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Fritz, Ritch win 2020 USG election

first_imgThe Truman & Rose ticket received 1,522 votes — 32% of total voter turnout — while the Sara & Rohit ticket received 1,427 votes, the Christopher & Trinity ticket received 847 votes, and the Christine & Miles ticket received 812 votes. More than 4,700 votes were cast this year, with 142 students abstaining.  Fritz said the USG executive team focused on unity throughout the organization this year, which improved the relationships between candidates for this election cycle, a departure from the tensions from last year. The USG 2020-21 Senate will comprise Isabel Washington, Dario Arganese, Trinity Moore, Alexis Areias, Mayra Rodriguez, Max Gomez, Lennon Wesley III, Ruben Romeo, Kevin Gutierrez, Cathy Ding, Gabriel Savage and Julian Lin.  The Truman & Rose ticket won the 2020 USG presidential election with 32% of the total voter turnout, comprising 1,522 votes, and beat out three other tickets. (Emily Sagen | Daily Trojan) “One of the things that we implemented this year that I advocated for was the voluntary well-being pact, which I think actually did help … being able to have a work-life balance,” Fritz said. Fritz, a junior majoring in business administration, currently serves as the USG senior director of communications. Ritch, a junior majoring in law, history and culture and sociology, is currently a senator. Fritz and Ritch emphasized student well-being, inclusion, administrative accountability and sustainability in their presidential campaign. They cited the lack of student representation in administrative circles as a cause of some of the problems on campus in recent years. The 2019 election cycle became contentious in its final weeks and generated political tension between candidates, Fritz said. According to a previous Daily Trojan article, last year’s presidential candidates Meagan Lane and Michaela Murphy believed the write-in campaigns — including winning candidates Trenton Stone and Mahin Tahsin — violated Elections Code because their names were provided on the ballot despite being write-in candidates. “We had a phenomenal team — we could not have been more grateful [for them],” Ritch said. “It took a village sort of effort for this, absolutely.” Truman Fritz and Rose Ritch will serve as Undergraduate Student Government’s 2020-21 president and vice president after defeating three other tickets in the race, Director of Elections and Recruitment Vaanyasri Goel announced Tuesday.  “Last year was really political,” Fritz said. “And we didn’t want to see that same process play out in this election cycle or in future election cycles.”  “I think my big thing is getting a student on the Board of Trustees because that’s really the key to unlocking everything else we can achieve in USG,” McMorran said.center_img The 2019 election saw a similar turnout of more than 4,000 voters, though only three presidential tickets were open compared to four. The amount of abstaining students almost halved since last year. Candidates Christopher McMorran and Trinity Lee included a similar emphasis on accountability in their platform. According to McMorran, USG requires final approval from the Board of Trustees to enact its legislative resolutions but believes the lack of student representation within the governing body hinders important progress.  “I would really encourage [Fritz and Ritch] to get down on the ground [and] be at student events, go to student organizations and be really visible,” McMorran said.  Along with election results, Goel also discussed unofficial voter turnout numbers and the winners of the senatorial election at the USG meeting.  According to Fritz, the election process requires a significant time commitment — with candidates orchestrating their campaign in December — and constant engagement with the campaign. The time-consuming process took away from the personal lives of the candidates and their campaign teams, Fritz said. Ritch said this presidential election process became one of her most demanding yet important experiences in her time at USC, which required countless late nights and meetings with nearly 70 student organizations within four weeks. Fritz and Ritch commended their campaign team for its invaluable contributions to their presidential campaign through social media promotion and on-the-ground campaigning on Trousdale. CORRECTION: A previous version of this article miswrote Alexis Areias’ name. It has since been updated with the correct spelling. The Daily Trojan regrets this error. McMorran advised the incoming president and vice president to increase USG involvement with student groups on campus.  “Administrators do not have a student-first mindset,” Fritz said. “And we want to not only establish advisory councils … to bring students at large directly into the conversations and have them advise on [University policy making] decisions, but also, we want to be able to establish a better connection between USG [and the] student body.”last_img read more

