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Vietnam’s Communist Party leaders warn of challenges ahead

first_imgHANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Senior members of Vietnam’s ruling Communist Party caution that their country faced opportunities and challenges ahead, as they began a key meeting to set the nation’s path for the next five years. Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong declared, “Globalization and global integration are on the right track, but they are met with the rise of extreme nationalism, strategic competition and trade wars.” Trong said the coronavirus pandemic compelled the world to strategically adjust policies. The National Party Congress will also be choosing the nation’s top leaders. Trong is likely to be selected for a third five-year term as the nation’s most powerful leader.last_img read more

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Lawyers in the Legislature

first_imgLawyers in the Legislature Quiñones works for compromise Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Culture shock jolted 14-year-old John Quiñones when his family moved from Puerto Rico to the Orlando area in 1979 searching for a better quality of life and education opportunities.“While I could read and understand English, I still had that difficulty in communication and going through school my first few years. I had to adapt and that was challenging,” said 40-year-old Quiñones, a Republican state representative and attorney from Kissimmee.So one of the first bills he was proud to back when elected to the House in 2002 was giving students a chance to move on to higher education in community college, even if they do not pass the FCAT test. They must meet other high school requirements and scores on the SAT or ACT may be considered as alternative assessment exams.“Because of that legislation, my son is in college,” Quiñones still hears from parents.“That opened doors for a lot of students, students who might have had difficulties in language, such as myself,” said Quiñones, who received his bachelor’s at the University of Central Florida, while working at Disney World, and his law degree from St. Thomas University in 1992.“Honestly, I was not the best high school student. When I started to pay for college, I got smarter. I wasn’t going to waste my money,” he said with a laugh.The son of a lawyer who directed the workers’ compensation office in Puerto Rico, Quiñones’ own training as a lawyer comes in handy at the legislature. During a House Justice Council debate on repealing joint and several liability in negligence cases, his first instinct was to flip open a Florida statute book and ask the bill’s sponsor lots of questions before voting in favor of the bill with reservations.Quiñones voted for the bill, along with 92 others, on the House floor on March 16.But he said his experience as a family law mediator helps him even more as a lawmaker.“Similar to what we do in mediation, you have to listen to both sides and try to understand both sides of an issue and try to reach a positive compromise. There’s a lot of that in politics,” Quiñones said.Asked whether it is frustrating to chair the House Claims Committee when it is well-known that Speaker Allan Bense does not like to pay claims bills, Quiñones said what has been most exasperating was last year’s experience.“We have heard all claims bills in the House and the Senate has chosen not to hear one single claims bill,” he said.After a recent meeting with Bense and his staff, Quiñones said: “I am hopeful this year. I think there is a mood that we want to get some of the claims out of the House. Unfortunately, we need to get the same cooperation out of the Senate.”The House Claims Committee did an interim study that reviewed House and Senate claims bill procedures and recommended how to streamline the process. The findings that have been made into a successfully approved committee bill (PCB CLAM 06-02). Sen. Bill Posey, R-Rockledge, is sponsoring the proposal in the Senate (SB 2088).“A lot of objections the Senate president raises are that the process is controlled by lobbyists, and there is frustration that the claimant won’t get money at the end,” Quiñones said. “The bill we have established would get rid of that objection. It creates a joint committee and prioritizes those claims on any given year. We are looking at how to make the claims bill more effective and get moving on some reform.”Moving favorably through the legislature so far this year are identical bills in both chambers that would do away with the deadline on post-conviction DNA testing. Quiñones and Rep. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Ft. Lauderdale, are co-sponsors of HB 61 CS (from the Governmental Operations Committee), and Sen. Alex Villalobos, R-Miami, is the sponsor of SB 186.Quiñones invites the lawyers of Florida to communicate more with legislators.“The things they face on a day-to-day basis, the application of the law, and flaws in the law, it’s a good idea for them to keep us abreast,” Quiñones said. “They are the ones in the trenches. We hear from lobbyists a lot on this and that. We don’t hear enough from lawyers. Attorneys need to be more involved in the political process.“I am not saying every legislator should be an attorney. We need a myriad of experiences. But I think, predominantly, there should be an attorney-oriented legislature so we can understand the laws and debates.”Quiñones is one lawyer-legislator untroubled by the new lobbyist reform that insists lawmakers pay their own way.“We can’t accept gifts and go to fancy dinners. That’s fine with me. It gives me a lot more time to spend with my family.”Because he got homesick for his family, last year Quiñones and his wife, Jacqueline Mattson, decided to live in Tallahassee during the session and have enrolled 9-year-old Natalia and 7-year-old Alexander in a Tallahassee school during those months. Lawyers in the Legislaturecenter_img April 1, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

