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Cathal Ó Searcaigh launches four new books in Gortahork – Pic Special

first_imgCathal Ó Searcaigh’s book launch took place on Saturday night along with guests in his home town of Gortahork.The author showcased four new books, inclduing Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House,  and The View from the Glen.Several of Ó Searcaigh’s books have been nominated for An Post’s ‘Book of the Year’ award recently and has been book of the month for various Irish language groups. These essays document the tiny details and intimate spaces of his beloved corner of Donegal and moves into the wider world of dancing with Irish music lovers in Milwaukie and navigating the bustling streets of New Delhi.On the night, recitals took place by Ó Searcaigh and poet and translator Paddy Bushe, while singing was provided by Diane Ní Chanainn and Brian (Danny Minnie) Ó Domhnaill.Refreshments were also served at the free event.Clive Wasson attended the event and captured some of the best moments of the night below. at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonCathal Ó Searcaigh speaking at his book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonThe packed hall at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonSome of the large crowd at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonCathal Ó Searcaigh speaking at his book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonCathal Ó Searcaigh and Lillis O’Laoire at his book launch inGortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonUna Campbell with Cathal Ó Searcaigh at his book launch in Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonBrían O’Domhnaill, Brian Lacey and Manus Kelly at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonRoise, Murray and Hamish Learmount at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonMary Cassidy and Eithe Ní Gallchobhair at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonRomain Becker, Máirín De Buitlatéir and Edna Groves the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonSibylle Stegerhoey and Stephen Stegerhoey at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonFr. Sean Gallagher with Cathal Ó Searcaigh at his book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonElaine Devine and Anne McClaffferty at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonJacob Agee, Paddy Bushe, Cathal Ó Searcaigh, Chris Agee and Seosamh Mac Murí at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonJacob Agee, Paddy Bushe, Cathal Ó Searcaigh, Chris Agee and Seosamh Mac Murí at the Cathal Ó Searcaigh book launch in his home town of Gortahork four books were launched Crann na Teanga – The Language Tree, Teach an Gheafta – Gate House, Teanga na gCorr – The Language of the Cranes and The View from the Glen. Photo Clive WassonCathal Ó Searcaigh launches four new books in Gortahork – Pic Special was last modified: March 7th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Cathal O Searcaighgortahorklast_img read more

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Genes Evolving Downward

first_imgThose assuming the evolution of eukaryotic genomes has progressed upward in complexity may find the following abstract from PNAS1 startling:We use the pattern of intron conservation in 684 groups of orthologs from seven fully sequenced eukaryotic genomes to provide maximum likelihood estimates of the number of introns present in the same orthologs in various eukaryotic ancestors.  We find: (i) intron density in the plant-animal ancestor was high, perhaps two-thirds that of humans and three times that of Drosophila; and (ii) intron density in the ancestral bilateran was also high, equaling that of humans and four times that of Drosophila.  We further find that modern introns are generally very old, with two-thirds of modern bilateran introns dating to the ancestral bilateran and two-fifths of modern plant, animal, and fungus introns dating to the plant-animal ancestor.  Intron losses outnumber gains over a large range of eukaryotic lineages.  These results show that early eukaryotic gene structures were very complex, and that simplification, not embellishment, has dominated subsequent evolution. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)In their paper, Harvard biologists Scott Roy and Walter Gilbert used the maximum-likelihood phylogenetic method instead of maximum parsimony, and feel it provided a better ancestral tree.  In fact, they used the same data as other scientists who used parsimony, and got very different results.  They are emphatic about their conclusions:These results push back the origin of very introndense genome structures over a billion years to the plant-animal split.  Indeed, ancestors at the divergences between major eukaryotic kingdoms as well as the ancestral bilateran appear to have harbored nearly as many introns as the most intron-dense modern organisms.  This is a sharp repudiation of the common assumption that intron-riddled gene structures arose only recently.    In addition, our analysis shows that the majority of introns are themselves very old.  Two-thirds of bilateran introns were present in the bilateran ancestor; 40% of opisthokont introns were present in the opisthokont ancestor; and 40% of plant, animal, and fungal introns were present in the plant�animal ancestor.  This is quite different from what is commonly assumed and surprising in light of relatively fast rates of intron turnover observed in nematodes and flies.This bias toward intron loss instead of gain appears to be a general trend among eukaryotes, they conclude.  What does this mean?  The only way to rescue an evolution toward “improvement” with these results is to suggest that introns are bad, like parasites, and that over time, eukaryotes got better at ridding themselves of them.  They reject that and other notions, assuming instead that “It seems much more likely that different selection or mutation regimes for introns along different lineages are driving the observed instances of gene streamlining.”  Although intron function and evolution is still largely unknown, they leave only an admission of ignorance of what their results mean – only that geneticists had better re-examine their assumptions:These results contradict the assumption that genome complexity has increased through evolution.  Instead, species have repeatedly abandoned complex gene structures for simpler ones, questioning the purpose and value of intricate gene structures.  These results suggest a reconsideration of the genomics of eukaryotic emergence.1Scott W. Roy and Walter Gilbert, “Complex early genes,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0408355101, published online before print February 1, 2005.Introns and the complex molecular machines that process them (spliceosomes – see 09/12/2002 and 09/17/2004 entries) are still mysterious, but does anyone see a neat picture of evolution here?  Why would some introns be ultra-conserved (see 05/27/2004 entry), and others be removed?  Evolutionary theory is not helping explain introns or spliceosomes, and may be missing entirely the picture of what is going on.  Why not approach the data from the perspective of intelligent design and entropy?  The complexity was apparently present from the start.  Where did it come from?  The notions of ancestry in this picture are fictional.  The assumed trees are filled with gaps.  What seems apparent is devolution, not evolution.    Some have suggested that introns provide opportunities to expand the genetic code through alternative splicing, so that more information can be gleaned out of a compact code.  Others have pointed to robustness and repair as possible functions.  Let a new generation of geneticists approach this problem without fogged-up Darwinian glasses on.  They certainly cannot see things any worse than the Darwin Party has done so far.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Henry David Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin Led to Loss of Belief in God