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Mandela’s legacy

first_imgTim CohenNelson Mandela made what could be his last public appearance in London at a pop concert in Hyde Park. If it is to be his last, it’s hard to imagine a more appropriate exit. The event neatly closed a circle which began with a concert at Wembley Stadium in 1988 when he was still in jail and which called for his release. It was the event that exploded his name into broad international consciousness.The 46664 concert at Hyde Park, named after both Mandela’s prison number and his Aids charity, had an “end of an era” feel about it. This sense was partly invited by Mandela himself. At 90, Mandela naturally looked frail but his familiar gravelly voice and halting delivery came through with amazing vigour.His arch humility was there as usual, in the way he described himself as “a mere pensioner”. But there was a palpable sense of departure and ending that hung over the event. Mandela himself ended his speech to the 40 000-something crowd by saying: “It is time for new hands to lift the burdens. It is in your hands now.” Mandela’s conclusion was perfectly apt, not only about himself but in a way also about his generation.Despite the clear attempts by the organizers to include younger artists, there were still sufficient of those a bit long in the tooth to create a sense of reminiscing about old battles and old times.But in other ways, the concert was a perfect reflection of his legacy; his enduring connection with young people, his still resilient popular appeal, his craving for joyousness and harmony. The line-up at the concert was marvellously varied and disparate, including pop stars from Africa and Europe, and performers of massively different styles, underlining Mandela’s peculiarly broad appeal.The artists included everyone from the latest pop sensation Amy Winehouse to the now aging reggae star Eddy Grant to Sudanese rapper Emmanuel Jal to quasi-opera star Josh Groban. The graying ones included the remaining members of Queen, Jerry Dammers, Joan Baez and Johnny Clegg. They were all backed up fabulously by the Soweto Gospel Choir, which provided a link between South Africa and the predominantly British line-up.The harmony theme was underscored by some amazing duets. One included Afrikaans singer Kurt Darren, whose inclusion you suspect could only have been at Mandela’s insistence. Eddy Grant helpfully told the audience that Darren was “really popular in South Africa”. Darren joined Grant to sing the reggae star’s anti-apartheid hit “Give me hope Johanna” which was only slightly more weird than Groban and Vusi Mahlasela singing the old classic “Weeping”. The duet of the evening was performed by British R&B singer Jamelia and the South African Loyiso.The 46664 concerts have been very successful in raising Aids awareness, but they do slightly leave you with an odd sense of otherwise hedonistic, self-obsessed pop stars burnishing their personal brands by association with both Mandela and his good deeds. Film star Will Smith kicked off the concert with his wife Jada Pinkett Smith by quoting the singer Peter Gabriel as once saying: “If the world could only have one father, the man that we would choose to be our father would be Nelson Mandela”. It was sweet but hardly a quote of munificent insight and wisdom.However, it’s easy to be cynical about these events. One blogger in South Africa commented that the three primary goals of the concert were to “Firstly, and most obviously, to exploit Nelson Mandela while we still can. Secondly, to prop up the flagging careers of ageing British rock stars. And thirdly, to make middle-class British people and white South African expats feel really good about themselves”.Yet, there is something wondrous about them too. Simple Minds singer Jim Kerr, who wrote the song “Mandela Day” for the 1988 concert, recalled in an article in the Guardian how difficult it had been to get the big names to play at that time. “It’s interesting to now think of Mandela the man…because for almost three decades he was a myth. He was incarcerated. You’d barely even seen a picture of him.” Amnesty International, for example, did not support it because they were strictly advocates of non-violence. Yet the concert happened and a host of big names did participate.Of all the ostentatiously worthy pop concerts like Band Aid, support for Mandela’s freedom and later his legacy do have a sense of legitimacy, partly because of the history but also because Mandela transparently loves them so much. The leading lights of the music industry, particularly in the UK, really did anticipate the future with either magnificent or happily fortuitous insight in the case of Mandela, so their championing of him now is less creepy than it might otherwise have been.One of the best things U2’s singer Bono ever said, to the best of my recollection, about Mandela concerned a concert in a European city that had been particularly badly organized and the publicity poorly executed. Consequently, the crowd was small, and participants were shuffling their feet wondering how Mandela would take it. In fact, he just didn’t seem to notice how few people were there; he was just delighted at the people who had shown up. Mandela is the ultimate glass-half-full kind of person, and music forms part of that cup. Mandela’s embrace of it underlines just how deeply he feels about reconciliation.Go to the MediaClub weekly columns home pageTim Cohen is a freelance journalist writing for a variety of South African publications. He is currently contracted as a columnist to Business Day and the Weekender, where he worked for most of his career, and financial website Moneyweb where he writes on business and corporate activity for an associate site called Dealweb. He was the 2004 Sanlam Financial Journalist of the Year.last_img read more

