0

Ararat Anomaly to Be Imaged in Hi-Res

first_imgThe “Ararat anomaly,” an unusual structure at the 15,300′ level of Mt. Ararat in Turkey, is getting increased scrutiny with high-resolution satellite imaging.  Leonard David reported on Live Science that Porcher Taylor of Satellite Imaging Corporation has created a 3-D flyover movie of the site from Ikonos satellite data, and that Geo-Eye I, to be launched next year, will double the resolution of the site to 0.4 meter per pixels.    Buried under a glacier, the Ararat anomaly drew attention because of “its relatively smooth surface texture and unusual physical composition, according to some interpretations.”  Some have considered it a possible location of the remains of Noah’s Ark.It was nice to see Live Science give fair treatment to this story.  Our new era of Google Earth and hi-resolution imaging should be able to shed some light on the famous mountain.  For most of the recent decades, political tensions and local hazards have made the search frustratingly difficult.  Eyes from orbit may be able to make the job of sifting evidence much easier.    A historical string of eyewitness accounts has propelled the brave with ark fever (see noahsarksearch.com).  So far, however, the data collected have done more to rule out some promising sites than to find what would certainly be the most interesting archaeological artifact ever found, if it exists – and even many ark searchers have their doubts a wooden vessel could have survived at all.  Some are not even sure this is the right mountain.    The eyewitness accounts, tantalizing as they are, do not rise to the level of evidence required to convince a fair-minded skeptic.  Gathering more data quietly, without making outlandish claims, is the best thing that can be done.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

0

Wiwigs Women’s Long Wavy Wig Honey Blonde – Lovely but fake looking at head line

first_img The colour very blonde got told looks real tho :/ the front of the wig unfortunately looks fake as u c the net i just popped on a headband an all ok part from headband pushes it off a bit. Maybe this exact wig but with a fringe?. If so please wiwigs lemme no 🙂 . The colour very blonde got told looks real tho :/ the front of the wig unfortunately looks fake as u c the net i just popped on a headband an all ok part from headband pushes it off a bit. Maybe this exact wig but with a fringe?. If so please wiwigs lemme no 🙂 . Features of Women’s Long Wavy Wig Honey BlondeBrand New, with TagsColour Code: #22-613Material: Top Quality and No Flammable Kanekalon Synthetic Hair. Feel like real hair. 100% Originated from Japan. Best in Wigs.Head size: Adjustable size to fit head circumference approx. 20″-23″. Most head sizes are within this range. Customers can adjust the hook inside the wig to get the right size for you.Delivery: 1-3 WORKING DAYS from payment cleared. Please ignore the Amazon estimation (3-12 days) which is not accurate. Lovely and glamorous, only one thing no clips, but you can sew these on yourself. Lovely and glamorous, only one thing no clips, but you can sew these on yourself. Lovely will wear it all winter better than a hat and more glam. I recommended purchasing a k’yrissma lace front of you want a day to day natural look. Their very cheap only 38 including post and packaging and arrive in 3 days this wis is lovley but for the price utd not like it is i. The photo i men it’s lovely for a first wig and is good for costume looks?. Lovely but fake looking at head line. Very nice n long but u will have to wear a hat or hair band with it as u can tell it a wig i wear my hat with it n it look kind of real but not dare wearing it alone tho as it very fake looking at the head line hope this help anyone who thinking of buying one. Lovely will wear it all winter better than a hat and more glam. Stunning, good quality, awaiting for more of these too come in. Fabulous looking wig, lasted a lot longer than your average ‘synthetic’, but the compliments i recieved how ‘healthy’ my hair is (whilst wearing) gave me a big boost as nobody knew i had been hiding my alopecia for quite some time before i told my friends and family. I have looked everywhere for the same one, as last time o checked, this seller had none in stock, fan quality, kind to scalp,did not irritate my scalp(mostly bald) at all really. ?, gave me back my life, even if onlynon the occasions i wore it. I’m no drama-queen, plus i don’t review unless i’m ??? sure of any product i review. Please feel free to ask me whatever x. I recommended purchasing a k’yrissma lace front of you want a day to day natural look. Their very cheap only 38 including post and packaging and arrive in 3 days this wis is lovley but for the price utd not like it is i. The photo i men it’s lovely for a first wig and is good for costume looks?. Lovely but fake looking at head line. Very nice n long but u will have to wear a hat or hair band with it as u can tell it a wig i wear my hat with it n it look kind of real but not dare wearing it alone tho as it very fake looking at the head line hope this help anyone who thinking of buying one. Stunning, good quality, awaiting for more of these too come in. Fabulous looking wig, lasted a lot longer than your average ‘synthetic’, but the compliments i recieved how ‘healthy’ my hair is (whilst wearing) gave me a big boost as nobody knew i had been hiding my alopecia for quite some time before i told my friends and family. I have looked everywhere for the same one, as last time o checked, this seller had none in stock, fan quality, kind to scalp,did not irritate my scalp(mostly bald) at all really. ?, gave me back my life, even if onlynon the occasions i wore it. I’m no drama-queen, plus i don’t review unless i’m ??? sure of any product i review. Please feel free to ask me whatever x. Stunning, good quality, awaiting for more of these too come in!!Lovely but fake looking at head line SummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-02-06 01:57:49Reviewed Item Women’s Long Wavy Wig Honey BlondeRating 3.1 / 5  stars, based on  7  reviewsPrice£18.99last_img read more

