months.”While the training event lacked the stress of real-world tragedy, the requirement for a quick response to a disaster scenario created its own pressure.“We’re pushing the envelope to the actual breaking point in order to measure our response and identify what opportunities we have for improvement,” said Harewood.It took the cooperation and diligence of many agencies just to plan something of this magnitude.“A whole host of agencies sit around a table and basically discuss the challenges and come up with solutions to those challenges,” said Harewood.Tradewinds 2012 provided the opportunity for interagency and international training between partner nations. This developed and maintained participating regional civil and maritime services’ capabilities to respond to a variety of missions while exercising vital information sharing and coordinating lines of communication between exercise participants.Caribbean 360 News Share 10 Views   no discussionscenter_img Tweet NewsRegional Barbados hit by virtual disaster by: – June 27, 2012 Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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ECST State Team

first_img2019 INDIANA SWIMMING AGE GROUP SHORT COURSE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sponsored by SPEEDO and HENDRICKS REGIONAL HEALTHMarch 8-10, 2019IU Natatorium (IUPUI Campus) 901 West New York Street Indianapolis, IN 46202Sanctioned by USA and Indiana Swimming #IN19002East Central Swim Team Aqua TrojansThe swimmers that made Age Group State are:Female 10&URiley Reany: 200 free 2:28.73, 50 free 30.66, 50 back 35.67, 100 back 1:17.79, and 100 free 1:06.56Male 11-12 age group Henry Strotman: 100 breast 1:18.77, 50 free, 26.85, and 50 breast 35.60Male 13-14 age group Nick Weber: 50 free 21.87, 200 back 2:10.04, 100 free 48.37, and 100 back 1:04.79LFemale 15 & OverKyra Hall  100 back 57.65, 200 back 2:12.93 100 fly 58.88Male 15 & OverJackson Ketcham: 200 Free 1:44.11, 500 free 4:46.76 200 fly 1:56.94Jacob Weber 100 back 53.68 100 fly 52.09, 200 IM 1:59.16 Boy 13-14 Medley Relay: Nick Weber, Frank Strotman, Luke Jackson, Kaden Cummins 1:53.40Good Luck at state ECST!!last_img read more

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Madison School Corporation to depart from SCC

first_imgVersailles, IN—In an open letter to the Madison Consolidated School Community, Southeastern Career Center director, Derek Marshall, announced the disengagement of Madison Consolidated Schools from SCC after the 2109-2020 school year.  Marshall further clarifies misconceived information pertaining to the cost per student per school year and each school systems cost to maintain their partnerships.  According to Marshall’s letter, in the 2018-2019 school year, SCC students earned over 3000 college credits as well as over 700 industry certifications. SCC is partnered with over 12 school corporations in 6 counties.The Southeastern Career Center is the first Career and Technical Education Center that was built in the state of Indiana. In 1964, a group of very forward thinking educators and business leaders saw a need for a bridge between Industry and Education and saw that it needed to start at the high school level.last_img read more

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Reward Increased to Find Orphaned Baby Andrew

first_imgInvestigators have increased the reward for the safe return of a missing baby from South Florida to $8,000.Andrew Caballeiro has been missing since Jan. 28 when he entire family was shot and killed.Baby Andrew vanished after a triple murder at a home in Miami-Dade last month.Police believe the father of the 12-day-old boy, Ernesto Caballeiro, kidnapped the infant and killed his mother, grandmother and great grandmother.Police found Mr. Caballeiro dead from a self-inflicted gunshot one day after the kidnapping.#UPDATE: Thanks to assistance from the @FLSheriffs Criminal Apprehension Assistance Program and @CrimeStopper305, the reward on this case has increased to up to $8,000. Anyone with information on his whereabouts is requested to call 9-1-1 or (305) 471-8477 IMMEDIATELY. pic.twitter.com/Fj3btAM2Qx— Miami-Dade Police (@MiamiDadePD) February 19, 2020last_img read more