first_imgFor a thoroughly-documented yet disturbing tableau of the pernicious effects of Darwinian thinking on all aspects of society, we recommend one of Dr Bergman’s most recent books, How Darwinism Corrodes Morality (2017).(Visited 848 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The effects of Darwinism go far beyond biology. On the bicentenary of Henry David Thoreau, a historian traces his fall from grace into Darwinian materialism.by Dr Jerry BergmanNovels and literature can be critically important avenues for changing Western culture. Most surveys find that more people read fiction and stories in general, such as historical fiction and romance, than nonfiction of all types. Fiction has a huge impact on our beliefs for this and other reasons.What is nature? A product of design, exalting life, or chance, demeaning it? Photo by David CoppedgeIn Concord, Massachusetts this year, on July 11, a bicentennial celebration will be held for Henry David Thoreau, a giant American literary figure known for advocating the romantic ideal of a simple life surrounded by the beauty of nature. In an article in Nature, Randall Fuller traces Thoreau’s debt to Darwin after Walden, watching him fall from the grace of nature’s sublime design to a material world of chance.Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was one of the most important American writers. He is best known today for his book Walden, that stressed the benefits of simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for disobeying unjust actions of government. He was a prolific author whose works have been a staple of American education from high school to college for decades. Along with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bronson Alcott (the father of Louisa May Alcott), Thoreau and his circle of friends were writers with wide influence. But another writer would come to heavily influence them all: Charles Darwin.[i]For example, up to this time Thoreau accepted transcendentalism, the view that asserts the primacy of the spiritual and transcendental over the material. But then, his reading of Darwin’s Origin began to severely challenge this worldview for which he was best known, Fuller says.[ii] Many other leading early American writers and clergy, after they understood “Darwin’s theory of natural selection … discover[ed] that it also posed enormous threats to their other beliefs, including their faith in God and their trust that America was a country divinely chosen for the regeneration of the world.”[iii] Thoreau had to face these issues head on just five years after he had published Walden in 1854. (He died of tuberculosis in 1862 at age 45, three years after Darwin’s Origin had arrived in America.)This process can be wrenching; it leaves people trapped between two ways of thinking and believing, stranded between two existences.Due to the influence of Darwin, Thoreau moved “close to Darwin’s position. He assumed the universe was governed by laws, but he also believed that the products of those laws occurred in a more or less random way. He hovered between design and chance, between idealism and materialism.”[iv] In the end, Thoreau rejected the transcendentalism for which he had been famous, and placed the mystery and wonder of life within the worldview of materialism. Nonetheless, Thoreau realized that empirical knowledge is finite, and afterwe have exhausted its limits, we are still left with speculation, supposition, and hypotheses. And those are invariably influenced by belief in some ordering principle. For many people, that principle involves a divinity inherited from four thousand years of tradition.[v]He was speaking, of course, of the influence of the Bible as the “ordering principle” that influenced “many people”. But for himself? He was raising questions and having doubts. Even Darwin had faced similar doubts as he discussed the implications of his theory with a close friend. For example, in an early draft of his Origin of Species, Darwin wrotethat nature was composed of “laws ordained by God to govern the universe.” Soon after sending his book to Asa Gray, he wrote, “I am inclined to look at everything as resulting from designed laws, with the details whether good or bad, left to the working out of what we may call chance.” (Within a year or so he would abandon the idea of design entirely; it was unnecessary, he realized, for his theory.).[vi]Darwin’s dangerous idea led to the two camps still existing today, namely those who advocate Intelligent Design and creationism, and the other camp that has chosen Darwinism as the explanation for all living things, and thus dispenses with any need for design or guiding intelligence to explain the origin and development of life.Fuller says that Darwin’s theory of natural selection maintains that all life evolves largely as a result of the environment, “thriving or dying as a result of their ability to adapt. This process can be wrenching; it leaves people trapped between two ways of thinking and believing, stranded between two existences.”[vii]  He concludes that, in the end, Darwin’s theory has “remade the world” from the Christian era to the Post-Christian world.[viii]Darwinism had a major influence on America not only through his own writings, but through other influential writers like Thoreau who converted to Darwinism after reading Darwin’s Origin of Species. Because Darwin had raised fundamental questions about the nature of life, his influence permeated novels and other works of literature, converting the man best known for transcendentalism and the sublimity of nature into a materialist seeing his formerly-sublime world as the product of mindless chance.In summary, Darwin’s 1859 book was “the single most important idea of the nineteenth century,” Fuller says. “It is also an account of issues and concerns that are still very much with us, including racism, one of the most intractable problems in American life, and the enduring conflict between science and religion.” [ix] And that was the very book that turned Thoreau into a Darwin disciple. Thereafter, his tainted pen helped spread Darwinism to the masses.For more on Randall Fuller’s research into Darwin’s influence on Thoreau and the Transcendentalists, see Evolution News & Science Today.[i] Randall Fuller “Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin.” Nature. June 15, 2017. 546:349-350.[ii] Randall Fuller “Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin.” Nature. June 15, 2017. p. 349.[iii] The Book That Changed America: How Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation, by Randall Fuller, New York: Viking. 2017. p. x.[iv] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[v] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[vi] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[vii] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.[viii] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.[ix] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, scientist, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. For more of his writings, see his Author Profile.last_img read more