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Ohio Farm Bureau launches new online safety program for farmers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Nearly everyone in Ohio’s agriculture community knows someone who has been seriously injured or who has perished from an on-farm related incident. While fatalities in farming activities have declined over the last few years, the ultimate goal is to eliminate farm-related accidents altogether. That’s the vision of Ohio Farm Bureau’s Cultivating Safe Farm Operations eLearning Safety Series, a new, interactive, engaging and accessible online education program developed for a broad audience of farmers, workers and on-farm youth to make real changes in their farm safety habits.Developed in partnership with Nationwide and Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Science’s Ag Safety and Health Program, the online safety series offers three 40-minute modules for learners and covers several basic agricultural risks. Each module integrates an assessment into the online platform to assure basic comprehension, which will help cultivate on-farm behavior modification.To access the modules, prospective learners must create an account through the Farm Bureau University platform, which is provided in partnership with American Farm Bureau Federation and includes additional self-directed learning opportunities. In addition, successful completion of the modules satisfies the annual Workers’ Compensation Group Rating Program safety training requirement for Ohio Farm Bureau members who are participants.The Cultivating Safe Farm Operations eLearning Safety Series would not be possible without the help of Dr. Dee Jepsen and Kent McGuire of Ohio State’s Ag Safety and Health Program, the team at Nationwide Insurance Risk Management Services and Ohio Farm Bureau’s e-learning consultant and Medina County Farm Bureau member Victoria Shaw. Additional thanks go to Alyssa Fodor of Medina County who shared a very personal story of her grandfather’s passing in a tractor rollover which was included in the program. These combined initiative efforts aim to fulfill the vision of “Creating a culture of farm safety to eliminate incidents in Ohio’s agricultural community.”Visit ofbf.org/agsafety for full details and to access this free training program.last_img read more

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SPORT-IPL-PARTHIV 2 LAST

first_imgAsked why he went particularly after KXIPs Mitchell Asked why he went particularly after KXIPs Mitchell Johnson, Parthiv, said, “I like the pace on the ball, he bowls quick and it is easier to use his pace. Last time when I was here, the same question had come because then I had smashed Johnson for 28 runs in one over. But yes, when you are bowling so fast and not accurate you can go for runs.” Parthiv also said that getting one lease of life early on and having a bit of luck always helps. “In a T20 game it is very important to have a bit of luck on your side as well. You take a lot of chances in first six overs and even after that. It is good to have luck on your side, sometimes,” he said. Asked about the initial dot balls, he said, “I thought the wicket was slow and a bit dry to start with. In last few games, we have lost too many wickets early on, we had to make sure that we did not lose too many wickets. If we had wickets at the end, we could score runs, so that was the plan. There was not plan of playing so many dot balls. I was trying, but I could not get going then.” PTI SUN PDS PDSlast_img read more

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10 months agoBournemouth boss Howe admits players’ confidence not sky high

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Bournemouth boss Howe admits players’ confidence not sky highby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth boss Eddie Howe admits the players’ confidence has taken a hit due to their inconsistency this season.Despite recent form, the Dorset club remain eighth in the top flight as the season heads towards the halfway stage. Howe said, “I do not feel confidence has been low but naturally when you do not win consistently, which is what we all want to do, somewhere along the line you take a slight hit.“It is important the players try not to let that affect them. We have to go into every game believing how good we can be as a team, truly believing in each other and with the quality we have we know everything is very short term.“We are still in a great position in the league and one or two good results in this period could elevate us again.” last_img read more

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10 months ago​Leicester loanee Benkovic reiterates Celtic desire

first_img​Leicester loanee Benkovic reiterates Celtic desireby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City loanee Filip Benkovic has admitted that he wants to stay at Celtic for the rest of the season.The 21-year-old is on loan at the Scottish champions, where he has impressed this season.He is a regular starter for Brendan Rodgers’ team.”I really hope I will stay here until the end of the season,” Benkovic told the Scottish Sun.”It’s not a decision for me but the Leicester coach has said I can stay here and that’s good for me.”I think staying here for a year will make me improve as a player. Coming from the Croatian league to the English Premier League is a very big difference.”I was only there for one month but I saw it was a big step up. I think this step, coming to Scotland, can make me better.”The least I can do is give 110 percent for the coach, the team and the fans.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Photo: Terrelle Pryor Is Back At Ohio State, In Ohio Stadium For 1st Time Since Tattoo-Gate

first_imgTerrelle Pryor stretching in Ohio State stadium.Terrelle Pryor Ohio StadiumTerrelle Pryor is back at Ohio State. The Cleveland Browns’ wide receiver, who starred for the Buckeyes from 2008-11, is in Ohio Stadium for the first time in four years. Pryor was banned from all contact with OSU’s athletic department in June 2011 as a result of his role in the Tattoo-Gate scandal. Pryor is with his Cleveland team, which will play a scrimmage in Ohio State’s football stadium this evening.  Pryor sustained a minor injury earlier this week and is reportedly not expected to play in tonight’s scrimmage.last_img read more

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WEEKEND ROUNDUP – APRIL 21 22 AND 23 2017

first_imgFAT 2017 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook It was a busy weekend in Toronto.  In addition to cinema and theatrical shows, the weekend events consisted of the FAT Show (Fashion Art Toronto), The Toronto Screenwriting Conference, The Harry Jerome Awards, TIFF Kids Festival, The Toronto Monologue Slam and the 1-year anniversary of the Women In The Film Industry Network Meetup.Here are some pics from the weekend. TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TIFF KIDS 2017 TSC 2017 TSC 2017 (Photo by Carolyn Kennedy) TSC 2017 – Paul Haggis TSC 2017 TSC 2017 (Photo by Carolyn Kennedy) TSC 2017 – Paul Haggis FAT 2017 FAT 2017 FAT 2017 FAT 2017 FAT 2017 FAT 2017 HARRY JEROME AWARDS HARRY JEROME AWARDS Prime Minister Trudeau and wife Sophie arrive at the HARRY JEROME AWARDS Fabi Toronto Mayor John Tory at the HARRY JEROME AWARDS Toronto Monologue Slam Women in the Film Industry Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

