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Five stories in the news for today Oct 4

first_imgFive stories in the news for Wednesday, Oct. 4———EDMONTON ATTACK SUSPECT ORDERED TO LEAVE U.S.American authorities say a Somali refugee accused of attacking a police officer and running down four pedestrians in Edmonton was ordered removed from the country in 2011 by an immigration judge. They say Abdulahi Hasan Sharif was ordered sent back to Somalia on Sept. 22, 2011, but he didn’t report for departure on Jan. 24, 2012, and efforts to find him were not successful. Sharif faces 11 charges in connection with the Edmonton incident.———FOURTH CANADIAN CONFIRMED DEAD IN LAS VEGAS SHOOTINGAn Alberta model with two young sons and a restaurant employee about to be promoted to manager are among the four Canadians confirmed dead in Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas. Tara Roe was 34 and lived in Okotoks. Her family has issued a statement saying they were devastated by “this unthinkable tragedy.” Calla Medig, who grew up in Jasper, Alta., was also shot and killed in the attack. Medig had taken time Her boss at Moxie’s restaurant in west Edmonton says Medig was due to be promoted on Thursday.———PM TRUDEAU TO VISIT U.S. AND MEXICO.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will visit Washington and Mexico City next week amid early signs of turbulence in the NAFTA negotiations. He will meet with U.S. President Donald Trump, then with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto. Canadian officials say the trip was not specifically designed around NAFTA and began with an invitation to a women-in-business summit in Washington, coupled with Trudeau’s long-standing plan to visit Mexico. But trade will come up, they said.———MORNEAU: CHANGES TO TAX PLAN REQUIREDFinance Minister Bill Morneau says changes will be necessary to the government’s contentious tax reforms. He says the government will review the feedback it received during a 75-day consultation period and will respond with changes to meets a goal of making sure the tax system is fair and encourages investment. The proposals have faced a flurry of complaints from tech entrepreneurs, to doctors, to tax professionals, to provincial leaders, to backbench Liberal MPs.———EX-PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON IN MONTREAL TODAYFormer U.S. president Bill Clinton continues his visit to Canada today with a stop in Montreal. He will take part in a conversation with former prime minister Jean Chretien on the state of the Canada-U.S. relationship sponsored by the Canadian American Business Council. Clinton was in Toronto on Tuesday night where he accepted an honorary doctorate from Nova Scotia’s St. Francis Xavier University.———ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:— Trial continues in Ottawa for Basil Borutski, charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of three women in 2015.— Criminal trial in Ottawa of Ali Omar Ader, charged in kidnapping of journalist Amanda Lindhout.— Sears Canada appears in a Toronto court to seek an extension for creditor protection and permission to close 11 more stores.— Alberta Justice Minister Kathleen Ganley is scheduled to release a draft plan on how the province plans to deal with legal marijuana.— The Manitoba legislature will reconvene following the summer break.— Nova Scotia Auditor General Michael Pickup holds a news conference to discuss his financial audit work.— Acadia University will raise the Grand Council Flag of the Mi’kmaq Nation where it will fly permanently above University Hall.— Sophie Gregoire Trudeau takes part in a discussion in Ottawa on gender inequality.— An Alberta couple who won the Sept. 22 $60-million LottoMax jackpot will be introduced to the public.last_img read more

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Deputy SecretaryGeneral hails European Unions efforts to promote peace development

In a speech to the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, Ms. Migiro hailed the EU for bringing “the admirable solidarity of its citizens with the plight of the world’s poor and with the agenda of the United Nations.“You bring resources, creativity, innovation and the inspiring example of a continent that has proved to the world that peace, stability and human security can be achieved through cross-border cooperation,” she said.Speaking ahead of tomorrow’s launch in Brussels of the first-ever comprehensive report on UN-EU cooperation, Ms. Migiro noted that the two organizations share common values, such as respects for fundamental rights for freedom, as well as a shared commitment towards attaining the anti-poverty targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).“I welcome the fact that more than 60 per cent of the [European] Commission’s cooperation with the United Nations pertains to Africa, which is home to some of the most complex developmental, environmental and humanitarian challenges of our day,” she added.Ms. Migiro said the UN and EU had worked together to achieve success on promoting governance and democratization, fighting illegal trafficking of drugs and people, fostering better education and improving health care around the world.She also pointed to the support given to economic development in fragile industries in poorer nations, and to the joint help provided in the wake of emergencies such as the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. 14 March 2007The United Nations and the European Union (EU) “are engaged in a vital, tremendously complementary partnership,” particularly in helping the world’s poorest countries boost their social and economic development and providing urgent relief following natural disasters and other emergencies, Deputy Secretary-General Asha-Rose Migiro today. read more

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SecretaryGeneral heads to Bucharest for international meeting on Afghanistan

Also attending Thursday’s meeting will be Afghan President Hamid Karzai, newly-appointed UN envoy Kai Eide and key international stakeholders, including high-level representatives of the member countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).Non-NATO contributing nations of the UN-mandated International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), as well as representatives of key international organizations, such as the European Union and the World Bank, will also be participating in the meeting, which is part of the three-day NATO Summit that will begin in Bucharest tomorrow. Upon his arrival in the Romanian capital tomorrow, Mr. Ban will conduct bilateral meetings with some of the leaders attending the Summit. He will also meet with the President and Prime Minister of Romania while he is in the country.The Security Council recently renewed the mandate of the UN political mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) – which is headed by Mr. Eide – and widened its scope to include leading international civilian efforts to provide political outreach, support reconciliation programmes and strengthen cooperation with ISAF. 1 April 2008Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will be travelling to the Romanian capital, Bucharest, where, on Thursday, he will be joining other world leaders at an international meeting focusing on peace and development efforts in strife-torn Afghanistan. read more

