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Dolores inquest adjourned in London for second time

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Advertisement Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Dolores O’Riordan. Pic: Ken Coleman WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Twitter Print THE circumstances surrounding the death of Limerick singer Dolores O’Riordan will not be made known for sometime after the London inquest into her death was adjourned this Tuesday.Five days after the music icon was found unresponsive in a London hotel room, her inquest oopened but was adjourned to allow the coroner receive the results of tests that were carried out at post mortem.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up However, the same court adjourned the inquest this Tuesday with no date set for the hearing and the matter has now been removed from the list.Metropolitan police say that they are not treating the death of the Cranberries lead singer as suspicious.On January 15 last, Dolores O’Riordan (46) was in London for a recording session but was found unresponsive in her London Hilton room on Park Lane before her death was later confirmed leaving her family, friends and the wider community shocked and in disbelief.The adjournment by Westminster Coroner’s Court of the singer’s inquest comes some 11 weeks after her untimely death.Eileen O’Riordan receiving the book of condolences from Mayor Stephen Keary.Last week, the singer’s mother Eileen received a book of condolences from mayor of Limerick Stephen Keary who said that it was the largest one ever given by the local authority.Afterwards, Eileen O’Riordan said that the death of her daughter was “very hard to absorb”, as she thanked the many thousands of people who helped the family take the next step forward in a outpouring of love.Of her daughter, Eileen said; “I don’t miss the rockstar, I miss my little girl”.Eight days after her death, Dolores O’Riordan was buried with her father in Friarstown, Co Limerick, following a service at Saint Ailbe’s Roman Catholic Church in Ballybricken.The world renowned singer is survived by her three children with ex husband Don Burton,  Taylor, Molly and Dakota, her mother Eileen; and partner Ole Koretsky.Cranberries bandmates Noel Hogan, Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawler are still planning to release their final album with Dolores’ vocals, which was recorded shortly before her death.It will feature alongside a reissue of their first ever album Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?, to mark its 25th anniversary.See more news here Linkedin Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live TAGS”noel hogan”cranberriesDolores O’RiordanFergal LawlerlimericklondonLondon Hilton Park LaneMike Hogan Facebook LimerickNewsDolores inquest adjourned in London for second timeBy Staff Reporter – April 3, 2018 1209 Previous articleYoung man from Uganda thanks people in Limerick for their donationsNext articleThe next Limerick Historical Society lecture to be given by former RTE correspondent Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” WhatsApp Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

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‘Lacking In Propriety’: SCAORA Condemns Jagan Mohan Reddy’s Letter Regarding Justice Ramana [Read Resolution]

first_imgTop Stories’Lacking In Propriety’: SCAORA Condemns Jagan Mohan Reddy’s Letter Regarding Justice Ramana [Read Resolution] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK14 Oct 2020 3:44 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court Advocates-On- Record Association has issued a statement condemning the letter written by Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Jagan Mohan Reddy to the Chief Justice of India, wherein he has alleged Justice NV Ramana of interfering with the administration of justice by the State’s High Court. SCAORA has said that the act of circulating such a letter in the media…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court Advocates-On- Record Association has issued a statement condemning the letter written by Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Jagan Mohan Reddy to the Chief Justice of India, wherein he has alleged Justice NV Ramana of interfering with the administration of justice by the State’s High Court. SCAORA has said that the act of circulating such a letter in the media “lacks propriety” and scandalizes the Court. “SCAORA notes, with deep anguish, the contents of the letter dated 06.10.2020, written by a Chief Minister to Hon’ble the Chief Justice of India, concerning a sitting Judge of the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India next in line to become the Chief Justice of India. The SCAORA condemns the act of the unwarranted release of the said letter on 10.10.2020 in a press conference, to be lacking in propriety and not in accord with the High Office of the Constitutional functionary involved, as it tends to scandalise and breach the independence of the judiciary,” the Resolution passed by the Association states. The resolution to condemn the said letter was passed unanimously by the Executive Committee of the Association on Tuesday, October 13. The Delhi High Court Bar Association has also condemned Reddy’s statements that tend to undermine the confidence of the public in the administration of justice by the Supreme Court. The Andhra Pradesh High Court has ordered a CBI inquiry into cases registered for defamatory remarks against Judiciary, by YSRCP leaders. A plea has also been moved before the Supreme Court stating that the contents of Reddy’s letter have put the confidence of people in Judiciary at stake. On October 11, Y S Jagan Mohan Reddy, the Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, wrote a complaint to the Chief Justice of India, S A Bobde, alleging that some High Court judges are attempting to protect the interests of the major opposition party, Telugu Desom Party, in politically sensitive matters. A striking feature of the complaint – details of which were revealed to the media in a presser by Ajaya Kellam, the advisor of the CM, on Saturday evening – was that it had accused senior Supreme Court judge, Justice N V Ramana, who is next in line to be the Chief Justice of India, of influencing the administration of justice in the High Court. Click Here To Download Resolution Read Resolution Next Storylast_img read more