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Business Highlights

first_img___Stocks surge as Powell hints at slower interest rate hikesNEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks made their biggest gain in eight months after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell hinted that the Fed might be willing to raise interest rates at a slower pace next year. That relieved investors who were concerned that rising rates could slow the U.S. economy enough to bring an end to the nine-year-old bull market.____Powell: US economy healthy and rate hikes aren’t automaticWASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell cast a bright picture of the U.S. economy Wednesday and appeared to suggest that the Fed might consider a pause in its interest rate hikes next year to assess the impact of its credit tightening. Powell’s comments ignited a rally on Wall Street, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average surging more than 200 points after his comments were released.____US economy grew at brisk 3.5 pct. annual rate last quarterWASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy expanded at a solid 3.5 per cent annual rate in the July-September quarter, led by lower but still strong consumer spending and more business investment than previously estimated. The Commerce Department’s figure for gross domestic product, released Wednesday, was the same as its first estimate last month. GDP is the broadest measure of the nation’s output of goods and services and covers everything from homebuilding to haircuts.____Trump suggests he’s looking into tariffs on car importsWASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is hinting that he’s looking into slapping tariffs on car imports, a day after he threatened to slash federal subsidies to General Motors for wanting to close five U.S. factories. GM announced Monday that it wants to shutter the plants and slash 14,000 jobs in North America.____Not just jobs riding on fate of GM plant after Trump promiseLORDSTOWN, Ohio (AP) — General Motors’ major restructuring plan includes the possible closing of a plant in an Ohio industrial corridor where just last year President Donald Trump promised manufacturing jobs would be coming back. GM now faces a high-stakes decision on whether to shut down the Lordstown assembly plant, which makes the Chevy Cruze. Trump has blasted GM, threatening to cut off the automaker’s federal subsidies while also singling out the Ohio plant as one he wants to stay open.____Google CEO to make long-awaited congressional appearanceSAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google CEO Sundar Pichai will testify next week at a congressional hearing on the company’s business practices, just three months after aides put up an empty chair to symbolize his refusal to appear. Pichai is scheduled to appear Dec. 5 before the House Judiciary Committee. Among other things, lawmakers are expected to grill him on whether Google rigs its influential search engine to stifle conservative voices.____Fed: Some US businesses’ debt at highest level in 2 decadesWASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is signalling potentially vulnerable spots in the financial system, citing some U.S. businesses’ debt at the highest levels in two decades and risky debt growing. The Fed’s report issued Wednesday was its first assessing the stability of the U.S. financial system. Ten years after the financial crisis, the new report points to excessive borrowing by households and businesses, banks’ elevated debt levels, and unrealistically high prices for stocks and other assets.____Suddenly, luxury stores miss free-spending Chinese touristsNEW YORK (AP) — Tiffany & Co. is noticing that there is something missing in its stores: Chinese tourists. For the second time in a many months, a big seller of high-end goods noticed that a particularly crucial demographic of its shopping base had made itself sparse. On Wednesday, shares of Tiffany & Co. plunged 12 per cent after reporting weaker-than-expected sales in its third quarter. CEO Alessandro Bogliolo said that Chinese tourists have failed to show up.________UK central bank warns of deep recession without Brexit dealLONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has warned that leaving the European Union without a divorce deal could plunge Britain into its deepest recession in nearly a century. It says the economy could shrink 8 per cent within months as unemployment and inflation soar. The stark projection on Wednesday came the same day the government’s own economists said the country will be poorer after Brexit than if it had stayed in the EU.____The S&P 500 index climbed 61.62 points, or 2.3 per cent, to 2,743.79. The Dow Jones Industrial Average soared 617.70 points, or 2.5 per cent, to 25,366.43. The Nasdaq composite jumped 208.89 points, or 2.9 per cent, to 7,291.59. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks leaped 37.53 points, or 2.5 per cent, to 1,530.38.Benchmark U.S. crude slipped 2.5 per cent to $50.29 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, the standard for international oil prices, sank 2.4 per cent to $58.76 a barrel in London. Wholesale gasoline lost 1.6 per cent to $1.40 a gallon. Heating oil fell 2.5 per cent to $1.84 a gallon. Natural gas rocketed 10.6 per cent to $14.72 per 1,000 cubic feetThe Associated Presslast_img read more

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