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Philippines massacre must spur reform say UN rights experts

2 December 2009The recent killing of 57 people in the southern Philippines, including some 30 journalists, must be seen as a watershed moment for the country, two independent United Nations human rights experts said today, stressing the need to bring the perpetrators to justice and take measures to prevent such crimes in the future. “The pre-meditated killing of political opponents, combined with a massive assault on the media, must be tackled at various levels that go well beyond standard murder investigations,” Philip Alston, the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial executions, and Frank La Rue, the Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, stated in a news release.The 23 November attack on a convoy in the province of Minguindanao, which took place in the context of a local election campaign, was condemned by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and the head of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Irina Bokova.Calling the killings “a tragedy of the first order,” the two experts said the first step is to ensure that the police investigation is “comprehensive and independent,” and that must be followed by effective prosecutions of all those responsible for the killings. At the same time, they added that “the massacre also demanded a more extensive reflection on the elite family-dominated manipulation of the political processes and the need to eliminate such practices” to ensure the future of democracy in the Philippines. “This will require a thorough-going investigation of the broader context to be undertaken by a credible and independent body, appointed with full legal powers to carry out an effective inquiry and make recommendations.” The experts voiced their dismay at what they described as “the wholesale killings of journalists” and emphasized that any broader inquiry into the political system would need to focus on the ways and means of enhancing protection for journalists in the future. Noting that “elections in the Philippines have traditionally become occasions for widespread extrajudicial executions of political opponents,” they also called on the Government to immediately set up a high-level task force to identify measures to prevent killings that occur in the lead-up to elections. read more

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Bosnia and Herzegovina Security Council hears of political stagnation

15 November 2011Bosnia and Herzegovina continues to stagnate politically mainly because of politicians’ reluctance to compromise and engage in dialogue, as well as their tendency to abuse the system, even as State institutions face functional and economic pressure that has undermined their efficiency, the Security Council heard today. Briefing the Council, the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Valentin Inzko, said that Republika Srpska – one of two semi-autonomous entities that make up the country – has continued to engage in legal and political actions and sharp rhetoric challenging State institutions, competences and laws, and his authority under the Dayton peace agreement and the Council’s relevant resolutions.“Two leading BiH [Bosnia and Herzegovina] Croat parties continue to question the legality and the legitimacy of the incumbent Federation Government. Some Bosniak political leaders escalated their rhetoric in response to statements from the RS [Republika Srpska] leadership and warned of possible conflict, were there an attempt to divide the country.“I have long warned about the serious damage this rhetoric is doing and I again use this opportunity to call on Bosnia and Herzegovina’s leaders to contribute to fostering reconciliation, dialogue and co-existence rather than spreading chauvinism, fear and mistrust,” Mr. Inzko told the Council.He said there was need for his office to remain in Bosnia and Herzegovina to fill the legal gaps in the country and maintain stability. “This need will continue until such time as Bosnian and Herzegovina is self-sustainable and firmly and irreversibly on the path towards EU [European Union] and NATO integration.”Mr. Inzko also pointed out that given the negative trends and political instability, it is essential that the European Union Force (EUFOR) remains in place to continue to assist the Office of the High Representative and other international organizations to fulfil their respective mandates.He urged the international community not to give up on Bosnia and Herzegovina, stressing that disengagement was likely to lead to renewed disorder.“The international community has achieved tremendous results in Bosnia and Herzegovina over the past 15 years, [but] it is clear from the current political situation that we have not yet achieved a lasting and sustainable political settlement that would ensure a durable prospect for peace.“Our continued commitment to and focus on Bosnia and Herzegovina is the only way to get to achieve that we all want to reach – a Bosnia and Herzegovina that is stable, safe and solving its problems institutionally as it moves towards full Euro-Atlantic integration,” Mr. Inzko added.Representatives of the Council’s 15 Member States, including Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Serbia and Croatia and the head of the European Union delegation to the United Nations were due to address the Council debate. read more

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Report raises concern over human rights in Cuba UN spokesman

“French judge Christine Chanet, notes with concern that her calls for clemency in these cases have gone unheard,” Fred Eckhard told the press in New York. “In addition, she is critical of the April 2003 execution of three people accused of hijacking a ferry in spite of Cuba’s moratorium on the use of the death penalty.”Ms. Chanet calls on the Cuban Government to stop depriving the population of its basic rights and freedoms and appeals for a number of measures to be taken in this regard.The report, which will be submitted to the next session of the UN Human Rights Commission, also provides broad context for its analysis, noting “positive aspects” of the realization of economic, social and cultural rights in Cuba, especially in the areas of health and education. read more

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Sierra Leone cholera outbreak spreading UN health agency says

