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Club presents film on war in Uganda

first_img “Invisible Children uses film, creativity and social action to end the use of child soldiers in Joseph Kony’s rebel war,” Kristen Metzger, senior, president and founder of the club, said. “We are young activists working to restore Northern Uganda to peace and prosperity.”  The organization believes in providing education to kids of northern Uganda who have lost hope in their own futures. Amelang said the three things we can do to help are to buy their merchandise, participate in the “Schools for Schools” program and commit to the Legacy scholarship fund which involves donating $35 a month to cover all school expenses for one child.  Ocaya’s mentor, Richard, helped him to find hope again and graduate high school. As Amelang explained in her lecture, this is a touching story that is sadly not the future for 93 percent of the youth in Uganda. Metzger said anyone in the tri-campus community are welcome. She also plans on opening events up to the entire South Bend community. Saint Mary’s Invisible Children club, which helps raise awareness of child soldiers in war-torn Uganda, hosted members on tour from the national Invisible Children organization in Carroll Auditorium Tuesday.  Through Invisible Children’s “Schools for Schools” program, students have raised $1.2 million towards the reconstruction of educational facilities destroyed by rebel militia, according to national member Terra Amelang.  Kids featured in the screening of “Go” had won the opportunity to go to Uganda and witness first hand what goes on in the lives of the people who live there. “We were taken into captivity for two weeks before we were rescued by the American government,” Ugandan citizen and former war captive, Jimmy Ocaya said. “I was tied with a rope to two other boys.” The event featured a screening of an update on the organization’s progress called “Go.” presented by two men directly involved with Invisible Children in Uganda.  “The people of Uganda are asking for a future beyond the conflict, and their pleas have inspired this organization,” Metzger said. “Our main goal is enable children to take responsibility for their destiny and the fate of their country.” “It takes sacrifice to give what nobody can steal,” native Ugandan and Invisible Children mentor Richard Mark Ochaka said.last_img read more

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Indonesia suspects two more H5N1 cases

first_imgMar 29, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesia today reported two new suspected human cases of H5N1 avian influenza, both fatal, as the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed a case in China that was reported yesterday.Indonesian officials said initial tests indicated H5N1 infection in a 14-year-old boy who died in West Sumatra province on Mar 24 and a 28-year-old woman from central Jakarta who died yesterday, according to Xinhua, China’s state news agency.Haris Subiantoro of Indonesia’s health ministry told Xinhua that chickens in the boy’s neighborhood died suspiciously 2 weeks before the boy got sick. The Associated Press listed his age as 15. Subiantoro said it was not clear if the woman had any contact with infected birds.Officials are waiting for the results of second tests to confirm the cases, Subiantoro told Xinhua.By the WHO count, Indonesia has had 81 H5N1 cases with 63 deaths. But since Jan 29, Indonesia has reported at least nine cases (besides those reported today) that have not yet been recognized by the WHO; seven of those were fatal. The nine cases include three reported Mar 27 in which further test results were awaited.Indonesia agreed 2 days ago to resume sharing its H5N1 virus samples with the WHO, under certain conditions designed to give the country control over which vaccine manufacturers get access to seed viruses made from the samples.Also today, the WHO confirmed that a 16-year-old Chinese boy from Anhui province died of H5N1 illness. The WHO report said he developed fever and pneumonia-like symptoms Mar 17, was hospitalized 3 days later, and died Mar 27. He becomes China’s 24th H5N1 case-patient and its 15th fatality from the disease.Investigators have found no indication he had contact with sick birds before he became ill, but health officials are still tying to identify the source of his infection, the WHO report said. His close contacts are being monitored and remain well.With confirmation of the Chinese case, the WHO’s global H5N1 count reached 285 cases with 170 deaths.See also:Mar 29 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2007_03_29/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Syracuse splits weekend series with Lindenwood

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 8, 2013 at 2:44 pm Syracuse looked shell-shocked on the ice after its stunning 2-1 loss to Lindenwood. Less than 24 hours later following the disappointing outing, though, Syracuse responded with a convincing 4-1 win over Lindenwood to end the first half of its season.Senior defender Caitlin Roach described Friday’s defeat in the simplest way possible.“They outworked us and got their shots on net,” Roach said.SU (8-8-2) displayed a lack of energy from the start against Lindenwood (2-14-2) with Chancellor-designate Kent Syverud and Director of Athletics Daryl Gross among the 202 people in attendance at Tennity Ice Pavilion on Friday night. The Lions struck first when forward Kendra Broad scored halfway through the second period to give her squad a 1-0 edge.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNearly two periods into the game, Syracuse was unable to capitalize on any opportunities against sophomore goalie Nicole Hensley. That changed when Roach delivered on a power-play goal by going coast to coast and tying the game with 1:03 remaining in the period.But Lindenwood was not fazed, as smiles and high-fives surfaced on the ice as the second period came to a close. The Lady Lions were in an ideal position to earn their second victory of the season.“There was no feeling of momentum on our side,” Roach said. “Lindenwood still had the momentum on their side of the puck and we didn’t take our chances of capitalizing coming into the third period.”Lindenwood capitalized on the biggest opportunity of the game within the closing seconds of the final period. After Syracuse forward Jessica Sibley committed a penalty with 34 seconds remaining, the Lions were given a five-on-four opportunity in the final seconds of regulation.Twenty-eight seconds into the power-play, Lindenwood’s Katie Erickson launched from the point with ease as she watched the puck sail past Jenesica Drinkwater for the game-winning goal.Drinkwater, who was dealt her first loss of the season, lost the puck in her tracks. “I kind of lost sight of it quickly and it cost me,” she said. “Those couple seconds were really key into going into overtime.”She did not provide any excuses for the team’s effort overall against Lindenwood, though.“They didn’t stop working all game,” she said of the visitors. “They were putting everything they could on net so I’m going to give them kudos.”Despite entering the game with one victory on the season, Lindenwood proved to Syracuse that its record is not an indication of how much effort they give on the ice. Roach acknowledged that her team underestimated the Lady Lions.“I feel that mentally we didn’t prepare ourselves for how hard of a working team they are,” she said.On Saturday, though, Syracuse responded with a dominant win. Senior Margot Scharfe started the offensive production for the Orange with a goal 11 minutes into the first period with her team shorthanded. Sibley added a power-play goal less than five minutes into the second period, giving Syracuse a two-goal lead that was never relinquished.Forward Nicole Ferrara added a goal that extended the lead to 3-1 in the third period, followed by an empty-net goal by forward Melissa Piacentini in the final seconds of the game.Syracuse head coach Paul Flanagan was pleased with his team’s effort this time around.“Our mental preparation was a lot better,” Flanagan said. “They outworked us at times (on Friday) and we just didn’t execute. Today, I thought we outworked them. We had to set the tone with our work ethic.”Flanagan believes that the first half of the season had some missed opportunities, but there is plenty of time to make the necessary improvements for a playoff push.“It’s comforting that we are back to .500”, he said. “I think we’ve learned a lot about ourselves as a team. They understand what we have to do to be successful. “Regardless of our record, I know we are capable of beating anybody.” Commentslast_img read more