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Science education needed to counteract food phobias and fables on social media — and you can help

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Popular food brands like Chipotle and Panera gain market share by feeding on American consumers’ lack of scientific knowledge. Their marketing caters to foodies and contributes to unfounded food phobias that have become more prevalent.In previous columns, I’ve shared examples of misinformation about food and modern agriculture that are unsupported by scientific truth, but routinely spoon-fed to consumers — and swallowed. Food labels, like the following, are signs of this lack of scientific understanding:• Antibiotic-free: There’s nothing wrong with this term, except that marketers such as Panera often use it to imply that food products from other sources do contain antibiotics by a sign in each store that reads “Our food is antibiotic free.” The truth is: health regulations require all food to be free of antibiotics.• rBST-free:  That is, without recombinant bovine growth hormone, a synthetic growth hormone used to stimulate a cow’s appetite resulting in increased milk production. The FDA has stated there is no difference between milk produced with or without rBST, because every drop of milk contains tiny amounts of the cow’s own natural BST (somatotropin) hormone. Our digestive system easily digests BST.• GMO-free: Genetically engineered (GMO) salmon were developed over 20 years ago. They have been shown to resist disease and grow rapidly. And they’re safe for human consumption — actually safer than wild caught salmon. Yet these fish, marketed in Canada, are still not permitted in the U.S. My favorite product that is advertised as “GMO-free” is Cheerios. Why? They’re made of oats. And oats have not ever been genetically modified.• Gluten-free: Have you seen the latest product proclaimed to be gluten-free? Believe it or not, there is gluten-free water! And it sells for a premium, no less. Gluten, a protein primarily in wheat, barley and rye, is a real concern for people with the autoimmune disorder, celiac disease. For them, it impairs the small intestine’s ability to absorb nutrients into the bloodstream. For the rest of us, it’s not a health concern, despite all the gluten-free labels.Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media platforms help spread the misinformation like wildfire. Orthorexia nervosa, which literally means a “fixation on righteous eating,” is a condition first coined about 20 years ago to describe an unhealthy obsession with eating only foods deemed healthy. I believe social media heightens this kind of unfounded insecurity about food.Food producers can use social media — and face-to-face conversations with non-farming friends, relatives and acquaintances — to help set the record straight about modern agriculture and food safety. And how science strengthens agriculture’s ability to meet the nutritional needs of a growing world population.How did we get from improved breeding of plants and animals to thinking that nothing is safe unless it has one of those “free-from-something-or-other” labels? The science that goes into improving agricultural productivity has its roots in the work of Gregor Mendel, a 19th century Austrian monk who experimented with cross breeding peas in his garden. Known as the father of genetics, he didn’t discover DNA. Rather, he discovered the role of base pairs of genes in heredity. While working with peas, he selected those with certain desirable traits to pass down generation to generation. This has led to later discoveries of seedless watermelons, polled (without horns) cattle, hybrids of corn, soybeans, wheat and cotton, and superior lines of pigs, cattle and other food-producing animals.Scientists have recently learned how to edit genes — that is, to snip from genes amino acids that cause undesirable genetic traits. This gene-editing is called CRISPR. For instance, CRISPR can be used to remove the genetic code associated with horn development from developing bovine embryos.This eliminates the need to surgically dehorn calves, a practice done to prevent calves from injuring each other and the cattlemen working with them. Cattle are typically dehorned as early as possible after birth. But this isn’t possible for cattle on the range, until the calves are weaned at six to ten months. By then, the procedure requires anesthesia and restraint of the calves.When the horn genetic code is removed in gene editing, no horn tissue develops in the calf. Even offspring of this calf do not develop horns.Genetic engineering also promotes human health. Insulin, which is used to treat people with diabetes, used to be extracted from the pancreas of cows at slaughter plants. In recent years, medical doctors have found through genetic engineering a much safer and higher quality source of insulin for individuals with diabetes.Through this genetic engineering process, the insulin-producing gene is inserted into common E. coli bacteria. The genetically modified bacteria are grown in huge vats to produce large quantities of insulin.Here’s another example: Some humans have a genetic disease that causes major blood vessels to swell in the throat. This swelling, triggered by a throat infection, causes extreme pressure. Without medical intervention, the patient will die. Medical researchers have identified a special C1 protein that modulates this inflammation, preventing the life-threatening reaction.Dutch researchers developed transgenic rabbits, with an inserted C1 gene, to produce milk that contains the C1 protein. The protein is extracted from the milk to produce pills to treat people with the C1 genetic defect, preventing throat swelling episodes and allowing them to lead a normal life. And genetic engineering is used in agriculture to increase productivity and improve resistance to disease and drought.A good dose of science education for consumers, politicians and regulators would go a long way toward promoting acceptance and advancement of GMO so farmers can produce a sufficient amount of food for the world population, which is projected to increase by another couple billion people by 2050.Of course, that will take years of message repetition to accomplish as to the safety of genetically engineered foods. But with your help in spreading the word, we could get there sooner. Meanwhile even with all of the caution and fear about genetically engineered food, transgender individuals have available to them sex re-assignment surgery including large doses of hormone therapy to become the individual they want to be. Go figure!last_img read more

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Planned Facebook Ads Go Big But Less Social — And Users Will Hate Them

