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Dragados’ Aberdeen Update: Half of Caissons Placed in South Harbor

first_imgImage source: DragadosThe Aberdeen Harbor Expansion Project has reached another important landmark, with the placement of the 11th caisson at Nigg Bay, out of a total of 22. This 7,000-tonnes caisson, which bears the name Catrina, is part of Aberdeen South Harbor’s Dunnottar Quay.“It has been towed on site on a two-day journey from the Cromarty Firth. Once this floating structure was correctly positioned, its empty chambers were filled with water in order to sink it into its permanent position,” Dragados SA UK & Ireland, the principal contractor for the Aberdeen Harbor Expansion Project, said in its latest announcement.The final caissons will soon be transported from La Coruna in Spain to Scotland, where they will be floated into position as needed.Construction on Aberdeen Harbor Board’s £350 million South Harbor is now progressing according to schedule. This follows six years of unprecedented public engagement by the Board and Executive Team across the widest range of stakeholders.The pre-construction feasibility study also included a large-scale Environmental Impact Assessment, an integrated investigation into funding streams, and the creation of a Development Framework, which considered the opportunities presented by the potential investment in the new harbor for the wider Nigg, East Tullos and Altens area.Three high level planning applications were also secured: a Harbor Revision Order from Transport Scotland, Marine Licenses from Marine Scotland and for Planning Permission in Principle from Aberdeen City Council.Image source: Dragadoslast_img read more

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Lim’s strong play propels USC to finals

first_imgUSC junior Steve Lim watched from the fairway as his second shot on the par-4 10th hole drifted right, eventually landing in the greenside bunker.Clutch · Junior Steve Lim’s tie for second-place at the San Diego Regional led USC to its fifth consecutive NCAA final appearance. – Photo courtesy of USC Sports Information To make matters worse, his playing partners from Ohio State and UCLA had just stuck their approach shots in the center of the green.Lim, however, promptly sunk his shot from the sand, birdying the hole and besting his competitors, who had to settle for two-putt pars.“It didn’t go the way I wanted, but I ended up in the bunker, holed out, and it’s the best thing I could do,” Lim said.The junior’s adventurous 10th hole provided a microcosm of what was an up-and-down, but ultimately, successful week for the No. 15  USC men’s golf team. Lim’s 7-under par week (68-71-70) led the Trojans at the survive-and-advance NCAA West Regional at the Farms Golf Club in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.“It was mission accomplished,” USC coach Chris Zambri said. “[Friday and Saturday] were a little shaky but overall we’re happy to dofwhat we needed to do which is get out of here with a spot in nationals.”USC’s second place finish at 7-under-par guaranteed it a spot in the season’s final tournament, which will be played May 31 through June 5 in Stillwater, Okla. No. 4 UCLA (13-under-par), No. 25 San Diego (even par), No. 28  Ohio State (1-over) and No. 11 Texas (9-over) also qualified for the NCAA championship from the West Regional.The Trojans got off to a blazing start Thursday, grabbing a nine-stroke lead after the first round at 10-under par.Freshman Jeffery Kang made eight birdies on his way to an opening round 66, which was good for a two-shot lead. Kang, like the Trojans, cooled off considerably over the next two days though, shooting 76-76 and finishing in a tie for 17th.“I had a really good start,” Kang said. “Unfortunately, I didn’t play well the rest of the week.”Sophomore Martin Trainer continued his solid play coming off of his victory at the Pac-10 championships earlier this month. Trainer’s scores of 73-71-69 earned him a seventh place finish at 3-under-par for the tournament.“I left a lot of shots out there,” Trainer said. “The course wasn’t too tough so I feel like I could have done better, but I’m just happy that we got through as a team.”Fellow sophomore T.J. Vogel echoed Trainer’s excitement for the team but expressed frustration with his individual results. Vogel, a freshman All-American last season, shot 71-77-74 and finished in a tie for 39th.“It’s been a struggle,” Vogel said of his sophomore season. “It’s extremely frustrating seeing where I was last year and seeing where I am now. My short game isn’t up to par, my ball striking, just everything is at a level lower than it was at last year, but I’m working hard to get it back to where it was.”Sophomore Sam Smith shot 78-72-79 and placed 60th, a disappointing finish after his eighth place result at the Pac-10 championship.Zambri said he had come into the week afraid that the Farms Golf Club course didn’t suit his team and that the abundant hazards could cause the Trojans problems.“Just coming off our previous event, Pac-10’s, we didn’t hit a lot of fairways so I was a little bit fearful of this type of layout, which is the kind if you hit it sideways, you’re goning to make double and triple [bogeys],” Zambri said. “I’m really happy that we got through.”The Trojans, however, made it clear their performance at the regional stage was only a means to a greater end.“It’s all about winning national championships,” Trainer said about the team’s goal. “That’s what USC is about and that’s what we want to do as a team.”last_img read more

