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Georgia Cotton Crop

first_imgWhat was an extremely promising Georgia cotton crop was devastated when Hurricane Michael ravaged south Georgia Oct. 10-11. According to Jared Whitaker, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton agronomist, the prospects of 1,500 to 1,800 pounds of dryland cotton for some producers were reduced, resulting in 80 to 90 percent losses in some fields.“It’s much worse than I thought it would be,” Whitaker said. “But it does depend on where your field is located. Southwest of (Tifton, Georgia), it’s terrible, in Bainbridge and Donalsonville. Even if you consider the line from Cordele to Augusta, pictures I’ve received from Washington County will make you feel sick.”Whitaker had such high hopes for this year’s crop that he believed it would have broken the state yield record. Blake Crabtree, UGA Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Worth County, agreed.“We talked to one farmer last weekend who was picking in a field and said it was averaging between 1,500 and 1,600 pounds. They started back picking (Sunday) and it was averaging about 700 pounds,” Crabtree said. “I’m thinking we’ve got about a bale or two bales per acre of loss. You can ride by these cotton fields and see it laying all on the ground.”What made Hurricane Michael even more destructive was timing. Although it’s never ideal to experience a hurricane during the growing season, a storm strike in early October, when cotton is near harvest, made the impact even more severe. Whitaker estimates that over 60 percent of this year’s crop was extremely susceptible to storm damage.  Growers are now faced with the gloomy prospect of trying to move forward and deciding what to do with the cotton left in the field.“I think what we do from here on out is going to vary in a lot of places. In some places I’ve seen, I don’t think we’ll even pull a picker in there to harvest the crop. I think we lost so much cotton that it wouldn’t be profitable to even harvest it,” Whitaker said.In southeast Georgia, farmers slipped by with as little as 15 percent loss compared to southwest Georgia, where farmers could be looking at total losses in some fields, he said.Whitaker estimates that 15 percent of this year’s crop was already picked before Hurricane Michael arrived, while a small portion of the crop was planted late enough to be relatively safe. The Georgia Cotton Commission encourages producers to document damage and losses before, during and after cleanup and to keep financial records of cleanup and repair.Whitaker adds that producers should contact their local UGA Extension agents to report any losses or for more information about estimating storm damage.For up-to-date information on Georgia’s cotton crop, see www.ugacotton.com.last_img read more

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Wydad Return to CAS over CAF Champions League

first_imgThe second leg of May’s Champions League final ended in controversy as Wydad Casablanca refused to continue playing after a row over the Video Assisted Referee (VAR) system.Play was halted when VAR was unavailable to judge a disallowed equaliser.VAR had been set up on the side of the pitch, but the players had not been told it was not working, although officials were aware.The referee then awarded the victory to three-time former champions Esperance.The Tunisian side were leading 1-0 (2-1 on aggregate) in Saturday’s final, which was played over two legs. VAR had been used in the first leg.But in the second leg, Walid El Karti’s header for Wydad was disallowed for an infringement.Both sides then lodged complaints with CAF following an initial ruling from CAF that the second leg should be replayed.The court’s first ruling in August said that CAF’s executive committee “did not have jurisdiction” to order that the final be replayed.Following that decision from CAS, the disciplinary committee at CAF ruled Esperance to be the winners of the African Champions LeagueWydad then lodged a further case with CAF and its Appeal Board, which on 15 September rejected the Moroccan club’s request.“…the Board underlined the fact that the absence of the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) has no legal effects whatsoever and that its sole purpose is to aid the referee to take the correct decision…,” the CAF Appeal Board decision explained.“That the referee is vested with the power to have the final decision on the field of play since the start of the game, and that his decision is not up to review by the Appeal Board.“The match officials’ reports were very clear that the Wydad Athletic Club’s players refused to resume the match even after several attempts conducted by the referee, to the point that the referee waited almost 90 minutes before he whistled the end of the match.“The Appeal Board has noted that the stoppage of almost 90 minutes was due to the Wydad Athletic Club’s players’ failure to resume the match, the players were then instructed to resume play by the referee who has seen his attempts fail to no avail.“Therefore the Appeal Board confirms that the match was forfeited by Wydad Athletic Club because their players refused to resume the match.”The Appeal Board added that according to CAF’s own statutes, a case would be allowed to be lodged directly with CAS before the 25 September.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Wydad’s President Said Naciri confirmed on Monday, as he was re-elected as the president of the Moroccan Football League, that they would go to CAS to contest the decision to award the disputed CAF Champions League to Tunisia’s Esperance. He insisted CAF’s statutes permits it.“We will defend our rights until the end. For two months we have been fighting this “oppression”. Esperance don’t deserve to win the cup in the way we witnessed in Rades,” he told BBC Sport.“Our next step is to take the case back to CAS to seek fairness.”last_img read more