first_imgTags:#advertising#Facebook#Mark Zuckerberg Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit At least in theory, the combination of Facebook’s scale, a full-page video ad takeover and, in time, linking views and reactions to the platform’s “social graph” could turn the tide in Facebook’s favor. There are also obvious opportunities for Facebook to leverage its scale, social graph and the “second screen” to help foster innovative advertising forms that span television, mobile and the Facebook site simultaneously. Earlier this year, for example, Facebook promoted the Academy Awards broadcast and provided data on how users responded to award winners in real-time.Facebook claims 680 million “active” monthly mobile users. If Facebook can leverage its scale across desktop and mobile, whether or not it simultaneously incorporate their knowledge of each user, these new video ads could be a huge success.Lead image via Flickr user brewbookscenter_img Even amongst college students, for example, who are likely to be very social media savvy, television advertising is clearly the most influential of all. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Facebook is reportedly working on full-screen autoplay video ads it will supposedly roll out no later than this summer. Facebook is expected to charge nearly $1 million for these new ads, which are designed to leverage Facebook’s massive scale — but not the company’s vaunted “social graph.”And that assumes Facebook users will sit still for ads that, per current reports, will take over your desktop screen and run for 15 seconds, up to three times a day per user. What are the odds of that? According to a report in Ad Age, the social media giant wants to offer at least four separate full-screen video ads every day. Facebook has reportedly been working with the ad industry on this effort since at least late last year. Initially, the 15-second autoplay ads will appear on Facebook’s desktop site; the social network is still working to bring them to its mobile app as well.I contacted Facebook for comment. A spokesperson’s response: “We’re not giving a comment here.”The Coming War With TVIf successful, the new ad platform could bring in nearly $1.5 billion in additional revenue to Facebook — and might also kick off a war with the television industry for major ad dollars.Television advertising in the U.S. alone generates over $70 billion in annual revenue — and the market is, surprisingly, still growing. Facebook’s new ads, though, could pose a direct threat. One of the core strengths of television advertising is its ability to “aggregate eyeballs” — that is, to bring together large numbers of people across multiple demographics. Facebook’s proposed new ad units would emulate this.For example, Facebook is expected to offer four daily “slots” for its video ads, each targeting a very large demographic:Women over 30Women under 30Men over 30Men under 30According to Ad Age, Facebook will cap the ads so that no user will see an ad more than three times in a day. It is still unclear if advertising executives will want to cut down the typical 30-second television ad to fit Facebook’s 15-second guideline, or if they’d create new ads especially for Facebook.Scale Not SocialFor all its talk about the inherent value of its “social graph” — Facebook’s supposedly unique understanding of its one billion users, their likes, dislikes and relationships — these proposed video ads owe basically nothing to the social graph and in this