0

2016 Ohio State Fair Outstanding Market Exhibitors

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Photos by Meghan Bruns. The winners by age in the Beef Outstanding Market Exhibitor competition were: (9) Carly Sanders, Fayette Co. and Garret Agle, Clark Co.; (10) Sydney Sanders, Fayette Co. and Drew Waymouth, Clark Co.; (11) Brice Phelps, Union Co.; (12) Paige Pence, Clark Co.; (13) Alex Linder, Huron Co.; (14) Allison Davis, Carroll Co.; (15) Elizabeth Heintz, Auglaize Co.; (16) Adam Kinsman, Fulton Co.; (17) Carter Roy Smith, Holmes Co.; and (18) Curtis Harsh, Delaware Co. The overall winner was Carter Roy Smith. The winners by age in the Swine Outstanding Market Exhibitor competition were: (9) Seth Fearon, Darke Co.; (10) Jesse Stewart, Clinton Co.; (11) Luke Spracklen, Clark Co; (12) Madelyn Fearon, Darke Co.; (13) Lindsey Dore, Knox Co.; (14) Madelyn Harrison, Butler Co.; (15) Jenna Siegel, Marion Co.; (16) Micah Smock, Shelby Co.; (17) Kaci Way, Wayne Co.; and (18) Katie Siegel, Marion Co. The overall winner was Katie Siegel. The winners by age in the Goat Outstanding Market Exhibitor competition were: (9) Hayden Smith, Holmes Co.; (10) Halee McDade, Butler Co.; (11) Eli Hollingsworth, Champaign Co.; (12) Adam Bensman, Miami Co.; (13) Savanna Harriman, Richland Co.; (14) Tiffany Sunday, Pickaway Co.; (15) Austin Fourman, Darke Co.; (16) Grace Day, Ross Co.; (17) Kiley Harriman, Richland Co.; and (18) Olivia McDade, Darke Co. The overall winner was Tiffany Sunday. The winners by age in the Lamb Outstanding Market Exhibitor competition were: (9) Nicholas Johnson, Union Co.; (10) Ava Shroyer, Logan Co.; (11) Bailee Amstutz, Union Co.;  (12) Hanna Delong, Champaign Co.; (13) Ian Johnson, Union Co.; (14) Arianna Spina, Champaign Co.; (15) Seth Wasilewski, Richland Co.; (16) Jacob Fowler, Guernsey Co.; (17) Dalton Huhn, Guernsey Co.; and (18) Lauren Ott, Huron Co. The overall winner was Lauren Ott. The winners by age in the Poultry Outstanding Market Exhibitor competition were: (9) Anessa Ruggles, Huron Co.; (10) Masson Sanders, Richland Co.; (11) Remington Price, Hancock Co.; (12) Delanie Johnson, Jefferson Co.; (13) Hayden Johnson, Jefferson Co.; (14) Katie Conley, Wyandot Co.; (15) Seth Abel, Licking Co.; (16) Zac Ortman, Perry Co.; (17) Kirsten Kochel, Huron Co.; and (18) Kaci Carter, Harrison Co. The overall winner was Remington Price.last_img read more

0

Solar Blooms in the Rural U.S.