In a press briefing in Geneva, Glenn Thomas, a spokesperson for the World Health Organization (WHO), confirmed the spread of cholera to an additional two districts of the West African country, noting that since the beginning of 2012, there had been 11,189 reported cases and 203 deaths due to the outbreak. Mr. Thomas told reporters that the WHO was supporting the Government of Sierra Leone in the areas of epidemiology and social mobilization and had sent three cholera experts form its regional office to respond to the deteriorating crisis. Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by eating food or drinking water contaminated with the bacterium known as vibrio cholerae. The disease has a short incubation period and produces a toxin that causes continuous watery diarrhoea, a condition that can quickly lead to severe dehydration and death if treatment is not administered promptly. Vomiting also occurs in most patients.In his briefing, Mr. Thomas also provided an update on the outbreak of Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where a total of 15 cases of viral contamination, including nine deaths, have been reported. He said that the WHO was supporting the DRC Ministry of Health in conducting a series of epidemiological investigations as well as surveillance, public information and social mobilization initiatives. Ebola is transmitted by direct contact with the blood, secretions, other bodily fluids or organs of infected persons or animals such as chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys and antelopes, and it has an incubation period of two to 21 days. Sufferers can experience fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headaches and a sore throat, as well as vomiting, diarrhoea, rashes and impaired kidney and liver function. In the most severe cases, the virus leads to both external and internal bleeding. The most recent outbreak happened last month in Uganda with a total of 20 cases, including 14 deaths, reported across the western part of the country. In its briefing, the WHO added that it did not recommend that any travel or trade restrictions be applied to the DRC because of the outbreak. read more

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Ban urges annual Munich security summit to back UN efforts in Syria

In a wide-ranging address to the 50th annual Munich Security Conference, the Secretary-General described the current state of international affairs as grappling with profound demographic, social and environmental change – and enormous shifts in political and commercial power. Moreover, while many countries have achieved stability and progress, many others lack the capacity or the will to meet the expectations of their citizens for freedoms and basic services.“The United Nations is rising to these challenges through diplomacy and dialogue, peacekeeping and peace-building… and earlier action on violations of human rights,” the Secretary-General said, adding the UN family grasps more keenly than ever that peace and development go hand in hand.“At the same time, I see places where we are falling dangerously short, at a tremendous cost in lives and credibility,” he said, urging the gathered leaders to work with the United Nations as it seeks to bring stability an ease suffering in South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and especially in Syria, which he declared “the most urgent security crisis in the world today”. “Deeply immersed” in addressing the conflict in Syria, where a devastating there-year civil war “is destroying a nation and engulfing the entire region,” the UN chief underscored that the situation highlights the conundrum the international community faces when there is a compelling need to protect people from grave human rights violations, but there are severe divisions among the main actors: within Syria, among its neighbours, and in the UN Security Council. While he welcomed the show of support regarding the liquidation of Syria’s chemical weapons stockpiles after witnessing the “horror” of a chemical attack last year, Mr. Ban stressed that the vast majority of the killing is being carried out with conventional weapons. “That is why we have put so much energy into getting the Government and the opposition to the negotiating table in Geneva,” he said, noting that the first round of talks ended yesterday, and that Joint Special Representative of the United Nations and the League of Arab States, Lakhdar Brahimi, has invited the parties to return to Geneva on February 10th. The Secretary-General said that he and Mr. Brahimi discussed the talks last night with United States Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, co-conveners of the UN-sponsored discussions in Geneva and “I urged them to use their influence to ensure the talks proceed as planned.” Acknowledging that experience with other conflicts suggests that progress will be difficult, Mr. Ban said: “It is hard going, but we have made a start. The parties may still be fighting, but now they are also talking. This is the only hope for a political solution.” The negotiations must not be used as a tactic to delay the end of fighting, he added. “And every day, the humanitarian situation grows more catastrophic. I am particularly concerned about people trapped in besieged areas beyond the reach of aid,” said Mr. Ban calling on both sides – and the Government in particular – to allow the unfettered access required under international humanitarian law. He also commended Germany for opening its doors to many thousands of Syrian refugees, and strongly urged everyone with influence on the parties to push for progress in Geneva. The international community can be effective when it innovates, builds partnerships and acts decisively,” said the Secretary-General, citing joint work between the UN, Governments and regional entities like the African Union (AU) and the European Union (EU), to ensure peace and stability and promote reconciliation in, among others, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic, Mali and South Sudan. Mr. Ban met the Foreign Minister of Iran, Javad Zarif, on the margins of the Munich Security Conference. They discussed the situation in Syria, in particular the Geneva peace talks, and the Iranian nuclear programme. The UN chief welcomed the Minister’s assurances that Iran would play its part in the search for a political solution to the Syria conflict. At a press conference later in the day, Mr. Ban said he was “heartened” that the warring parties in Syria had finally exchanged views on how to resolve a crisis that has dragged on for three years, and which has killed “considerably more than 100,000 people, displaced millions.” “The fact that both parties observed a minute of silence for the victims provides a glimmer of hope that they can find common ground,” he said, reiterating that the process that began last week in Montreux and then Geneva will be slow, but it is an important step forward. He also noted that the Montreux high-level segment of the talks had featured interventions by those that support the Syrian Government and those countries that support the opposition, “so it was a…united [show of] solidarity by the international community to both parties, [while] urging them to resolve all pending issues through a political process. That is, establishing a transitional governing body with full executive powers upon mutual consent.” “I sincerely hope that the second round of negotiations will begin as planned on 10 February,” said the UN chief, noting that he had asked Secretary of State Kerry and Foreign Minister Lavrov to exercise their countries’ influence on the parties to resume negotiations “with greater seriousness and urgency.” Turning to other pressing matters, he told reporters that later today, he will attend a meeting of the diplomatic Quartet on the Middle East peace process. Mr. Ban said that as 2014 is a crucial year for that effort, the international community must do everything it can to support the current Israeli-Palestinian negotiations and move away from the “dangerous” status quo. The UN chief said that he also remains “seriously concerned” about developments in Ukraine, including allegations of human rights violations, “which is why I sent Robert Serry on a fact-finding mission to Kyiv this week.” Noting that Mr. Serry is currently his Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, Mr. Ban said the official was a former Dutch Ambassador to Ukraine. “He briefed me here in Munich on his meetings in Ukraine. He met the President, the Foreign Minister and opposition leaders,” said Mr. Ban, noting his own meetings yesterday in Munich with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Leonid Kozhara, and this morning, with Ukrainian opposition leaders, including Vitaly Klitschko. “I listened carefully to what the Minister and the opposition leaders had to say, and I impressed on them my growing concern about the standoff in the country. I urged the Government to take bold and decisive steps to de-escalate the situation,” said Mr. Ban, adding that he also urged both parties to show maximum restraint and greater flexibility in the search for a solution to this crisis and design a peaceful future for their country. The Ukrainian capital, Kiev, has been witnessing mass protests since late November, following a Government decision not to sign an agreement on broader integration with the European Union.The demonstrations flared up again last week in the wake of legislation passed on 16 January that restricted the exercise of fundamental rights, including the rights to freedom of association, assembly and expression, and the operation of non-governmental organizations, as well as imposed penalties, including prison sentences, for breaches. Just yesterday, the UN human rights office welcomed the start of dialogue between President Viktor Yanukovych and the opposition in Ukraine following weeks of violent unrest.“We call for this dialogue to be sustainable, inclusive and grounded on the full respect of international human rights treaties ratified by Ukraine,” the spokesperson for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Rupert Colville, told a news conference in Geneva. Among his other activities in Munich, the Secretary-General met with Irakli Garibashvili, Prime Minister of Georgia, whom he congratulated on his recent appointment and expressed his hope for continued strong cooperation between the Government of Georgia and the United Nations. The Secretary-General and the Prime Minister discussed the importance of the Geneva International Discussions as well as the need to address the humanitarian and developmental needs of the people on the ground throughout Georgia, and to enhance human rights, peace and security. Mr. Ban also invited the Georgian Government to participate at the highest level in the Climate Summit that he will host in New York on 23 September 2014. read more