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Finsbury to cut production at Memory Lane

first_imgProduction is to be cut at Finsbury Food Group’s premium cake business Memory Lane Cakes, as sales continue to fall in the recession.The bread, cake and morning goods manufacturer said production at the Cardiff business  is likely to be cut from seven to five days a week. A consultation with employees is currently taking place on changes to shift patterns, with 95 jobs out of Memory Lane’s 1,000-or-so staff at risk. This represents 4% of Finsbury’s total workforce of 2,500. Memory Lane is the leading manufacturer of the UK retailers’ premium own-label cake ranges. Martin Lightbody, chairman and major shareholder at Finsbury, told British Baker: “There is a general decline in cake sales, including premium, and we have been at the forefront of premium, especially celebration and upper-tier cakes.“The number of products sold on deals this year increased dramatically, so we have been looking at cost-cutting over innovation. We must show our customers that we can produce excellent products again.”Read the full story in the 18 December issue of British Bakerlast_img read more

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Trail Mix – Travis Book & Jon Stickley Live at The Down Home

first_imgSeven years ago this month, I covered The Infamous Stringdusters when the band played The Down Home, one of the South’s most venerable music rooms, in Johnson City, Tennessee.While working on my review, I chatted with bass player Travis Book. His take on the room has stuck with me ever since, and I am reminded of it every time I step through The Down Home’s doors.“There’s a lot of history, a lot of good times had,” said Book. “It’s kind of like playing inside a Martin D-28.”Travis Book returns to The Down Home tomorrow night with long time friend – and guitar wizard – Jon Stickley. Both of these guys are long time friends of Trail Mix and have been well chronicled here; I chatted with Stickley about his latest record in October, and I last caught up with Book when he was putting together what might be the most epic weekend ever.In between tours with their respective bands – Book with The Infamous Stringdusters and Stickley with his trio – Stickley and Book have taken to playing duo shows. Drawing from their respective catalogs and a collection of tunes purposed specifically for these shows, the duo has crafted a show that allows their individual talents to compliment each other wonderfully, with Book’s baritone and rhythm guitar work allowing Stickley to roam with abandon around his fretboard.I have heard nothing but great things about two recent performances in Brevard and Asheville. I found that praise well warranted after checking out videos for “Long and Lonesome Day” and “Della’s Walk.”The kinship and connection between these two is obvious.Says Book, “Few things make me happier than listening to Jon play the guitar and standing on stage with him is a joy. His love of the music and exploratory spirit are contagious, and he always brings out the best in the people he plays with.”Trail Mix would like to give you the chance to check out what Stickley and Book can get up to when they put their musical heads together. Take a shot at the trivia question down below. A winner of two tickets to the show will be chosen from all answers received by noon tomorrow (Thursday, January 21st).Question . . . . Both Travis Book and Jon Stickley play Martin guitars. Whose Martin is older?You have a 50/50 shot!!!Good luck.Tickets for Thursday’s show are $14 and will available at the door. Music starts at 8:00.Featured image by David Simchock.[divider]More from Trail Mix[/divider]last_img read more

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Syracuse splits weekend series with Lindenwood