case, Facebook is relying upon its nearly unprecedented scale. There are few online properties – or any media properties of any sort – that can command massive network television-like audiences the way Facebook can. The front page of Yahoo, YouTube and Google may be the only equivalents.Such ads may also mark a strategic reversal inside Facebook. Just last summer, the company denied GM’s request for full-page “takeover” ads. At the time, Facebook’s VP for Global Marketing suggested that brands should focus on “social ads” and did not expect “traditional home-age takeover” ads in Facebook’s future. That is apparently no longer the case. Not that this is a bad thing. Facebook is probably wise to focus on new methods of monetizing its scale — and leveraging the potential of video display ads. If successful, such ads could even become a daily ritual — generating buzz that’s the equivalent of America’s Super Bowl.Consider that for this year, 30-second Super Bowl ads on television cost advertisers $3.8 million. The event had 111 million viewers. Facebook may be able to promise its advertisers a far larger audience every day. What Facebook can’t yet promise, of course, is whether its billion users will actually sit through — or even tolerate — such intrusive ads, even just once.Television Still Preferred For NowDespite its scale, Facebook must prove it can offer advertisers the equivalent of network television. Consumer surveys reveal that television advertising stands above all others in terms of influencing purchase decisions.  brian s halllast_img read more

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MS Dhoni and Sakshi wedding anniversary: ‘7 years of love, simplicity and togetherness’

first_imgMahendra Singh Dhoni and his wife Sakshi are celebrating their seventh marriage anniversary today in the Caribbean Island together and Twitter celebrated the occasion with equal fervour.Dhoni and Sakshi tied the knot on July 4, 2010 and have a daughter named Ziva, who was born on February 6, 2015.Former India cricketer Mohammad Kaif took to Twitter to Dhoni and Sakshi on completing seven years of their marriage and shared a photograph of his with the two.”A very Happy Anniversary MahiSakshi. Wish you great time ahead,” Kaif wrote.A very Happy Anniversary MahiSakshi. Wish you great times ahead. pic.twitter.com/eBfaGgXzeV- Mohammad Kaif (@MohammadKaif) July 3, 2017Sakshi and Ziva are in the West Indies with MS Dhoni, who is representing India in a five-match ODI series against West Indies.Sakshi has actively been sharing pictures of her time in West Indies on her Instagram account. Just a few days ago, she shared a photograph of hers with Shikhar Dhawan and Dwayne Bravo’s sons.Twitter was ecstatic on the occasion of Dhoni’s anniversary and the fans showered the couple with their wishes.7 years of love, simplicity and togetherness.?? Happy anniversary! #MahiSakshi pic.twitter.com/JhzCvldNEV- Shrusti? (@shrusti15) July 4, 2017Cuteee pics in internet today ??Happy Anniversary Mahisakshi pic.twitter.com/AjYJUh8VMK- payal ?? (@chasmish_girl) July 4, 2017Happy Anniversary MahiSakshi ?@msdhoni @SaakshiSRawat pic.twitter.com/0UduWqDv5radvertisement- Dream catcher ? (@Keerthie_Suriya) July 4, 20177 Years Of Amazing Partnership. Wishing A Very Happy Anniversary MahiSakshi .#Dhoni #MSDhoni pic.twitter.com/Tyy9ntlmyC- Sir Ravindra Jadeja (@SirJadeja) July 3, 2017India are currently 2-1 up in the five-match ODI series and will play the fifth ODI in Jamaica on July 6.last_img read more