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Croatia with 15 players to Rio – Cindric is the last one

Croatia handballHandball Rio 2016Rio 2o16 handballZeljko Babic handball Croatian national team coach Zeljko Babic announced 15 names for the Olympic Games in Rio! Croatia will travel to Brazil with 15 players, and the last one in reserve will be RK Vardar Skopje playmaker Luka Cindric.Goalkeepers:Ivan Stevanović – HC PPD ZagrebIvan Pešić – HC Meshkov BrestWings:Manuel Štrlek – HC Vive Tauron KielceIvan Čupić – HC Vive Tauron KielceZlatko Horvat – HC PPD ZagrebLine players:Ilija Brozović – THW KielKrešimir Kozina – HC FlensburgBack line:Marko Kopljar – HC BarcelonaLuka Stepančić – HC PPD ZagrebIgor Karačić – HC VardarMarko Mamić – HC DunkerqueIvan Slišković – HC VeszpremDomagoj Duvnjak – THW KielJakov Gojun – Fuchse BerlinReplacement:Luka CindrićPHOTO: CHF ← Previous Story Beciri to replace Blagotinsek at RK Celje Pivovarna Lasko Next Story → Slovenia without Marguc and SKube in Rio! read more

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NY Times to rebrand Herald Tribune in its own image

first_imgFOR A DECADE the International Herald Tribune has been the global edition of the New York Times in all but name. On Monday, the parent company made it official.In a statement, the New York Times Company said the 125-year-old offshoot of the defunct New York Herald Tribune will be rechristened sometime this fall as the International New York Times.“The digital revolution has turned the New York Times from being a great American newspaper to becoming one of the world’s best-known news providers,” said New York Times Company chief executive Mark Thompson.“We want to exploit that opportunity,” said the former BBC boss, adding that a new website for international readers is also in the pipeline.The International Herald Tribune (IHT) was co-owned by the New York Times and the Washington Post from 1967 until 2003, when the Times became its sole proprietor and restyled it as “the global edition of the New York Times.”It almost exclusively showcased New York Times content in a bid to appeal to high-earning anglophone globe-trotters in competition with global editions of the Wall Street Journal and Britain’s Financial Times.Prior to 1967 the IHT was known as the Paris edition of the New York Herald Tribune — immortalized in Jean-Luc Godard’s New Wave classic “Breathless” by Jean Seberg in a tight yellow T-shirt hawking copies on the Champs-Elysees.The New York Times published an international edition under its own name from 1946 until it bought into “the Trib” and helped oversee its development as a global media brand through the use of satellite printing plants.News of the rebranding came less than three weeks after the New York Times Company posted a 2012 group profit of $133 million, compared with a loss of $39.7 million in 2011.It gave no breakdown of profit or loss figures for its newspapers, but earlier this month it said it was putting the Boston Globe and other New England assets up for sale to focus on its eponymous core product.Monday’s announcement made no reference to layoffs — half of the IHT staff are in France, where labor costs are higher — but it stated the International New York Times “will be edited from Hong Kong, Paris, London and New York.”It also spoke vaguely of investments “in print, web and mobile platforms” as well as plans “to add more voices in news and opinion.”“The New York Times and its international edition, the IHT, have always been known for accurate and authoritative journalism that helps to set the agenda for global conversations and debate,” said New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Junior, whose family holds ultimate control of the company.“A logical next step for us as we seek to extend our international reach is to bring these two great newspapers even closer together,” he said.“As we do, we will be sure to nurture and preserve those unique qualities of the IHT that are so highly prized by its current readers.”- © AFP, 2013last_img read more