first_imgA report released this summer by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) documents the tremendous growth in solar energy driven by electric cooperatives. Electric cooperatives (co-ops) are utilities that are owned by their customers. They serve 56% of the land area of the U.S — mainly in rural regions — and are increasingly providing solar energy to their customers. In fact, by 2019, co-op solar capacity is expected to surpass 1 gigawatt (GW), enough to power more than 200,000 homes. The growth in co-op solar is exciting, and it’s part of a larger story of solar expansion throughout the rural U.S. The costs of solar energy are declining, more customers want their homes powered by solar panels, and the rural energy economy is transforming. NRECA’s recent report is the result of a multi-year project to identify and address the barriers and drivers of growth for co-op solar, a project funded by a $3.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This good news story is in part a tribute to the value of the research, development, and deployment programs housed at DOE — and an important reminder that we need Congress to continue to fund the DOE programs that are building our clean energy future.RELATED ARTICLESWisconsin Sees a Boom in Community SolarSolar Energy Can Make the Grid More ResilientCost of Installed Solar Continues to FallSolar Power Alone Won’t Solve Energy or Climate NeedsA California Utility Looks for New Answers in Solar Integration Puzzle Bigger and broader: more solar for more people Co-ops are scaling up the solar projects they develop and more frequently buying power from large solar plants. Historically, the solar energy in cooperative service regions has come from small projects and distributed generation. In 2014, co-ops provided about 113 megawatts (MW) of solar capacity, and the average size of a co-op installation was 25 kilowatts (kW). By 2017, the total capacity grew to over 850 MW, and, now, the average installation provides 1 MW — 40 times the size just four years ago. This change stems in large part from partnerships between distribution co-ops and their generation and transmission counterparts to develop or buy energy from larger solar power plants and serve more members. Co-ops are not only investing in new large-scale solar, they also are expanding access through distributed, smaller projects. Community solar programs allow customers to buy a share of a solar project and then benefit from the electricity generated. These projects enable people to take advantage of solar energy even when they cannot install their own rooftop solar panels. They may not be able to afford the large up-front costs, don’t own their home and can’t alter the roof, or have rooftops that are shaded or inconveniently oriented. More and more rural communities are subscribing to community solar programs, thanks in large part to the more than 190 co-ops that have community solar projects or are currently planning them. These creative approaches can help co-ops bring new resources to their rural constituencies and transform solar energy into a more accessible resource. Accessibility is especially important for co-ops, which serve 93% of the nation’s “persistent poverty” counties — where the poverty rate has exceeded 20% of the population for the past 30 years. Rural households also spend much more of their income on energy bills than others, according to a report also released this summer. As the energy transition continues full swing, it’s important to work creatively to ensure that it happens equitably — and that all communities have access to clean, affordable energy (including energy efficiency) and the accompanying job opportunities. Co-ops are especially well-situated to do this work. The rapid expansion of solar in rural areas is not limited to co-ops. Investor-owned utilities also are pushing for more solar generation in rural communities. Late last year, American Electric Power, which serves 11 states, filed a request for proposals (RFP) for 400 MW of solar energy in Ohio, adding to an energy portfolio that already includes several wind and solar farms. The RFP will prioritize sites in Appalachian Ohio, create permanent manufacturing jobs, and hire Ohioan military veterans. Ohio’s announcement is part of promising growth throughout the rural Midwest, where clean energy jobs grew by 6% from 2015 to 2016, outpacing job growth in other sectors by a long shot. Together, cooperatives and other utilities are creating a new green economy throughout the rural U.S., creating jobs and expanding access to inexpensive, clean energy. Rural communities are demanding clean energy One of the remarkable features of this solar growth is that it’s driven by consumer demand. Co-ops, being member-owned, have a responsibility to meet the requests of their customers, and their customers are asking for solar energy. In a survey conducted by NRECA, 68% of co-ops were motivated to expand solar energy by a desire to increase consumer-member satisfaction, and 59% were motivated by consumer demand for solar offerings. These were the two greatest drivers identified in the survey, and they speak to the growing enthusiasm for clean energy in the rural U.S. This growth is made possible thanks to the extraordinary decline in the cost of solar energy. The installed cost of large-scale solar energy declined by 71% from 2008 to 2016 across the country, thanks in part to federal funding for innovation at the Department of Energy. However, we cannot take it for granted that costs will continue to decline on their own. Earlier this year, the Trump administration imposed tariffs on imports of solar tariffs, a shortsighted and counterproductive move that threatened to undermine the remarkable growth the solar industry has seen in recent years. Developers believe the tariffs have dampened growth this year — but not as significantly as initially expected. Increased funding for Department of Energy innovation programs, especially those focused on solar panel manufacturing, and continued action from policymakers at all levels will allow the remarkable growth to continue and bring clean and inexpensive power to more people. Despite uncertainty in federal energy policy, solar projects keep breaking records for the lowest price, with the latest record power-purchase agreement coming in around 2.4 cents/kilowatt-hour (¢/kWh). That’s cheaper than the average wholesale electricity price in the region, which was 3.4¢/kWh in 2017 — and far cheaper than average levelized cost of energy from a new gas plant, about 6¢/kWh. Costs are on the decline, demand is surging, and the future is bright for solar energy.   Arjun Krishnaswami is a policy analyst in the climate and clean energy program of the National Resource Defense Council. This post originally appeared at the NRDC’s Expert Blog.last_img read more

0

Video technology provider Harmonics MediaGrid sha

first_imgVideo technology provider Harmonic’s MediaGrid shared storage system is now interoperable with the Adobe Anywhere for video collaborative workflow platform. Integration of the two products enables media organisations to centralise and manage media delivery services from a primary location while giving users of Adobe professional video tools the benefit of collaborating remotely and the best available quality that can be delivered over the available network connection, according to the pair.Adobe Anywhere is a collaborative workflow platform that enables users of Adobe professional video solutions to work together, using centralised media, across standard networks. According to Harmonic, the MediaGrid shared storage system provides the bandwidth and storage capacity needed to support the on-demand adaptive bit rate transcoding used by Adobe Anywhere transcode engines to stream content over bandwidth connections that may lack performance normally needed to edit centrally stored high-resolution, high-quality images.“Adobe Anywhere brings together teams of talent to collaborate and create productions from virtually any location where there is network connectivity. Many editors say now, even in remote environments that don’t have high bandwidth, the combination of MediaGrid and Adobe Anywhere makes it possible to edit efficiently,” said Michael Coleman, senior product manager, collaborative workflows, professional video at Adobe. “Today’s announcement ensures users can tap into the full potential of Adobe Anywhere to enable truly effective remote editing workflows.” Harmonic will exhibit at IBC on stand 1.B20 and Adobe will exhibit on stand 7.G27last_img read more