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 8, 2013 at 2:44 pm Syracuse looked shell-shocked on the ice after its stunning 2-1 loss to Lindenwood. Less than 24 hours later following the disappointing outing, though, Syracuse responded with a convincing 4-1 win over Lindenwood to end the first half of its season.Senior defender Caitlin Roach described Friday’s defeat in the simplest way possible.“They outworked us and got their shots on net,” Roach said.SU (8-8-2) displayed a lack of energy from the start against Lindenwood (2-14-2) with Chancellor-designate Kent Syverud and Director of Athletics Daryl Gross among the 202 people in attendance at Tennity Ice Pavilion on Friday night. The Lions struck first when forward Kendra Broad scored halfway through the second period to give her squad a 1-0 edge.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNearly two periods into the game, Syracuse was unable to capitalize on any opportunities against sophomore goalie Nicole Hensley. That changed when Roach delivered on a power-play goal by going coast to coast and tying the game with 1:03 remaining in the period.But Lindenwood was not fazed, as smiles and high-fives surfaced on the ice as the second period came to a close. The Lady Lions were in an ideal position to earn their second victory of the season.“There was no feeling of momentum on our side,” Roach said. “Lindenwood still had the momentum on their side of the puck and we didn’t take our chances of capitalizing coming into the third period.”Lindenwood capitalized on the biggest opportunity of the game within the closing seconds of the final period. After Syracuse forward Jessica Sibley committed a penalty with 34 seconds remaining, the Lions were given a five-on-four opportunity in the final seconds of regulation.Twenty-eight seconds into the power-play, Lindenwood’s Katie Erickson launched from the point with ease as she watched the puck sail past Jenesica Drinkwater for the game-winning goal.Drinkwater, who was dealt her first loss of the season, lost the puck in her tracks. “I kind of lost sight of it quickly and it cost me,” she said. “Those couple seconds were really key into going into overtime.”She did not provide any excuses for the team’s effort overall against Lindenwood, though.“They didn’t stop working all game,” she said of the visitors. “They were putting everything they could on net so I’m going to give them kudos.”Despite entering the game with one victory on the season, Lindenwood proved to Syracuse that its record is not an indication of how much effort they give on the ice. Roach acknowledged that her team underestimated the Lady Lions.“I feel that mentally we didn’t prepare ourselves for how hard of a working team they are,” she said.On Saturday, though, Syracuse responded with a dominant win. Senior Margot Scharfe started the offensive production for the Orange with a goal 11 minutes into the first period with her team shorthanded. Sibley added a power-play goal less than five minutes into the second period, giving Syracuse a two-goal lead that was never relinquished.Forward Nicole Ferrara added a goal that extended the lead to 3-1 in the third period, followed by an empty-net goal by forward Melissa Piacentini in the final seconds of the game.Syracuse head coach Paul Flanagan was pleased with his team’s effort this time around.“Our mental preparation was a lot better,” Flanagan said. “They outworked us at times (on Friday) and we just didn’t execute. Today, I thought we outworked them. We had to set the tone with our work ethic.”Flanagan believes that the first half of the season had some missed opportunities, but there is plenty of time to make the necessary improvements for a playoff push.“It’s comforting that we are back to .500”, he said. “I think we’ve learned a lot about ourselves as a team. They understand what we have to do to be successful. “Regardless of our record, I know we are capable of beating anybody.” Commentslast_img read more

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‘Loose words’ from Donegal player spurred Tyrone on

first_imgGAA: Niall Morgan has revealed that ‘loose words’ from a Donegal player at half-time spurred his side on in the second-half. The Tyrone goalkeeper revealed that as the sides departed the pitch at half-time, one Donegal player said ‘We’ll beat this team of individuals.’He told The Irish Examiner, that presumption couldn’t have been further from the truth. Morgan said, “When we were going in at half-time we heard someone from the Donegal side shout, ‘We’ll beat this team of individuals.’“We’re no team of individuals. We’re a massive team, we’re a unit. We go everywhere together, we do everything together.“People talk about being over-trained – we can’t get enough training! We love it. “We love being together, that’s what wins you games.”Morgan also added that it was nice to exercise his demons and get one over on Donegal, after the taunting he got in Ballybofey in 2013.“It was a chance for me to get a bit of redemption after 2013 in Ballybofey.“I reacted stupidly to the crowd, I learned my lesson and I’ll never do that again.“It’s great to move forward and I have a bit of confidence in myself.”‘Loose words’ from Donegal player spurred Tyrone on was last modified: July 20th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalGAALoose WordsnewsNiall MorganSportTyronelast_img read more

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Report: Warriors simmering over Kevin Durant’s snub of ‘dignified’ Stephen Curry

first_imgFor all Kevin Durant’s skills as a finisher, he apparently has no clue how to call it quits on a team.Three years ago he bolted the Oklahoma City Thunder, leaving bruised feelings in his wake. Now the Warriors know the feeling.The Athletic reported that Stephen Curry was flying from Shanghai to New York on Sunday to personally meet with Durant before Durant announced a decision on his professional future.We now throw it to Bill Simmons, who divulged details on his podcast. “The …last_img read more