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Who needs gas when we can use algae to fuel our cars

first_imgWith gas prices rising to an estimated $5 per gallon this summer, it may be time to take another look at using alternative means of fuel. We all know that we could use corn to create ethanol, but how about using algae as an alternative energy source?In the video below from PBS we see algae fuel being used as an alternative to fossil fuel, which is not only costly, but is also bad for the environment. So where do we get enough algae to replace the 18 million barrels we’re using a day? It’s not like it grows on trees or anything… wait, it kind of does.The thing is, farming algae from its natural surroundings isn’t really feasible for the large scale needed to replace regular petroleum gas. That’s where algae farms come in. According to Mike Mendez, the vice president in technology at Sapphire Energy, the algae plant featured on the PBS video, fossilized algae was actually an ingredient that used to be used in crude oil.Sapphire Energy actually grows its algae not in a swampy, wet location, but in New Mexico, where there’s a ton of sunlight and a bounty of salt water under the ground. Since the salt water can’t be used to drink, or for crops, New Mexico is an ideal place to use natural resources to create this alternative fuel.Using photosynthesis, and long process of cultivating the algae in ponds and then sending them to plants to extract the oil from the algae cells, a lovely-looking green crude is produced, and there you have your new fuel.With any new form of energy, it’s always going to be more expensive than the current form initially. Installing solar panels is pricey and using biodiesel can also set you back, but the idea is that the costs will pay off in the future. In terms of the algae biofuel and regular oil, a barrel of oil costs $3.50 a gallon, whereas the algae biofuel costs $7 a gallon. Clearly, the technology hasn’t reached a point where it’s cost effective yet, but it’s on its way. Sapphire says its 75 percent confident that in the next five years the price will get down to $80 a barrel, which is even less than the cost of oil.To get this ball rolling, Sapphire is opening a new 300-acre test plant next year, which will be the largest in the U.S. The plant will produce 1 million gallons per year, which should hopefully help the price drop.Watch the full episode. See more Nightly Business Report.Via PBSlast_img read more

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What causes GSM buzz

first_imgYou might not hear it much anymore, but the dreaded GSM buzz was a common annoyance a few years ago. Hold a GSM phone transmitting any kind of signal anywhere near a speaker, and suddenly the most unpleasant buzzing would start distorting your audio. This is a consequence of the way GSM works, but have you ever wondered why it works like this?Before super-fast HSPA connections arrived on GSM phones, there was TDMA-based 2G EDGE. TDMA stands for time-division multiple access, and it’s the key to the distinctive GSM buzz. When your mobile device is talking to a cell tower, it’s not doing so on its own. There are probably dozens of other phones pinging the tower at that exact same moment. Since a limited number of phones can operate on a single frequency, TDMA informs the way devices take turns transmitting data.All the action takes place in a TDMA frame, which is 0.004615 seconds long. So every 0.004615 seconds your phone gets its chance to transmit. Can you guess what else happens every 0.004615 seconds? Yep, the electronic interference that causes the GSM buzz happens in the same pattern.The frequencies that GSM runs on also play into this situation. The audio amplifiers are being hit with bursts of electromagnetic energy from the phone because the wiring and circuitry acts as an antenna. Even headphone cables can be susceptible. The signal causes a small voltage spike that is translated into sound — that’s what a speaker does, after all.Newer varieties of GSM technology are based on WCDMA technology and aren’t time-divided. Combine that with the prevalence of different frequencies and the GSM buzz is much less common these days. Still, you might hear it if your GSM phone steps down to 2G service. It’s the sound of nostalgia.via Windytanlast_img read more

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Dengue lépidémie pourrait arriver en métropole

first_imgDengue : l’épidémie pourrait arriver en métropoleFrance – L’Institut de veille sanitaire (InVS) a déclaré dans son bulletin du 25 juillet que la population de moustiques tigres (Aedes albopictus) se développe dans l’Hexagone, laissant craindre une propagation du virus de la dengue sur le territoire métropolitain.Aedes albopictus, c’est le nom latin de ce petit insecte qui effraie tant les épidémiologistes. Et pour cause : ce moustique, lointain cousin de celui de nos contrées, est le vecteur de transmission des arbovirus comme la dengue et le chikungunya. Aucun cas d’infection n’a pour l’instant été recensé dans la métropole, mais la présence de patients infectés lors de voyages dans des zones tropicales -l’épidémie fait rage en Guadeloupe et en Martinique- laisse craindre une transplantation de l’épidémie en France. En effet, si un moustique tigre pique une personne infectée, il peut ensuite transmettre le virus à un individu sain en le piquant. D’où l’importance des campagnes de démoustication, notamment dans les Alpes de Haute-Provence, où Aedes albopictus a été repéré.Le 5 août 2010 à 10:31 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Espérance de vie les révélations dune poignée de main