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Pastor Kortu Brown Responds to His Critics on Dual Citizenship

first_imgI read with interest the Daily Observer’s Editorial of Thursday, March 05, 2015, entitled: “Dual Citizenship: Look Up and Forward, Pastor Brown – not Down and Backward” and Letters to the editor captioned: “Dual Citizenship: Liberians Everywhere Take Pastor Kortu Brown to Task” in the same publication, page 5, largely accusing me of being “stupid,” “idiot,” “playing the ethnic card,” etc. because I dared to express my VIEWS on the current debate on dual citizenship in Liberia.I also appreciated the “lecture” provided by the editorial board on the history of Israel and I think it is application to the quest for dual citizenship by some Liberians.But here is what I wrote and/ or have been saying for several days now:1. That the issue of dual citizenship for Liberia is not timely.2. That there are more serious national concerns i.e. children going to school, ending Ebola and rebuilding health system, poverty, fixing our roads, state-wide initiatives to increase incomes at the individual, household, community and national levels, etc. to address at the moment than focusing on an issue that can be addressed later3. That we should be careful how we craft this dual citizenship initiative to avoid a repetition of the concept of the “Country-Congo” divide that plunged the country into a bloody coup and a civil war. Ours, as a nation, has been an experience in self-affliction that resulted in a class system that brought us untold pains to repel. No matter which side of the divide you were then, we know that “power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely”. So we must check this “power” that we want to give out because old habits die hard!4. That an alternative to “dual citizenship” could be the Indian model of “Overseas Citizens of India” (OCI) which enables Indians in the Diaspora to freely return to their land of nativity and contribute to the socio-economic development of their country.5. That Liberia could enact the “Overseas Citizens of Liberia” (OCL) Act to accommodate the aspirations of natural-born Liberians who have lost their citizenship due to them “renouncing and abjuring” their citizenship of nativity in a foreign land6. That most Liberians of influence whether [settler descendant or indigenous],” are not deeply committed to this country and will place a foreign country’s interest over and above their land of nativity. As a matter of fact, it was only until recently that most Liberians overseas began to think seriously about dual citizenship. Many didn’t think Liberia was “worthy” of their new found status as either American or European citizens or otherwise. That’s our history, that’s our experience. Should we dodge it or sacrifice it on the altar of a dual citizenship campaign?Now to some of the allegations made against me:1. Playing the ethnic card? : I don’t promote ethnicity and will never do. I am “[part indigenous, I am “part settler”]. Part of my family background is Millsburg. I just spoke my mind and I think am entitled to it. I’m forewarning based on our recent past. A good initiative to return [men and women freed from slavery] to Liberia ended into a “class struggle” between people who returned home and those they met on the ground. That struggle was sustained through mistrust, division, wars, etc. for well over a century and a half based on preconceptions, misconception, am-better-than-you attitude, etc. Therefore no matter how well-intentioned we may be, we must take care not to repeat that unfortunate experience as we debate the dual citizenship proposal. What’s playing-the-ethnic-card about saying that? If in a country where the illiteracy rate is as high as 70% and you try to make two categories of citizenship, shouldn’t you be concerned about the possibility of it contributing and/or resuscitating old social divides like the [settler-indigenous one]?2. Sierra Leone: I didn’t say Sierra Leone is not dual citizenship. It’s www.immihelp.com that reported that. I quoted them with a question mark (?). Mr. Editor, please check my article and see if I did not put a question mark to Sierra Leone. I even mentioned [that] Liberia is not on the list. Daily Observer claims I got most of my facts wrong. I think it’s the paper not reading my facts properly. I’ve a copy of the 2006 Dual Citizenship Act of Sierra Leone3. Israel: This is a country that has seen dispersion, persecution and death for about two thousand years at the hands of her enemies. Jews scattered all around the world – and waited for the Bible prophecy to be fulfilled. That came May 1948. Thank God! For Israeli, they are first and foremost, Jewish. Their situation and devotion to country and people is slightly different from Liberia. Most Liberians overseas say it is the civil war that forced them away from their country and made them “renounce and abjure” their citizenship of nativity. Well, if that is the case, then they don’t need dual citizenship status for them to come back home. A nominee for Minister of Education refused Liberian Senate inquiry in 2014 to relinquish US Citizenship to serve as Minister of Education. Mayor Boris Johnson of London has announced his intentions to renounce US Citizenship and maintain his British citizenship 4. Overseas Citizens of Liberia: To advance the discussions, I have proposed that we adopt the Indian model of dual citizenship, “Overseas Citizens of India” (OCI), where one person doesn’t carry two passports but a “permit” to enter and leave the country and do business as you desire within the confines of the law. This is a one step forward over and above the current rejection without an alternative. But this category of citizens will be eligible for elected office, etc.5. Civil discourse: I plead with you and your readers that we kindly make the debate courteous, polite, and responsible even if we don’t share the same sides of the discussions. Calling names and being disrespectful because someone doesn’t share your view, is disingenuous to be debate because it’s an unfair effort to silence others by attacking their persons, etc. If this discourse is not frank, honest and open then I doubt if we are able to sustain a society of “dual and single citizens” because this will be something we will debate for the rest of our lives.6. Focus: Most supporters of dual citizenship mostly focus on Liberians living in the USA and / or Europe. But there are Liberians all over including West Africa and [other] parts of the world. Secondly, many countries with dual citizenship may not share the experience that Liberia had with de facto dual citizenship for more than one hundred and fifty years.7. My Contribution to Liberia: Well, maybe the person accusing me of doing nothing has NOT been in Liberia for more than quarter of a century. My contributions from emergency relief, rehabilitation, education, agriculture, to peace making and reconciliation, Ebola, etc., are all documented. Check the internet. Goggle Kortu K. Brown and you will read some of that. Secondly, I have not run away from Liberia all through the years of conflict even when I could. My wife and children are all here. I love Liberia and don’t want it hurt again and left bleeding by people who are here today and gone tomorrow when difficulties strike. That’s why I am yelling and admonishing caution on dual citizenship.I hope I have brought some clarity to some of the issues I raised in my previous article. I ask the Daily Observer, a paper I’ve read since 1981, to publish in full my previous article and let the public read the facts I got wrong there. May God bless and guide our country and people.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more