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Instant Geology and Undersea Activity

first_imgWe’re accustomed to thinking of geological processes as slow and gradual, except for volcanoes, earthquakes and landslides, but some recent stories are surprising for the speed and extent of active processes.Run: The Earth Is Splitting Apart:  Geologists were amazed to find a rift in the Afar desert east of Ethiopia opening up 8 meters wide and 60 kilometers long in just three weeks, reported BBC News.  They call this a rapid episode in the slow formation of a new ocean basin, a process that normally takes millions of years.  This rapid change was called “unprecedented in scientific history.”Springs of the Sea:  Hydrothermal vents are popping up everywhere, wherever scientists look.  USA Today said they ocean floor is covered with them; MSNBC News said they are not just along tectonic plate boundaries like the pacific Ring of Fire, as previously assumed.Wow, at 8 meters every 3 weeks, that ocean basin would be 82,000 miles wide in a million years, bigger than the whole earth!  Just kidding, of course.  Nobody is saying that is a typical or uniform rate.  It does illustrate, however, that big things can happen in a short time if the conditions are right.  Faster rates than that could be envisioned, and must have been the case for certain large-scale, catastrophically-formed regions.    It’s time to relegate Lyell to the history books where he belongs.  His uniformitarian gradualism was useful to Darwin in the Victorian age.  Darwin became obsessed with the vision of how large changes could occur by the accumulation of small variations over long eons of time.  That vision has seen too many challenges to be assumed in our day.    By the way, how did the ancient philosopher Job know about hydrothermal vents?  “Have you entered the springs of the sea?  Or have you walked in search of the depths?” (Job 38:16).  He must have been told by someone who knew.  There’s another source of data too often overlooked by moderns: direct testimony from the Architect.(Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Henry David Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin Led to Loss of Belief in God

first_imgFor a thoroughly-documented yet disturbing tableau of the pernicious effects of Darwinian thinking on all aspects of society, we recommend one of Dr Bergman’s most recent books, How Darwinism Corrodes Morality (2017).(Visited 848 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The effects of Darwinism go far beyond biology. On the bicentenary of Henry David Thoreau, a historian traces his fall from grace into Darwinian materialism.by Dr Jerry BergmanNovels and literature can be critically important avenues for changing Western culture. Most surveys find that more people read fiction and stories in general, such as historical fiction and romance, than nonfiction of all types. Fiction has a huge impact on our beliefs for this and other reasons.What is nature? A product of design, exalting life, or chance, demeaning it? Photo by David CoppedgeIn Concord, Massachusetts this year, on July 11, a bicentennial celebration will be held for Henry David Thoreau, a giant American literary figure known for advocating the romantic ideal of a simple life surrounded by the beauty of nature. In an article in Nature, Randall Fuller traces Thoreau’s debt to Darwin after Walden, watching him fall from the grace of nature’s sublime design to a material world of chance.Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was one of the most important American writers. He is best known today for his book Walden, that stressed the benefits of simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for disobeying unjust actions of government. He was a prolific author whose works have been a staple of American education from high school to college for decades. Along with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bronson Alcott (the father of Louisa May Alcott), Thoreau and his circle of friends were writers with wide influence. But another writer would come to heavily influence them all: Charles Darwin.[i]For example, up to this time Thoreau accepted transcendentalism, the view that asserts the primacy of the spiritual and transcendental over the material. But then, his reading of Darwin’s Origin began to severely challenge this worldview for which he was best known, Fuller says.[ii] Many other leading early American writers and clergy, after they understood “Darwin’s theory of natural selection … discover[ed] that it also posed enormous threats to their other beliefs, including their faith in God and their trust that America was a country divinely chosen for the regeneration of the world.”[iii] Thoreau had to face these issues head on just five years after he had published Walden in 1854. (He died of tuberculosis in 1862 at age 45, three years after Darwin’s Origin had arrived in America.)This process can be wrenching; it leaves people trapped between two ways of thinking and believing, stranded between two existences.Due to the influence of Darwin, Thoreau moved “close to Darwin’s position. He assumed the universe was governed by laws, but he also believed that the products of those laws occurred in a more or less random way. He hovered between design and chance, between idealism and materialism.”[iv] In the end, Thoreau rejected the transcendentalism for which he had been famous, and placed the mystery and wonder of life within the worldview of materialism. Nonetheless, Thoreau realized that empirical knowledge is finite, and afterwe have exhausted its limits, we are still left with speculation, supposition, and hypotheses. And those are invariably influenced by belief in some ordering principle. For many people, that principle involves a divinity inherited from four thousand years of tradition.[v]He was speaking, of course, of the influence of the Bible as the “ordering principle” that influenced “many people”. But for himself? He was raising questions and having doubts. Even Darwin had faced similar doubts as he discussed the implications of his theory with a close friend. For example, in an early draft of his Origin of Species, Darwin wrotethat nature was composed of “laws ordained by God to govern the universe.” Soon after sending his book to Asa Gray, he wrote, “I am inclined to look at everything as resulting from designed laws, with the details whether good or bad, left to the working out of what we may call chance.” (Within a year or so he would abandon the idea of design entirely; it was unnecessary, he realized, for his theory.).[vi]Darwin’s dangerous idea led to the two camps still existing today, namely those who advocate Intelligent Design and creationism, and the other camp that has chosen Darwinism as the explanation for all living things, and thus dispenses with any need for design or guiding intelligence to explain the origin and development of life.Fuller says that Darwin’s theory of natural selection maintains that all life evolves largely as a result of the environment, “thriving or dying as a result of their ability to adapt. This process can be wrenching; it leaves people trapped between two ways of thinking and believing, stranded between two existences.”[vii]  He concludes that, in the end, Darwin’s theory has “remade the world” from the Christian era to the Post-Christian world.[viii]Darwinism had a major influence on America not only through his own writings, but through other influential writers like Thoreau who converted to Darwinism after reading Darwin’s Origin of Species. Because Darwin had raised fundamental questions about the nature of life, his influence permeated novels and other works of literature, converting the man best known for transcendentalism and the sublimity of nature into a materialist seeing his formerly-sublime world as the product of mindless chance.In summary, Darwin’s 1859 book was “the single most important idea of the nineteenth century,” Fuller says. “It is also an account of issues and concerns that are still very much with us, including racism, one of the most intractable problems in American life, and the enduring conflict between science and religion.” [ix] And that was the very book that turned Thoreau into a Darwin disciple. Thereafter, his tainted pen helped spread Darwinism to the masses.For more on Randall Fuller’s research into Darwin’s influence on Thoreau and the Transcendentalists, see Evolution News & Science Today.[i] Randall Fuller “Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin.” Nature. June 15, 2017. 546:349-350.[ii] Randall Fuller “Thoreau’s Debt to Darwin.” Nature. June 15, 2017. p. 349.[iii] The Book That Changed America: How Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation, by Randall Fuller, New York: Viking. 2017. p. x.[iv] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[v] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[vi] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. pp. 193-194.[vii] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.[viii] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.[ix] Fuller. The Book That Changed America. p. x.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, scientist, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. For more of his writings, see his Author Profile.last_img read more