first_imgEspérance de vie : les révélations d’une poignée de main Le dynamisme peut, chez les personnes âgées, donner des indications quant à la durée de vie. Ainsi, la force d’une simple poignée de main pourrait être riche d’enseignements. Le docteur Rachel Cooper et son équipe du Medical Research Council ont publié les résultats d’une étude surprenante dans le British Medical Journal. Ils ont croisé les résultats de trente-trois études menées sur 50.000 personnes, sur une période d’une quarantaine d’années au total. Toutes se sont intéressées aux comportements susceptibles d’être des indicateurs de l’espérance de vie. On peut notamment citer la façon de marcher, de se lever d’une chaise, de bouger sa jambe ou encore de serrer une main. Ainsi par exemple, les personnes qui ont une poignée de main molle ont une mortalité 67% supérieure à celles qui serrent des mains énergiquement. Il n’y a pas encore de véritable outil que l’on peut utiliser pour évaluer, à partir de ces données, une date approximative de décès. Néanmoins, dans la vie de tous les jours, cela peut renseigner sur la santé d’une personne âgée. Le 14 septembre 2010 à 12:07 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Galaxy expands its JapanMacau Integrated Resort Management Mentorship Scheme

first_img RelatedPosts Osaka approves Yumeshima site for commercial development in latest IR move Load More Galaxy Entertainment Group (GEG) is set to expand its GEG Japan-Macau Integrated Resort Management Mentorship Scheme, with a new three-week program commencing on 26 August.Operated in conjunction with the company’s non-profit Galaxy Entertainment Group Foundation, the GEG Mentorship Scheme aims to develop operational skills and sector knowledge for personnel interested in playing a role in the IR field and the broader Japanese hospitality industry. Galaxy launched the program last year in collaboration with Japan’s Toyo University. This year’s program will incorporate lectures conducted by faculty members from the University of Macau as well as an in-depth and diverse study of IR operations hosted at Galaxy Macau. Subjects covered will include food and beverage management, hotel management, entertainment, retail services, event management, marketing and corporate social responsibilities, GEG said.“GEG believes in the importance of providing practical opportunities for students from Japan to learn about the integrated resort industry,” said GEG Vice Chairman Francis Lui.“Supporting local talent development is a key element in the sustainable and responsible development of IRs in Japan. This is in line with our practices in Macau and Hong Kong, where we have been providing young people with various opportunities to explore their career paths. We intend to sustain our contribution to Japanese society by continuing to support the younger generation, especially those interested in developing a career in the IR and hospitality industry.”GEG said it intends to further expand with the cooperation of both Japanese and Macanese academic and commercial institutions in 2020 and beyond, including parallel opportunities for young people from Macau to benefit from similar learning experiences in Japan. Huawei Japan joins Kansai Economic Federation with eye on World Expo 2025 and Osaka IR Japan to conduct nationwide prefectural survey to confirm IR intentionslast_img read more

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Sensing a Void in the Marketplace NewBeauty Readies to Seize an Opportunity

