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Leprechaun Legion expands to all athletic clubs

first_imgNotre Dame’s student body has always been a spirited group, but this year, the Leprechaun Legion is making changes that they hope will improve the overall atmosphere of all sporting events. “Our goal is to try to find different ways to get students to come to games,” Matthew Cunningham, president of Leprechaun Legion, said.  “We want to keep them entertained and engaged and loud and to create kind of a home field advantage.” To encourage maximum participation from the student body, the Legion has recently decided to expand itself so that every sport will have its own loud, boisterous student section. “The Legion last year focused on basketball,” vice president, Kristen Stoutenburgh, said. “It’s historically been men’s basketball so we expanded to encompass not just the student section at basketball games but also the student section at all sporting events. “Every student on campus is part of the Leprechaun Legion.” But for those who want to be more involved in the Legion than simply attending various athletic contests, new changes in the organization’s leadership structure will provide a way. The Leprechaun Legion board is comprised of an executive council, board leaders, marketing members, and the board of student representatives. Essentially, the board will work to find areas in which the student section can improve, Cunningham said. “We have weekly meetings and we talk Notre Dame athletics about how to make them the best that they can possibly be,” Stoutenburgh said. “There are also individual sports committees, which take charge of the student section for their particular sport.  Any student can join a sports committee.” “I think we have a great student section,” Cunningham said.  “I think part of the reason people come to Notre Dame is the great athletic programs.  But we can do better.” He noted that last year’s decision to add music to the football games as an example. “It added a great dimension to the stadium atmosphere,” Cunningham said. Other things like the Leprechaun Legion shirts, which were distributed at several sporting events early in the year, serve to bring the student body together as a united force, Stoutenburgh said. “They’re not just there to watch.  They’re there to be a fan and support their team,” she said. The bigger, more excited student sections will unite fans, but they will also lend support to the athletes. “We want to be the best, not only for our own enjoyment but also to support the players and the coaches,” Stoutenburgh said.  “Athletes know the Legion stands behind them.” The energy the student section generates can play a crucial role in Notre Dame games. “Coaches will say ‘Yeah, the crowd was great today, it really gave us a boost when we needed it,’” Cunningham said. “That’s what we’re trying to do here ­­- give the students and coaches that extra energy.” In the end, the Leprechaun Legion serves two purposes.  It is a voice for the student body within the athletic department and it brings fans and athletes together. “There’s not that big separation between us,” Stoutenburgh said.  “We’re all one team.” For more information on the Leprechaun Legion, email legion@nd.edu with your name and sport of interest.last_img read more

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Holiday planting

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaThe winter holidays are perfect for eating turkey, watching football and planting shrubs in your landscape. If you don’t ordinarily associate planting shrubs with the holidays, it’s not because the two don’t go together.”It’s really an ideal time,” said Bob Westerfield, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist. And that’s not just because you have some time off for the holiday.”Planting now will allow several months for the plants’ root systems to get established before the hot weather starts next summer,” Westerfield said. “Summer is when our landscape plants are really stressed, and the plants can handle that stress much better with a better developed root system.”Think ‘roots’Like planting at Thanksgiving, roots don’t automatically come to mind when you think of landscape plants. You can’t see them, and even if you could, you wouldn’t be impressed.But the roots have to supply all the water and nutrients the plant needs to grow a top that will impress you. And the best time for the roots to grow is during the fall and winter.Fall-planted ornamentals normally have a supply of carbohydrates and other food substances stored in their roots from the past growing season. So with little demand from the tops, the roots are able to grow and become well-established before the next spring.The plant can divert all its energy into developing a good supply of roots, Westerfield said. Then when spring does come, the plant will be able to pop with growth.Best time”For deciduous trees and shrubs, the best time for root growth is when they’re dormant,” he said, “after they’ve been exposed to some chilling temperatures.”What about the cold stress? “For the most part, that’s really not a concern in Georgia,” Westerfield said. “Our soil temperatures just don’t get that cold.”In fact, most of Georgia’s soil temperatures don’t get low enough to keep the roots from growing all winter.The Thanksgiving holidays aren’t too late for planting. For that matter, Westerfield said, neither are the Christmas holidays, or January, or February.”It’s an ideal time, actually,” he said. “About the only bad thing is that you might run into some weather that’s not very pleasant for planting.”Plants availableSupplies of landscape plants are less plentiful than in the spring. But Westerfield said that’s not really a hindrance.”Generally, the plants are there,” he said. “Sales are slower — that’s true. But you can usually find the plants you want. They may not have the size you might look for in the spring, but they’ll reach that size better next spring if they’re already established in your landscape.”When you plant in the fall, Westerfield said, do almost everything just as you would in the spring. The only big difference is that you don’t want to fertilize in the fall. Wait until next spring for that.You don’t need to prune, either, unless you need to remove structural problems or damaged branches. You don’t want to encourage foliage growth during the fall and winter.Water the plant as much as it needs, Westerfield said. Anytime it’s dry during the fall or winter, plants need watering just as they would during a dry spring or summer.They can be much more forgiving if you’re a day late watering them in the fall, though. Their real test won’t come until next summer.(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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NU, Muhammadiyah call for postponement of regional elections over COVID-19 concerns

first_imgRead also: Group files lawsuit demanding KPU, Bawaslu postpone Medan elections“For the sake of the nation’s safety and proper implementation [of the regional elections], the KPU should postpone the 2020 elections until the situation has improved.”Muhammadiyah also urged members of the public to practice discipline and abide by the government’s COVID-19 protocols, as well as to refrain from producing and/or disseminating false information regarding the current state of affairs so as to prevent any conflicts.“We urge every member of Muhammadiyah to comply with the central board’s instructions in regard to religious, social and education affairs, as well as other public activities,” the organization said.The two prominent Muslim organizations also advised the public against participating in Idul Fitri mudik (exodus) earlier this year over COVID-19 concerns.It was previously reported that the government was set to draft a regulation to restrict mass gatherings during the upcoming regional elections in an effort to prevent COVID-19 transmission.Home Minister Tito Karnavian said he would propose either a revision to the existing KPU regulation or a specific government regulation in lieu of law (Perppu) for the matter.Tito emphasized that COVID-19 health protocols had to be enforced not only on voting day but at all stages of the electoral process, including during campaign events. Indonesia’s largest Muslim organizations, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) and Muhammadiyah, have urged the government to consider delaying the upcoming regional elections amid heightened concerns over the COVID-19 crisis.As reported on NU’s official website, the organization has called on the General Elections Commission (KPU), the government and the House of Representatives to postpone the major political event, set to take place on Dec. 9, until the health crisis has abated.“Crowds are inevitable, regardless of stricter health protocols,” the organization said in a statement on Sunday. Topics :center_img Furthermore, NU said postponement was a sensible call considering the public’s penchant for festive mass campaigns ahead of the elections, which would only increase the risk of coronavirus contagion among the public.“NU suggests that the government reallocate the elections budget to the [mitigation] of the health crisis and its real social impact on society,” the statement read.Similarly, Muhammadiyah said in a statement on Monday that public health and safety should remain the top priority during the present emergency, given that coronavirus cases had continued to mount across the country.“Regarding the 2020 elections, the central board of Muhammadiyah calls on the KPU to specifically reconsider […] the elections and campaign rules that entail the gathering of many people,” the statement, signed by chairperson Haedar Nashir and general secretary Abdul Mu’ti read, emphasizing that the KPU should coordinate with the Home Ministry, the House and other related departments regarding the issue.last_img read more