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Superfruit growing workshop this month

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The potential market for so-called “superfruits” in Ohio could offer growers an additional income stream thanks to increasingly health-conscious consumers and ongoing research that finds these plants can grow well in the Buckeye state.That’s according to a fruit crop expert with theCollege of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, who said that based on research trials of elderberry, aronia berry and Chinese goji berry plants at Ohio State’s South Centers in Piketon, the berries are a viable option for Ohio growers.Fruits such as these, which are also known as “super berries” because of their nutrition quotient, including a rich antioxidant content, are growing well in the research trials, said Gary Gao, an Ohio State University Extension specialist and associate professor of small fruit crops. OSU Extension is the college’s outreach arm.The Superberry Project is funded by a specialty crop block grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture through the Ohio Department of Agriculture.Gao and his team planted six varieties of elderberries, three varieties of Chinese goji berries and one variety of aronia berries for the trial at the South Centers. Some plants were installed last year and some more mature plants were added this year.The plants are already fruiting and ripening, Gao said.“Although the majority of growers in Ohio have very limited experience with commercial production of elderberry, aronia and goji berries, there are already some small-scale growers across the state who have tried them and are doing it well, particularly with elderberry and aronia berries,” Gao said. “There are several growers who’ve added these plants to their farm operations and have formed an informal co-op to begin sharing production and marketing information.”Goji berries are high in antioxidants and vitamin C. Aronia, also called black chokeberry, is said to have more antioxidants than blueberries. Elderberry contains more phosphorus and potassium than any other temperate fruit crop and is also rich in vitamin C.To help berry growers – new and experienced alike – learn how to produce elderberry, aronia, goji and other berries, horticulture and viticulture experts from the college are offering a Super Berry School Aug. 20. The program is 6-9 p.m. at the OSU South Centers’ Endeavor Center, 1862 Shyville Road, in Piketon.The workshop topics include:* Elderberry, aronia berry, and goji berry production and marketing.* Blueberry cultivars and production techniques.* Summer and fall vineyard management practices.* Blackberry and raspberry production systems.The workshop will also include a tour of the plant trials.Leading the workshop will be researchers and educators with OSU Extension and theOhio Agricultural Research and Development Center, including Gao, viticulture outreach specialist Dave Scurlock and research assistant Ryan Slaughter.OARDC is the research arm of the college. The South Centers are also part of the college.Registration for the workshop is $25 and includes the program, handouts, a light dinner and refreshments. Contact Charissa McGlothin at 740-289-2071, ext. 132, to register or for more information. The deadline to register is Aug. 17.last_img read more

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