first_imgFolio: Going forward, is it a priority to drive more revenue directly from consumers?Chapski: It’s about diversification, but it does feel good to have a healthy circulation and to put a product out there that people are paying for. We do really well on the newsstand, especially with retailers like Hudson News and Barnes & Noble. So I think there are a lot of clever and different things we can do there. There’s more to come on that.Folio: NewBeauty has always partially differentiated itself through its coverage of cosmetic procedures in addition to traditional beauty. Is that something you intend to lean into further?Chapski: I wouldn’t say lean into so much as making sure it’s as credible as possible. If you think about beauty, those two worlds have historically been very compartmentalized. You had consumers who were heavily engaged in the cosmetic enhancement world, and then you had the more traditional beauty person who thinks of makeup and fragrance.Those two worlds have collided. It’s all one space now. As Emily evolves the brand, I think that’s one more thing you’re going to see. Beauty is a holistic experience for women and it shouldn’t feel shameful or diminishing. There’s an empowerment and confidence piece that plays into all of that. So it’s important to us to be able to tell women about what’s going on there.Folio: What broader trends are you paying attention to in the beauty space moving forward?Chapski: We want to be ahead of all of it. If a woman is turning to us to understand things, they expect to see it here. Discovery is a very big piece of what we are, no matter what we’re covering. It’s trends and styles, but it’s also health. We cover it from the full spectrum. We educate our consumers so they can make informed choices about their lifestyles and their beauty.A lot of magazines are veering away from that. They’re consolidating their expertise into homogenized departments. That’s what’s happening around us, but that’s not what’s happening here. It’s a great place to be. Over an eight-year run as publisher and chief revenue officer at Allure, Agnes Chapski made a name for herself by growing the brand from a mass-market beauty magazine to a diversified business, replete with a multi-million dollar portfolio of ancillary revenue lines and brand extensions that generate Condé Nast millions in revenue each year. But success (and accolades) aside, she readily admits that a considerably smaller title had always occupied a secret place of envy: NewBeauty, the weighty quarterly digest of all things beauty launched by Adam Sandow in 2005.“When NewBeauty first came out, it hit something that no one else was doing,” Chapski tells Folio:. “Every time Adam started a new business line, like the TestTube subscription boxes, we said to ourselves, ‘Wow, that is the smartest thing ever.’ This was way before Birchbox existed. No one was doing that kind of stuff in the publishing space.”It was partially Sandow’s own spirit of entrepreneurship that Chapski says drew her to her latest gig this past September: president of NewBeauty and Beauty Engine, Sandow’s newly formed marketing services shop.In the new job at a new company, Chapski is tasked with further expanding NewBeauty beyond its near-ubiquity on newsstands across the country, building on the brand’s 13-year foundation and creating new revenue streams in print, online, and beyond.Folio: sat down with Chapski to learn a little bit more about her plans for the brand going forward and the nuances that come with running a mass-market magazine in 2018.Agnes ChapskiFolio: Your mandate when you arrived was to grow the business. Would you say your main priority in that mission is creating new business lines?Agnes Chapski: That’s one thing. Brands need to evolve and I really feel this brand has an amazing foundation that needs to be lifted up. It needs more visibility and it needs to be elevated. We want to reimagine what everything around NewBeauty is, from the magazine and our digital platforms, to our sampling business and our awards and credentialing. We are the beauty authority—that’s our tagline—and we need to own that in a way that is legitimate and authentic, making sure that everything we do is done through that lens.The other thing is that NewBeauty fills a void that’s currently being ignored. There’s so much emphasis on chasing Gen-Z and Millennials. There is a mass segment of Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers and women in their 30s or 40s or 50s that is completely being ignored from a media perspective. NewBeauty speaks to that consumer, so we see a phenomenal opportunity, particularly since these women are the ones who have the money to spend.So filling that space in a meaningful way is really important to us, and that’s one of the main reasons we brought on [former Elle beauty director] Emily Dougherty, our new editor-in-chief. She lives and breathes beauty like no one I’ve ever come in contact with. We know our women are affluent and sophisticated and inquisitive, so we want to make sure that we represent that.Folio: What do you mean by creating better visibility for the brand? Chapski: It has been a smaller brand, and we think there’s huge potential to grow our audience but stay very core to who we are. A really important part of that visibility, and also our credibility, is our awards. In our May issue, we’ve unveiled all of our award-winning products. There are over 140 of them, and the awards are very much a reflection of NewBeauty. We’re elevating and sophisticating that brand and all of the assets around it, so the feel of it has been redesigned and we’re doing a lot to push that out and raise consumer awareness.We want consumers to discover new products, but they have to have efficacy and solve a woman’s problem. We’ve vetted these products, and we have a very different way that we go out to market with our credentialing. There has to be authenticity to it.Folio: You mentioned this segment of Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers who are being ignored by marketers. Why do you think that void exists?Chapski: It’s a complicated question. I do think a lot of marketers are confused and that they get caught up chasing things. As a brand, you always have to be adding new consumers, but you also have to be really focused on protecting your core consumer.Folio: To that point, if you look at the newsstand, a lot of mass-market magazines are getting thinner, particularly those in the beauty and women’s lifestyle space.Chapski: And not just thinner, look at their trim sizes. It’s alarming. And they’re cutting back issues. We’ve always been a quarterly, and we are robust. We charge our consumer $10 to buy us, and she expects a robust experience if she’s spending that kind of money. The circulation departments at Sandow make money. If you’re a marketer, don’t you want to know that the consumer sees value in a media brand?Print is not dead. Marketers abandoned print, not consumers. If you look at the successful print brands that are out there, they’re very focused on passion points. Travel is doing very well. Food is doing well. And those brands are charging the consumer for it.Folio: Has that quality over quantity approach enabled NewBeauty to resist the challenges we’re seeing in the marketplace?Chapski: I do think that’s part of it. It’s about how you make your money. We’re not beholden to having to charge a dollar an issue just so we can capture ad dollars. Of course I want advertising. I think these brands do very well when they come and advertise with NewBeauty, but we aren’t beholden to just advertising.I think what makes us healthier and more resistant to fluctuations that occur in the marketplace is the fact that we’ve diversified. Even online, we just hit an all-time high in January of 1.1 million uniques. That’s pretty big for a niche brand. We have lots of plans to grow that too, but we have to stay true to our mission and our consumer. We don’t invest in tons of SEO or anything like that; these people are coming to us organically.Folio: What can you tell us about Beauty Engine?Chapski: That’s another big part of this. In very simple terms, it’s going to be a full-service beauty solutions company. We’ve got all of these different ways we can help the brands and partners we work with to amplify their businesses. We will be able to help brands in a really new and different way from just coming and advertising with us.Folio: You’ve said that brands need true solution partners, rather than just media partners. Was that the idea behind setting this up as its own sort of company, rather than doing these types of things at the brand level?Chapski: It’s a matter of taking the things that we already do and blowing them out in a bigger way with a singular focus. We have different partners for [product-focused SIP] Beauty Report than we do for NewBeauty. Some are the same. Some intersect with just TestTube. We want to have options for all of our partners.We can help someone like a Procter & Gamble, but we can also speak to an indie brand that’s maybe only two years old. We don’t want to just speak to one segmentation of the beauty market.Folio: What about the TestTube subscription boxes?Chapski: We’re doing a full redesign of the TestTube, in that same vein of elevating it. It’s interesting because other models of these subscription boxes have all very much been beholden to building scale in order to make them profitable, and they become sort of homogenized, and I think it compromises the offerings.Our box is meant to be a quality experience; we only take luxury or full-sized products, and the consumer pays a hefty price. It’s $29.99 per Tube, for a six-times-a-year subscription, whereas elsewhere in the marketplace you’ll typically see $10 or $15. We think there’s a different kind of space that’s being missed and we’re filling that void.last_img read more

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BSE closes points 10783 up on October 31

first_imgNew Delhi, October 31 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 107.83 points up to stand at 21141.80. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 47.45 points up to stand at 6,299.15. Bank of India and Oriental Bank were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 21.26 % and 18.01% along with Allahabad Bank and Indian Bank with an increase of 13.34% and 13.33% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include Suzlon Energy and Prestige Estates with a decrease of 4.90% and 3.82% along with Wockhardt and Sobha Dev with a decrease of 3.72% and 3.51% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 3.60 points at 12,074.90 while the banking sector is up 248.13 points at 13,086.92 and the realty sector is up 9.54 points at 1,343.47. The Indian currency is down 0.29% at Rs 61.41 per dollar.last_img read more