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James Peters Slams Falconets over Poor Tactics against China

first_imgThe Nigerians will confront Spain in one of the quarter-final matches to be played in Concarneau on Thursday.But giving his assessment yesterday, Peters, said the team should put its act together, improve on its tactic rather than depend on luck.“If we play like this without tactics- just keep hoping that if they score- we will score, then we will be out. We are not playing tactically. Rather, we are playing, ‘if God gives us victory, we will take it’. That is what we are playing –no tactics,” Peters said.Nigeria progressed into the quarter-finals after grabbing a 1-1 draw with China on Monday with the equaliser coming in the last minute of the added time the efforts of Aishat Bello and Rasheedat Ajibade. China right-back, Jiaxing Dou deflected the ball into the net for an own goal.While offering insights into the performance of the team which lost 1-0 to Germany and edged Haiti in the other group fixtures, Peters said it amounted to bad tactics on the part of the team to always wait until the last minute before scoring.Peters advised the team to be more tactical against Spain and exhibit instinct to score goals instead of playing attacking football only when they are pegged back.“Waiting until the last minute to equalize is a bad tactics. I expect them to be a bit tactical when we meet Spain. They should know what they are doing as a team. What are they doing up front when they lose the ball and how do they defend when the opponents take the ball? Are they doing pressing, or doing middle pressing and what are they going to do when they have the ball?” Peters asked.He said the whole team handled by Christopher Danjuma, should adopt the pressing from the backline approach against the Spaniards and stay behind the ball when they lose possession and defend as a whole team.Meanwhile, substitute Aishat Bello whose last-gasp effort earned Falconets the one-all draw that qualified Nigeria for the quarter final has admitted that she thought the campaign was all over for her and her colleagues.With Nigeria trailing 1-0 deep into second-half stoppage time the 17-year-old got in behind the Chinese backline on the right flank before playing in a well-driven cross towards Ajibade to finish up.But in the haste to clear it away, the ball bounced on China right-back, Jiaxing Dou, before resting in the net for the equaliser that broke the hearts of the Far Easterners!“It was not easy. I was on the bench and I was thinking that maybe we had lost the game,” Bello told FIFA.com after Monday’s game at the Stade du Clos Gastel.After the Falconets has booked their passage to face winner of Group C, Spain, on Thursday, Bello took a deep breath before insisting that she knew Nigeria was not going to exit the tournament in the group stage.“But I gave myself confidence that we were not going to lose this game and that I have to do my best when I get on to get the result,” stressed Bello who from playing together with the rest of the team anticipated one of Nigeria’s forward liners to latch up to her cross to finish up.“The good thing was my player (Ajibade) was there to finish for me, so I was very, very happy.”Though it was a tough contest for Christopher Danjuma’s side against their Asian opponents, Nigeria’s motivation never waivered, full in the knowledge that one goal would change their fortunes.“The match was very important and we wanted to win the match,” said Super Falconets midfielder Peace Efih. “We wanted to make sure we went through, that’s why we fought to the end. In the second half, we just had to push and keep the spirit of the team moving. It’s all about winning, it’s all about fighting to the end.”With that level of desire, Nigeria heads into their next challenge in Concarneau on Thursday, as Falconets meet Spain in the quarter-finals. “The quarter-finals won’t be easy, but we will fight to the finish,” Efih said. “We believe in putting out our best every time. With our togetherness, we believe we will get somewhere.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram UNDER-20 WOMEN’S WORLD CUPOlawale Ajimotokan in AbujaFormer Technical Director of Nigeria Football Federation (NFF), James Peters, has declared as negative the tactics adopted by the Super Falconets at the on-going FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in France.last_img read more