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WWF Says Wildlife Populations Have Declined by 58 Since 1970

first_img The current human population on Earth is somewhere in the neighborhood of 7.2 billion. That’s a lot of anything to have walking around the planet, but our impact is greatly increased by the industrialized society most humans exist in. A new report from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) illustrates the scale of human impact. It says vertebrate wildlife populations have declined by 58% since 1970.The WWF cites the “Living Planet‘ report as clear evidence that humanity needs to get serious about conservation. Based on the current data, Living Planet projects that the loss in wildlife population could reach two-thirds of 1970 levels by the year 2020. We have a good understanding of what humans are doing to cause this massive die-off, but fixing it is a lot more complicated.Everyone agrees that some factors like poaching and overfishing should be stopped, but climate change is a big part of this too. There’s no consensus on how to address that, and some people have yet to even accept it as a reality. Increasing rates of pollution and exploitation of fresh water sources are also having negative impacts on animal populations.The analysis was conducted by gathering data from conservation groups and NGOs. Any animal with at least two data points going back to 1970 was included in the study. Researchers had to weight the data based on how extensively an animal has been studied. For example, there’s a lot of data on wildlife in the Arctic as scientists zero in on climate change, but relatively little on tropical species. The corrected numbers show that freshwater animals have fared particularly bad with 81% population loss since 1970.Not everyone is convinced by the survey’s conclusions, though. Some in the scientific community think it’s irresponsible to try and condense all the data down into a single number. A total of 3,700 species were analyzed for the report — certainly not very many in the grand scheme of things. Still, even critics admit that many of the individual numbers cited in the Living Planet analysis are troubling. Stay on target Alligators Spotted ‘Swimming’ in Road, Climbing Fences in FloridaLightning Strike Kills 300-Pound Bear in Colorado last_img read more

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A New Reflection in the Mirror

first_imgA scanning electron microscope image of some of the magnetic mirror´s “fish scale”-shaped aluminum nanowires. Credit: Alexander Schwanecke Citation: A New Reflection in the Mirror (2007, January 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-01-mirror.html The nanowire layer is the key to the mirror’s function. The curved nanowire “fish scales,” like molecules, have dimensions that are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. This means that they can interact with the light to influence or directly produce the material’s overall optical response, in this case, a reversal of the light’s magnetic field.The researchers discovered the mirror’s ability by observing a reflection using an interferometer, a device that can detect the difference in behavior of two light waves by recording what happens when they “interfere,” or cross paths.“One characteristic of our mirror is that it is very sensitive to energy losses at the surface,” said Schwanecke. “This property could make it very useful for improving devices that work by detecting light, such as photodetectors.”The mirror could also be useful, he says, in the detection of tiny particles or molecules near the mirror’s surface. If a particle or molecule was nearby and emitted a photon, the mirror would reflect the photon’s electric component without reversing it. A “normal” mirror would reverse it, thus weakening the signal and making it harder to detect the photon and, by extension, the particle or molecule.The mirror’s potential to work with near-infrared light (light close to the visible range but still in the infrared) could make it advantageous to the telecommunications industry, in which near-infrared light is commonly used.Citation: A.S. Schwanecke, V.A. Fedotov, V.V. Khardikov, S.I. Prosvirnin, Y. Chen, and N.I. Zheludev, “Optical magnetic mirrors.” J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 9 (2007) L1-L2By Laura Mgrdichian, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. A research group has devised a new type of mirror that reverses the magnetic field of a light wave upon reflection, rather than its electric field, as regular mirrors do. Seems like a minor difference? It’s not. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img MEMS-in-the-lens architecture for laser scanning microscopy “Our mirror’s ability to reverse the magnetic field of a light wave but not its electric field is extremely unusual,” physicist Alexander Schwanecke, the study’s corresponding scientist, said to PhysOrg.com. Schwanecke is a researcher at the NanoPhotonics Portfolio Centre at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom. “It is the first demonstration of an entirely new type of optical tool.”A typical household mirror works like this: Photons (particles of light) bounce off an object or person, hit the mirror, and are absorbed by electrons on the surface of its metal backing. The electrons almost instantly emit “reflected” photons (not the same photons that came in, as those are absorbed and gone), which travel to our eyes, allowing us to see our image. Photons that strike the mirror head-on are reflected squarely back, and those hitting at an angle are reflected at the same angle in the other direction, forming a V-shaped path. This is the law of reflection.To understand the work by Schwanecke and his colleagues, however, we must remember that light is both a particle and a wave, and that, as a wave, it consists of an electric-field component and a magnetic-field component. After a reflection, the direction of the emitted light wave’s electric field is reversed (this is one type of a “phase change”) but the magnetic component is not.This magnetic mirror produces the opposite scenario: a flipped magnetic field and an unchanged electric field. The mirror has three layers: a layer of aluminum, a layer of silicon dioxide, and finally a layer of carefully arranged aluminum nanowires, shaped into a wavy pattern that the researchers call “fish scales.” The fish-scale shape is important because it allows the light to interact with the nanowires in a particular way, due to the spacing between each “scale.” As a result, the scales resonate with the light much like molecules would. The mirror is tiny and square, about 500 micrometers (millionths of a meter) on each side, and contains about one million fish-scale-shaped elements. It works best for visible light, but the group expects that, with some tweaks to the fish-scale pattern, near-infrared light would work, too. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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